The Best Definition of Conversion Rate Optimization Ever Written

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Who better than a scientist to come up with the best definition of conversion rate optimization ever? Read …

Having trouble viewing the text? You can always read the original article here: The Best Definition of Conversion Rate Optimization Ever Written

Who better than a scientist to come up with the best definition of conversion rate optimization ever? Read on. Be the Judge. What exactly is conversion rate optimization? You’ve read about it over and over, but you may not have a proper understanding of how to apply it to your ecommerce store or to your […]

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Hotjar Alternatives: 21 Tools for Optimizing Your Website and Conversion Rate

Hotjar is a great tool for website optimization, but some marketers may need something a little different. If that’s you, here are 21 Hotjar alternatives.
The post Hotjar Alternatives: 21 Tools for Optimizing Your Website and Conversion Rate appeared f…

Hotjar Alternatives: 21 Tools for Optimizing Your Website and Conversion Rate

Hotjar is a great tool for website optimization, but some marketers may need something a little different. If that’s you, here are 21 Hotjar alternatives.

The post Hotjar Alternatives: 21 Tools for Optimizing Your Website and Conversion Rate appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Selling Stories: Which Big Game Advertisers Best Tied in Commerce?

“No one likes to be sold anything, but everyone loves a great story.”

It’s something I’ve been known to say often over my 20+ year career in advertising and marketing. But not today. Today, I want to see a buy now button.

At $6 million a spot, with …

“No one likes to be sold anything, but everyone loves a great story.”

It’s something I’ve been known to say often over my 20+ year career in advertising and marketing. But not today. Today, I want to see a buy now button.

At $6 million a spot, with about another $2 million for talent such as Sly Stallone (and rights to all of those movie clips) and another $2 million for agency fees, location fees, production, and lattes, and you’ve got a $10 million opportunity to sell something. Super Bowl ads are often looked at as cultural events that have rarely done anything to gain market share or earn new customers.

I realize that the Super Bowl isn’t Black Friday, and not every moment has to be a commerce moment. But this is advertising. Isn’t this our job?

Who Created a Great Commerce Moment

Walmart

Walmart is the big winner with the perfect mix of entertainment, featuring familiar characters from the big studios demonstrate the ease of Walmart Pick-up and show the utility of what we can buy from their aisles. Walmart built partnerships across entertainment and CPG vendors to create an ad where everyone wins. In fact, the retail giant came out as perhaps the biggest winner of the night. Assuming that these were also monetization opportunities through its Walmart Media Group, Walmart offset a great deal of its expense through vendor-funded placements for everything from Bud Light and Tostitos to Hamilton Beach, iRobot, WD40 and other branded items, all purposefully placed in the big blue bag.

P&G

While P&G’s ads, from Olay’s Make Space for Women to Tide’s #LaundryLater, weren’t screaming to BUY NOW, they all told a story of partnership, culminating in the fourth quarter ad, When We All Come Together, which features products, mascots, and talent from across the P&G portfolio of brands. This is significant because it builds a picture in people’s minds of the P&G “store.” Throughout the “choose your own adventure” style lead-up to the Super Bowl, P&G was using its site to collect user preferences and develop narratives for the ad. A $15 rebate was offered that required personal information (including date of birth), the name of the retailer that was shopped, and a receipt upload. This is a smart and engaging way for CPG brands to start building their first-party data and laying the foundation for a direct-to-consumer future.  

Who Could Benefit from a Retail Partner

Avocados from Mexico

Avocados from Mexico won first place in Merkle’s Digital Bowl rankings for SEO! One point of consideration would have been extending its fictional home shopping network spot to include a retail partner. This would allow for a powerful partnership with a retailer who wants to own “fresh” and even translate the comical idea of unique avocado accessories to physical gifts with purchase in store or online.

Who Missed Out  

Hy-Vee

A mid-western grocery chain, Hy-Vee could have learned something from Walmart with its Super Bowl ad. It was a great construct, setting up the smart phone as nothing more than a Hy-Vee app allowing you to shop for groceries anywhere. However, there were no brand partnerships. Each app image had generic product placements and the products in the actors’ hands were unbranded. This would have been a real success if they could have built upon the partnerships with their CPG vendors and the many unique products that they stock.

Do Super Bowl ads have to sell? Of course not. But why not develop ads that entertain, inform, and drive to purchase? Layering on a commerce moment by collecting consumer preferences, identifying retailer affinities, and providing the occasional offer would give these brand advertisers the ability to grow their first-party data, ultimately leading to smarter marketing and better shopping and consumer experiences in the future.

