AdWords vs AdSense: 3 Big Differences That You Should Know

AdWords and AdSense are two separate advertising platforms offered by Google that have very different use cases. Often used in the same context,… > Read More
The post AdWords vs AdSense: 3 Big Differences That You Should Know appeared first on Retail…

AdWords and AdSense are two separate advertising platforms offered by Google that have very different use cases. Often used in the same context,... > Read More

The post AdWords vs AdSense: 3 Big Differences That You Should Know appeared first on Retail Performance Marketing Blog - CPC Strategy.

The Amazon Ecosystem for Vendors, Explained | 2018 Edition

There was once a time when vendors had limited control over what happened to their products once they sold them to Amazon. Those… > Read More
The post The Amazon Ecosystem for Vendors, Explained | 2018 Edition appeared first on Retail Performance Mar…

There was once a time when vendors had limited control over what happened to their products once they sold them to Amazon. Those... > Read More

The post The Amazon Ecosystem for Vendors, Explained | 2018 Edition appeared first on Retail Performance Marketing Blog - CPC Strategy.

Spotify Ads | How to Leverage Music and Big Data to Win Consumers

Spotify went public in 2008 in a market crowded with rival music services. In less than 10 years, the music streaming app has… > Read More
The post Spotify Ads | How to Leverage Music and Big Data to Win Consumers appeared first on Retail Performance…

Spotify went public in 2008 in a market crowded with rival music services. In less than 10 years, the music streaming app has... > Read More

The post Spotify Ads | How to Leverage Music and Big Data to Win Consumers appeared first on Retail Performance Marketing Blog - CPC Strategy.

Enable attribution across all channels, platforms and devices

It’s no secret that legacy attribution solutions are limited. As consumer digital journeys become increasingly cross-platform and cross-channel, these attribution providers have largely failed to evolve and adapt. This white paper from Branch Metrics covers: An overview of web and app attribution as they have developed. The challenges faced by today’s web and app attribution. […]

The post Enable attribution across all channels, platforms and devices appeared first on Marketing Land.

It’s no secret that legacy attribution solutions are limited. As consumer digital journeys become increasingly cross-platform and cross-channel, these attribution providers have largely failed to evolve and adapt.

This white paper from Branch Metrics covers:

  • An overview of web and app attribution as they have developed.
  • The challenges faced by today’s web and app attribution.
  • The shortcomings of fingerprinting and cookie-based attribution methods.
  • The benefits of industry-leading people-based attribution and its benefits.

Visit Digital Marketing Depot to download “Ultimate Guide to Web and App User Attribution.”

The post Enable attribution across all channels, platforms and devices appeared first on Marketing Land.

How Personalization and Testing Even In Just One Channel Drives More Revenue

The push for omnichannel personalization and a seamless customer experience isn’t a fad. Marketers and their organizations have seen the value in delivering highly personalized experiences for their buyers, and there is no turning …

The push for omnichannel personalization and a seamless customer experience isn’t a fad. Marketers and their organizations have seen the value in delivering highly personalized experiences for their buyers, and there is no turning back. As more traditionally brick...

Finding Website Optimization Gems

How do you decide which elements of your site to test? This question is at the heart of website optimization. A better question is, “How do you determine what NOT to test?” It’s relatively easy to come up with ideas that might increase your conversion …

How do you decide which elements of your site to test? This question is at the heart of website optimization. A better question is, “How do you determine what NOT to test?” It’s relatively easy to come up with ideas that might increase your conversion rate. We typically come up with 50, 75, 100 or more...

The post Finding Website Optimization Gems appeared first on Conversion Sciences.

How to Use Personalization to Enhance Your Existing Optimization Program

We know an A/B test can lead to powerful insights. However, the information gained from traditional A/B tests tends to be focused on what’s best for the majority of users – not every individual user. That’s where personalization comes in. Personalization enables you to leverage the specific wants and needs of each individual user on […]

The post How to Use Personalization to Enhance Your Existing Optimization Program appeared first on Brooks Bell.

We know an A/B test can lead to powerful insights. However, the information gained from traditional A/B tests tends to be focused on what’s best for the majority of users – not every individual user. That’s where personalization comes in.

Personalization enables you to leverage the specific wants and needs of each individual user on your site. This can lead to even more substantial results–higher conversion rates, deeper engagement with your site, and increased revenue.

Many of the traditional testing tools–Adobe Target, Optimizely and Maxymiser–have personalization capabilities available. There has also been an emergence of companies like Dynamic Yield and Evergage, which offer personalization technology as their core focus.

As technology in this space improves, personalization has become a major focus for many Brooks Bell clients. However, the question we’re often asked is not whether to implement personalization alongside existing optimization efforts – rather, its how to do this.