SaaS Acquisition: The Hidden Risks of a “Frictionless” Sign-Up Flow

Optimizing the sign-up flow is a never-ending saga for SaaS companies, for whom it’s mission-critical to acquire and activate users as quickly as possible.  Within the sign-up flow, the dreaded word is “friction.” Sadhana Balaji sums it up: You can optimize your value proposition or call to action buttons all you want, but if your […]

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Optimizing the sign-up flow is a never-ending saga for SaaS companies, for whom it’s mission-critical to acquire and activate users as quickly as possible. 

Within the sign-up flow, the dreaded word is “friction.” Sadhana Balaji sums it up:

You can optimize your value proposition or call to action buttons all you want, but if your sign-up flow contains too much friction, you’re leaving money on the table.

Friction, Sadhana continues, is “the psychological resistance that your visitors experience when trying to complete an action.” It’s a conversion killer. There are various ways to optimize sign-up flows and reduce friction, many of which are detailed in Sadhana’s article.

At the same time, every sign-up flow has some friction. All SaaS businesses, for example, need at least an email to connect a service or purchase to a specific user. 

It’s easy to assume that the sign-up process with the least amount of friction is best. But there are no absolutes in conversion optimization—what works for one site or business doesn’t work for another. 

We’ve learned that the hard way. We built a near-frictionless sign-up flow with a 96% conversion rate. And while it worked wonders for creating sign-ups, it unearthed other issues and became a blocker to solving them.

This is our cautionary tale for frictionless sign-up flows—their latent perils and our ongoing quest to create the right amount of friction. 

The original sign-up flow

Our company, Smartlook, provides qualitative analytics solutions for websites and mobile apps. We’re a startup in a dynamic industry and without extravagant resources. 

This story starts with our (now older) sign-up process. It was a simple four-step process embedded within the app environment:

Step 1: Registration

step 1 of old sign-up flow.

Step 2: Profile

step 2a of old sign-up flow.
step 2b of old sign-up flow.

Step 3: Project

step 3 of old sign-up flow

Step 4: Code

step four of old sign-up flow.

This flow needed to change—fast. But not because it wasn’t driving conversions or user engagement. There were other reasons:

  1. The flow didn’t work for mobile project creation. At the time, we’d just released our product for mobile apps, and we needed to tweak the flow to support mobile projects, too. 
  2. The flow design was dated. It was a holdover that didn’t match our latest app design. The experience from registration to the refreshed dashboard was inconsistent. 
  3. The flow locked users in. This was our biggest sin. There wasn’t an easy way to leave the flow and check out the app without finishing. The user had to add the project tracking code or choose an integration to proceed onward. This, of course, was detrimental for non-technical users who just wanted to review the app. 

These challenges spurred us to revamp the flow as soon as possible. But that urgency worked against us. We moved forward without a specific framework, deep data analysis, or comprehensive testing plan. Everything was ad-hoc. 

The work started with the addition of a mobile project option, like this:

addition of mobile app option into sign-up flow.

It was an obvious first-aid patch. But it allowed us to focus our attention on other issues within the sign-up flow. 

The next iteration of the sign-up flow

Our team brainstormed ways to solve the known issues with our sign-up flow—what we could change, what direction to take, etc.

Aside from the urgent issues outlined above, which initiated the whole ordeal, we outlined a couple of underlying objectives for our redesign:

  1. Get users to our core feature (session recording) faster.
  2. Make the process as frictionless as possible. 

We also tried to make the flow more graphical, seamless, and fun. We wanted it to be an engaging introduction to the Smartlook story and product.

We decided to delay the marketing and support consents (Step 2 in the old process) until the very end—when the user lands on the app dashboard. Tracking code and project details would also be delivered once the user was inside the app.

We further simplified signup with Google and Facebook logins. This is how the new flow worked: 

  1. A sign-up URL with several options for account creation and a legal agreement. 
  2. Definition of project type—mobile or web.
  3. Name and role definition.
  4. Company name and segmentation.
step 1 of sign-up.
The first step in the new sign-up flow.

These adjustments minimized the steps and friction in the user experience—from landing on the website to signing up and seeing Smartlook’s capabilities. It also looked nicer—way nicer. But, aesthetics aside, did it meet our objectives? 

step two of sign-up.
Step 2 in the updated sign-up flow.

We had built the flow to minimize user inputs and remove friction. For example, when someone typed in a name, clicking on the “Role” immediately led to the next step. There was no need to click “Next”; user inputs drove the flow.

Our data showed that the changes indeed streamlined the sign-up process. Our new sign-up funnel started with a pageview of the sign-up URL and ended with a custom event that confirmed a project had been created:

high conversion rate with low-friction sign-up flow.

The conversion rate from landing on the sign-up page to completing the process was 70.6%. At the very least, that exceeded industry benchmarks (for what they’re worth). We were generally satisfied with the results.

And, as we gathered more data, the numbers kept getting better:

  • 75% of users who saw the sign-up page converted.
  • 99% of those who started the sign-up process completed it.

But we had created unanticipated problems.

The perils of a frictionless sign-up flow 

So what was the issue? Our conversion metrics didn’t connect to more important ones: activation rate and, of course, revenue. In our platform, activation rate is the number of projects that actually receive data. 

Project activation, not surprisingly, is essential for us to demonstrate value and engage users.  Until users connect data sources, we can’t show them anything other than demo projects, videos, images, etc. And demo data lacks the context users care about—their data. 

Our users needed to take an extra step—activation—to get to a “Wow!” moment. After the changes to our sign-up flow, our activation rate was floating around 60%, which may seem good until you consider the big picture: 

decline in activation rate after friction removed from sign-up flow.

The activation rate had been dropping since the July 2019 changes and, by January 2020, was down 18.9% (14 percentage points) compared to the beginning of last year.

This led to some serious introspection:

  • Was the new sign-up flow to blame? Activation rate is a relative number that can be offset by other activities. Sure, we increased lead generation, which can decrease the activation rate. But such a significant drop shouldn’t happen. 
  • What new problems did it create? More accounts created but not activated incurred unjustifiable costs on AWS, Intercom, Mailchimp, etc. Additionally, all our users and product engagement metrics got skewed. We saw more users, but they weren’t doing anything. Filtering out passive users became a growing nuisance to the team.    
  • Why did it happen? In comparison to the previous sign-up flow, we delayed project activation and instructions until after the sign-up flow was complete. 

We had a hypothesis: A sign-up flow that completed without users adding their data meant that they got lost, distracted, or disappointed with Smartlook before installing the snippet and activating the project.

We had to fix that.

Re-introducing friction into our sign-up flow

We decided to revamp user onboarding by focusing on personas within the Jobs-to-be-done framework. That meant we had to show our users specific solutions to problems and issues based on their profile. This is the context we aimed to provide to users upon finalizing registration.  

That wasn’t easy. We had a solution that allayed pain points for different roles within companies. Within the same platform, store owners, product managers, marketing analytics professionals, customer success officers, and UX specialists all had “jobs” that Smartlook could help them do. 

To improve our activation rate, we poured over our user data to identify core personas and JTBD. Many new users shared the first role and first category of company—not because those were their roles but because they were flying through the sign-up flow at full speed, clicking the closest button. 

From their perspective, this was fine. From ours, not really. We needed specific answers to improve product tours and onboarding. But that also meant that we’d need to reintroduce some friction into our sign-up flow. 

We tweaked the flow so that users had to select the role and company category—in two separate steps—before signing in. We also added a “Prev” and “Next” button as a second interaction. The flow didn’t proceed automatically after users picked a category.

step three of sign-up.
In the updates to the new flow, a second click was introduced to slow users down and gather more accurate data.

Also, unlike the first sign-up flow, we made “website category” mandatory, not optional. That small bit of friction reduced conversions.

If you compare it to the prior funnel (before introducing the friction), you can see that the sign-up flow steps completion worsened by 1.21 percentage points; the overall conversion rate dropped from 70.61% to 66.98% (a 5.14% decline).

decline in total conversion rate after adding friction to the sign-up flow.

But this small tweak brought us the intended benefits:

  • The number of new, inactive accounts dropped. That saved money on consumption-based services. 
  • We still have a sign-up flow that’s efficient for users, but it also delivers the information we need to tailor onboarding. We can now work to reduce friction so long as we preserve the information we need. 
  • We’ve had great success building contextual product tours with Intercom, which rely on the new data acquired by friction in the flow. For example, we now show users how to add events directly from a session recording as they watch it—not after, not before, but as they review recordings. (I explore other changes in detail here.) 