Luckily, there are many ways to do just that. For the purposes of this blog post, we’ve outlined two relatively simple strategies for implementing personalization alongside your existing optimization program.

Strategy 1: Rule-based targeting

Rule based targeting is a personalization technique that’s available on most A/B testing platforms. Instead of targeting all users, you select a specific segment of users to target an experience to: new or returning users; mobile or desktop users; or users in a specific location.

Because these different types of users are interacting with your site differently, you’ll likely see higher returns by personalizing your content to each group.

You can also apply rule-based targeting after running a traditional A/B test, by breaking down your results by those specific user segments. In doing so, you may find that a “winning” homepage experience performed very well among new users, but was flat for returning users.

Though pushing the winning variation live to all users would increase revenue, you might see a bigger increase if you were to push it live to new users only. This gives way to additional opportunities to test different strategies for returning visitors.

Strategy 2: Predictive personalization

Many testing platforms now offer predictive personalization, which works in real time to learn which experiences are ideal for certain types of users.

A predictive personalization “test” runs indefinitely – and adjusts as users’ preferences change over time, showing the optimal experience to each user.

Predictive targeting technology is exciting for many reasons. It accounts for the fact that a winner from a year ago might not be the best option for your users now.  

The technology also makes it easier to figure out the best option for short term website changes, like a holiday promotion–for which A/B testing is not a viable option due to time constraints.

Additionally, having the ability to step back and leave the analysis to the computer – instead of spending the time analyzing data yourself – is a huge benefit to experimentation professionals and the companies they work for.  

There are, of course, potential pitfalls to this form of personalization.

When you run a traditional A/B test with a clear winner across all users, it’s easy to make the decision to build the winning code into your site. However, with predictive personalization, you may have many different versions of a page for different segments of users, and continue relying on the testing tool to deliver the code, never building it into your site.

This can be risky for a few reasons: it can increase load time; and if, over time, other updates are made to your site, those updates could break the experience.

Additionally, you’ll also want to make sure you trust that the machine learning algorithms are actually making the best decisions for your users. To that end, many platforms offer a control experience which segments users randomly. You can then compare metrics from the control against the personalized segments to ensure the algorithm is working optimally.

Personalization offers the opportunity to gain new insights about your users and deliver the most valuable content for each individual. Incorporating personalization into your testing program is certainly worth the investment, with the potential for huge rewards.

At Brooks Bell, our Personalization Jumpstart program enables enterprise optimization teams to incorporate and scale personalization strategies into their existing optimization programs. To learn more about our services, contact us today.

The post How to Use Personalization to Enhance Your Existing Optimization Program appeared first on Brooks Bell.

5 Ways to Optimize Your Website For Converting Visitors into Customers in 2018

One of the central points of a successful website is optimizing your sales funnel for conversion. Here’s a guide to CRO, including the buying cycle and the optimization of your website for each stage. But what is the buying cycle? In a nutshell, it is a patterned process customers go through when contemplating a purchase. […]

The post 5 Ways to Optimize Your Website For Converting Visitors into Customers in 2018 appeared first on Blog.

One of the central points of a successful website is optimizing your sales funnel for conversion. Here’s a guide to CRO, including the buying cycle and the optimization of your website for each stage.

But what is the buying cycle?

In a nutshell, it is a patterned process customers go through when contemplating a purchase.

In most cases, you can break the buying cycle into three stages.

  • Top of the Funnel: The “awareness” stage when a customer is trying to solve problems, get an answer, or meet a need. At this stage, they are usually unaware of their problem, so you need to show it to them through blog posts, eBooks, and other useful resources.
  • Middle of the Funnel: The “evaluation” stage when a customer is doing research on whether your product or service is a good fit for them. At this point, they already know their problem and they are looking for the best solution.
  • Bottom of the Funnel: The “purchase” stage when your visitors convert and become a customer. At this stage, all you need is the right offer.

breakdown of visitor type to your website

Source

Your marketing campaigns must be different based on what stage the customer is in the buying cycle. Your goal is to move the customer to the next phase of the buying cycle, and your final goal is to get customers to the convert stage or to the bottom of the funnel. At this stage, the customer buys the chosen product.

Unfortunately, it’s not that easy. The average conversion rate is only 3% which means 97% of visitors leave the average website without buying. Improving the conversion rate is essential for all websites. If you ignore it and focus only on driving traffic, you’ll quickly spend most of your money with little to show for it in return.

In this article, we’ll focus on how to optimize your website for the conversion stage. Let’s dive into it!

  1. Optimize your checkout page

Making checkout process fast is a really important requirement for ecommerce sites. Many visitors will leave your website at this point if your checkout process is confusing and slow. For example, a checkout process that goes through more than two pages is likely to result in an abandoned cart.

In order to avoid this, it’s a good idea to show a progress bar to your visitors so they know exactly where they’re at in the checkout process.