The next instance of product tours will be built with even greater emphasis on specific user roles, like funnel building for ecommerce or dashboard tiles tailored to store owners’ needs. That work is already underway.  

Conclusion 

Best practice–driven solutions are tricky. Sometimes they work, sometimes they expose more problems. 

In our case, the goal of optimizing our sign-up flow started with the elimination of friction. But that exacerbated other issues with our project activation rate, increased consumption rate, and, as a result, costs. 

There are no universal solutions. The best practices we all rely on sometimes don’t make any sense in our specific, real-world applications. There was no template for introducing just the right amount of friction for our product.  

I’d like to close with an open call for critical thinking and thoughts. I did my best to be as transparent as possible and show real issues we face. The team and I will gladly take criticism on where we made mistakes and direction on plausible solutions. 

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How to create amazing infographics

Writing for an infographic requires a delicate balance between telling a story and
providing hard-hitting points to drive your message.

The post How to create amazing infographics appeared first on Marketing Land.

CopyPress has a defined process on how to create amazing infographics for their clients. With a little effort, you can follow their breadcrumbs and create amazing infographics of your own!

To start, they segment the process into three groups: the business team, the graphic design team, and of course the audience who consumes the infographic. None of these people approach infographics in the same way, which can lead to miscommunication and potentially a bad customer experience.

This white paper will demystify these three roles to help you and your team create something your audience will love. By following these steps, all teams should be able to work together to turn your infographics from tolerable to top-sharers.

Visit Digital Marketing Depot to download“How to Create Amazing Infographics,” from CopyPress.

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Pro Tip: Here’s why content audits are so important

Content management is never a one-and-done process so a revitalization plan is simply good SEO strategy.

The post Pro Tip: Here’s why content audits are so important appeared first on Marketing Land.

One common mistake when it comes to developing and publishing content on a site is never touching it again. Having a content revitalization strategy to ensure content is relevant is just as (if not more) important than adding new content to drive organic traffic.

If it’s been a while since older posts on your site have been updated, it may be time to conduct a content audit.

I’ve followed this process with several SEO clients and it yielded impressive results. One client in the employment industry saw a 40% lift in organic traffic and a 131% increase in goal completions in nine months. A client in the education space saw a 42% lift in overall organic traffic and 40% increase in goal completions over three-and-a-half months after following the steps below and implementing changes based on the findings.

Here’s how you need to review your content:

1. Create a list of all URLs into a spreadsheet (you can pull this from the sitemap).

2. Use Google Analytics to determine how many sessions each page had over the past six months (or longer depending on how much traffic comes to your site). Also, check how many backlinks each post has. This process will take quite a bit of time depending on the amount of content on your site, but posts that have no backlinks and aren’t generating traffic likely need to be revised to provide SEO value.

3. Identify pages with “thin content” that don’t satisfy a user’s search intent. Build these posts out to provide more information on the topic.

4. Identify posts with duplicate or similar topics, then determine if they should be combined into one longer authoritative post or if one should be removed completely.

5. Identify posts with outdated content or older statistics and update to include more recent information. It also helps to keep a running list of posts that need to be updated regularly. For example, if it’s a post about mileage tax rates that might change every year.

6. Don’t forget to redirect posts removed from the site to avoid 404 errors.

7. Repeat this process on a regular basis (annual or bi-annual) to keep your content relevant.

Remember: Content revitalization should never be a one-and-done process.

Pro Tip is a special feature for marketers in our community to share a specific tactic others can use to elevate their performance. You can submit your own here.

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Old vs New: How Repeat Visitors Impact Your Metrics and 3 Strategies to Increase Engagement

New, new, new. New year, new website, new goals… the focus on new never ends. T&T marketers know that the majority of their website visitors are new users and tend to focus their personalization strategies around engaging these new visitors. But what about your return visitors? Do you know how your return visitor traffic stacks… Read More

The post Old vs New: How Repeat Visitors Impact Your Metrics and 3 Strategies to Increase Engagement appeared first on Bound.

New, new, new. New year, new website, new goals… the focus on new never ends. T&T marketers know that the majority of their website visitors are new users and tend to focus their personalization strategies around engaging these new visitors. But what about your return visitors? Do you know how your return visitor traffic stacks up compared to other destinations?

Working in the DMO space gives us unique insight. Return visitors can make up anywhere from  6-30% of sessions for destination websites. While return visitors commonly have slightly higher performance on pages per session and visit duration, they tend to have a higher bounce rate than new visitors.

It makes sense to prioritize strategies for new visitors, but if almost a quarter of your website traffic is returning visitors, it’s also important to plan the best possible website experience for these repeat visitors. 

Here are 3 questions to keep in mind when thinking about your repeat visitor traffic and some best practices to keep this audience engaged.

How Frequently Are You Showing Overlay Content?

We’ve discussed the ethics of “pop-ups” before, but this is of utmost importance when considering your repeat traffic. If you are only setting daily or weekly limits on your pop-up content, your returning traffic is likely being repeatedly disrupted by that same old content. 

Best Practice: Serve unique content only once a month at minimum, and if possible, consider showing even less frequently, like every six months or once a year. If there is specific content repeat visitors should see multiple times, set up fresh versions of the content instead of short frequency limits. This prevents content fatigue and also helps the new content stand out from what they saw on their last visit.

Where Are Your Repeat Visitors Located?

Geo-targeting is always a solid strategy and shouldn’t be overlooked for repeat visitors. Because your repeat audience is smaller, breaking out individual markets creates very tiny visitor groups, but consider separating your local audience from drive or fly regions. The reasons a local visitor frequents your website are quite different from someone who would be potentially flying in. Additionally, while repeat visitors are prime candidates for hotel/places to stay offer content, someone already in the area likely isn’t interested in these deals.

Best Practice: Take advantage of geo-targeting to create in market, drive market, and fly market repeat visitor groups. You can then serve content to these visitors that’s more likely to be of interest, such as hotel deals for out of market visitors and activity deals or upcoming events to local visitors.

Where Are Your Repeat Visitors Entering the Site?

Identifying where repeat visitors are landing can help you determine if it’s a page that typically has fresh content, or if they’re potentially seeing the same thing over and over again. The homepage is still the most common landing page for repeat visitors, and having been there before these visitors are less likely to scroll down the page. 

Best Practice: If you aren’t currently updating your hero content on a regular basis, consider targeting repeat visitors with fresh content or at minimum, new imagery. To combat fatigue, plan to update repeat visitor content more frequently than your other visitors. Alternatively, consider setting up your hero based on exclusions so that repeat visitors who have already been to the destination page are served new content. 

By keeping these best practices in mind, you can use personalization to make your returning visitors feel like they’re getting a new experience not once, but every time they come to your website.

If you’re interested in discussing other ways to engage your returning visitor traffic, contact us today!

The post Old vs New: How Repeat Visitors Impact Your Metrics and 3 Strategies to Increase Engagement appeared first on Bound.

Who Took Home the 2020 Digital Bowl Trophy?

As the biggest game of the year ended with a comeback ‘W’ for Kansas City, it also brought the seventh edition of the Merkle Digital Bowl report. Our annual report provides a detailed assessment of how Super Bowl advertisers supported their TV commerci…

As the biggest game of the year ended with a comeback ‘W’ for Kansas City, it also brought the seventh edition of the Merkle Digital Bowl report. Our annual report provides a detailed assessment of how Super Bowl advertisers supported their TV commercials. Commercials this year cost as much as $5.6 million for 30-seconds of airtime, so it’s critical to amplify their reach with a comparatively inexpensive digital campaign.

In the report, each advertiser is evaluated based on its ability to meet specific and objective criteria across paid search, organic search, social media, and digital media. While the creative efforts largely influence how audiences respond, Merkle scores each brand’s efforts to extend engagement with a digital strategy in the competition for audience attention on the second screen.

So, who took home the 2020 trophy? This year’s winner is…TurboTax!

TurboTax hit us with a #W2Step to make a comeback from its 2016 Merkle Digital Bowl-winning performance and took home the Digital Bowl title for a second time. TurboTax unleashed a multi-channel campaign that finished with the top score in two channels (Digital Media and SEO), and narrowly missed the top score in a third (Social Media). TurboTax achieved this dominant performance by executing the fundamentals and fusing them with a few strokes of inspired creativity.

How They Did It

TurboTax dominated SEO by using a dedicated landing page featuring its commercial and YouTube videos to carve out its space in organic search. The brand also featured strong coverage across display, paid social, and video, but stood out with its hashtag challenge on TikTok, which garnered over 100 million views. In social, TurboTax scored a close second by concentrating efforts on TikTok and maintaining a regular Twitter presence, engaging with celebrities and other advertisers. While it fell outside the top ten in Paid Search, TurboTax by no means dropped the ball, receiving a solid score for its keyword coverage, ad copy, and engagement.