Another common practice is to minimize distractions as much as possible. A minimal checkout allows the customer to check out instantaneously and increases the chances of a sale. Don’t have twenty fields on your checkout page, ask only what is required and allow the customer to fill the information in broad, convenient fields.

Ultra.com has the perfect example of a minimal checkout:

Optimize your checkout page for increased website conversion rate.

Now let’s see a bad example – don’t try to copy this one:

Optimize form fields to complete the visitor journey.

  1. Don’t force registrations

Have you noticed that nearly every website you visit asks you to “sign up” or “sign in”? But these accounts are usually forgotten in a few weeks and it just frustrates visitors.

Registrations usually involve extra steps in the buying process and it will hurt your store. Some visitor will leave the site because they don’t want to register. Some will struggle with the registration. Allowing guest accounts can simplify the process for new customers. Guest checkout means that visitors can make a purchase from your store without logging in to an account or saving any information in your database.

impact of shipping and delivery charges on checkout process.

If you want to make your checkout process even easier and less frustrating, allow shoppers to use a social media account. According to research, 66% of consumers prefer using social login.

  1. Shipping and handling costs should be clear

Many websites show taxes, shipping charges and other charges at the end of the check-out process. This is a terrible tactic. It will definitely create a feeling of shock for the customer.

That’s why you should always make the total cost visible as soon as possible. It’s even better if you already highlight your shipping costs on your homepage and product pages.

Using dynamic shipping policy is also a good practice. It means that you display real-time shipping rates to your customers based on their address, and include all costs like in the example below.

Optimize the registration step in your checkout process.

  1. Recover abandoning visitors on-site

Just because a customer adds something to the cart, it doesn’t mean he/she’s going to buy it. In fact, the average ecommerce cart abandonment rate is nearly 70%. In other words, 7 out of 10 visitors who add an item to their cart will leave the store without buying. But luckily, there is a way to save these visitors and reduce cart abandonment. It’s called onsite retargeting. Onsite retargeting works by monitoring visitors’ behavior, and when their behavior indicates they are ready for some additional message, it will be displayed to them, usually in a popup. I suggest displaying a popup which either prompts them that they are leaving or provides them an incentive to complete the purchase like in the example below.

use pop-ups to decrease cart abandonment rate

  1. Increase the sense of urgency

Visitors often think “I’ll buy it later” while browsing online stores. They leave, and they never come back – even if they really liked the product. Fostering a sense of urgency is a very effective way to overcome procrastination. You have a number of ways to make your visitors feel like there is a “ticking clock”. For example, you can offer free shipping for a limited number of buyers: only the first 50 buyers. Another option is to show when one of your products is out of stock. It can also increase buyer confidence by implying there is demand for the product and showing a certain number of items have already been sold. You can also set up deadlines for discounts or offer free shipping for a limited time, e.g. 15 minutes. The expiration date of the offer creates a sense of urgency in your customers.

Below, you can see an example where they provide $50 off if the visitors finish checkout within 5 minutes.

offer on exit intent pop up to convince visitors to purchase

Summary

Every customer goes through the buying cycle. Customers want different interactions with you depending on where they are in the buying cycle.

In this article, we were focusing on the convert stage. Optimizing your checkout page and allowing guest registrations are important to prevent cart abandonment. Despite all these efforts, some visitor will still try to leave your site, this is when you need to recover them using onsite retargeting and fostering a sense of urgency.

Using the tips we’ve shared, you’ll be able to optimize your website for the convert stage. You should check all points and see how they work for you.

The post 5 Ways to Optimize Your Website For Converting Visitors into Customers in 2018 appeared first on Blog.

Amazon Reappears in Google Shopping Results After Brief Exit

Well that was fast.

After pausing its U.S. Shopping campaigns at the end of April, Amazon is once again popping up in Product Listing Ad results for a number of queries. Merkle Associate Manager Robbie Schnizler first noticed the e-commerce giant’s re…

Well that was fast.

After pausing its U.S. Shopping campaigns at the end of April, Amazon is once again popping up in Product Listing Ad results for a number of queries. Merkle Associate Manager Robbie Schnizler first noticed the e-commerce giant’s renewed presence in Shopping results this morning, and below is a screenshot taken this afternoon.

Amazon Google Shopping Ad

It’s too early to quantify Amazon’s presence in auctions at this point as it takes a couple of days for data to populate in Google Auction Insights reports, which provide impression share data for AdWords advertisers and their competitors. We should have a better sense for how expansive its reentry is this weekend.

Were the past couple of weeks just part of a holdout test for Amazon to measure the incremental impact of its Shopping ads? Did Amazon get nervous after seeing a drop in orders from pausing campaigns and decide to reconsider? Was this all just a dream?

It’s anyone’s guess at this point, but for now Amazon is back in the Google Shopping game.