TurboTax TikTok

Check out the full report here for more in-depth analysis of the top advertisers and how they ranked across channels. I will also be doing a webinar with the other team captains on February 6. Claim your spot for the webinar here.

The biggest opportunities look like toys

“When something is described as a toy, that means it has everything an idea needs except being important. It’s cool; users love it; it just doesn’t matter. But if you’re living in the future and you build something cool that users love, it may matter more than outsiders think.”—Paul Graham You can find opportunities by […]

“When something is described as a toy, that means it has everything an idea needs except being important. It’s cool; users love it; it just doesn’t matter. But if you’re living in the future and you build something cool that users love, it may matter more than outsiders think.”—Paul Graham

You can find opportunities by searching for things that are growing fast but aren’t taken seriously yet. Growth numbers are a leading indicator of success; public opinion is a lagging indicator of success. Success often feels like finding money on the pavement—and then looking around suspiciously, wondering why other people haven’t taken it.

YouTube

In the UK, the TV program Gavin & Stacey was the most-watched show on Christmas Day, having what the newspapers described as “an incredible 11.6 million viewers.” It had the highest TV viewing figures of the decade.

On the same day, we watched Whatever The Ball Hits, I’ll Buy, in which ChrisMD—a minor YouTube celebrity—played a game of football in his local field with his sister and cousin. It had over 8 million views.

We think it’s interesting that the newspapers didn’t gush enthusiastically about the ChrisMD video. (It’s not even his most-viewed video—there are 19 above it.) That discrepancy between the numbers and the public perception is a source of opportunity.

Honey, a coupons app, is growing rapidly. Its Chrome browser extension currently has over 148,000 reviews—more than almost every other Chrome extension. And it was recently acquired by PayPal for $4 billion. For comparison, Foot Locker currently has a market cap of $4.1 billion. Honey is piggybacking off YouTube in two ways:

  • First, its ads are almost unavoidable on YouTube. Here’s one of them. If you set YouTube to “Autoplay,” when the ad finishes you’ll see a stream of similar ads, each of which has had millions of views.
  • The ads are presented by famous YouTubers, not traditional celebrities. The presenter from the link above, MrBeast, currently has 29 million subscribers. Each of his last 20 videos had between 10 million and 40 million views. MrBeast has influence far beyond that of most traditional celebrities.

Two more observations:

  1. The Honey ads are in the direct-response style. They are designed to convert. They don’t look like “real” TV ads.
  2. Ads like the Honey ones are organized via influencer agencies, which manage the relationship between the advertisers and the influencers. Influencer agencies are new. You could imagine them being mocked.

Coupon extensions … YouTube … direct response ads … influencers … and influencer agencies. None of them sounds legitimate compared to their traditional equivalents: resellers … TV … brand ads … celebrities … and ad agencies. The opportunity comes from playing with the toys.

We suspect that YouTube ads presented by famous YouTubers is a winning formula that will take over from TV advertising.

How we benefited from this principle

When we started Conversion Rate Experts in 2006, conversion rate optimization (CRO) looked like a toy. It didn’t have a name, for a start. (We coined and trademarked the term “CRO” when someone asked us what we called that thing we did, and they weren’t happy with our reply: “conversion.”) Marketing conferences were almost entirely populated with SEOs and paid search experts back then, so we had to start every conference talk with a slide that explained what “conversion rate” meant. After one talk, someone said to us: “I like that little thing you do.” For years, we were the quirky outliers—until Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook, and Dropbox hired us to work on their websites.

If we were to start another company today, we’d aim for it to be similarly toy-ish.

What toys should you play with?

What are the “toys” in your industry, things that have high growth figures but aren’t being taken seriously?

How can you get involved with them before everyone catches on?

Positioning Your Product or Service to Appeal

Having trouble viewing the text? You can always read the original article here: Positioning Your Product or Service to Appeal
Positioning your product or service requires understanding the root desire of your website visitors. This changes from visitor…

Having trouble viewing the text? You can always read the original article here: Positioning Your Product or Service to Appeal

Positioning your product or service requires understanding the root desire of your website visitors. This changes from visitor to visitor. Positioning your offering generically to appeal to them all doesn’t work. Find out what does.   Why do people buy robot vacuums? Is it to clean the floor? Maybe. Is it to have more leisure […]

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