5 Ways to Use Visitor Behavior Analytics to Increase Your Conversions

Conversions are one of the topmost pain points for most businesses today. Why? Because they’re highly unpredictable and yet are the most critical aspect affecting every business’s growth. The unpredictability of conversion stems from the unpredictable behavior of us, humans. Just the change of the color of a CTA button or adding a single word…

Conversions are one of the topmost pain points for most businesses today. Why? Because they’re highly unpredictable and yet are the most critical aspect affecting every business’s growth.

The unpredictability of conversion stems from the unpredictable behavior of us, humans. Just the change of the color of a CTA button or adding a single word to your landing page headline can bring about a drastic change in your conversion rates. 

For example, Cocohanee, an eCommerce website, increased their number of transactions by 40% simply by adding their USP on the product pages and redesigning their menu! Who would have thought about that?

If only there was a way to understand and decode user behavior and use it for optimizing landing pages, right?

Use user behavior analytics to improve conversions

Though we cannot completely analyze and predict user behavior, user behavior analytics can help us speculate at least some parts of it and increase conversion rates.

You too, can use user behavior analytics to bring about a drastic improvement in your conversion rates and increase the ROI of your business (check out VWO Insights). Let’s have a look at how you can do that.

1. Use heatmaps for your landing pages

Heatmaps are a system for data visualization where you can view users’ behavior using a color-coded system. Using heatmaps, you can precisely visualize human behavior. The colors indicate the number of clicks on any part of the webpage.

Using heatmaps for your landing pages can be an excellent way to understand how your visitors are interacting with your webpage. You can understand where the users are focusing their attention.

VWO Heatmap

Using heatmaps for landing pages, you can find data about your landing page content, the images and videos that you have added, and the call to action button clicks. This way, you can find room for improvement and use it to improve your conversion rates.

You can also use scrollmaps to identify the ideal length of your landing page. Using a scrollmap, you’d know the ideal position to place your sign-up form and CTA to get maximum conversions.

You can use a mouse-tracking heatmap to track mouse movement. This way, you can identify the places where most of your visitors are hovering over. You can set goals for your heatmaps and document important observations. Based on these, you can come to accurate conclusions that will help you bring about drastic changes in your conversion rates.

Once you’ve found how your visitors are interacting with a particular element on your landing page, you can use A/B testing to test different variations of the same element. This way, you’ll be able to optimize your conversions.

A great example of the use of heatmap would be the case study of Paltalk, a B2C chat service based out of the USA. Using heatmaps, it was observed that users were not able to effectively view the different categories of virtual gifts. With a change in design for the virtual gifts menu, Paltalk increased their conversion rate by 11.32%!

Take a full-featured free trial with VWO to leverage heatmaps for your website.

2. Personalize the experience based on the user journey stage

Not every user of yours would be the same. Some would be new and unfamiliar to your brand. Some might have heard your brand’s name but don’t really understand your offering. While some others might have been stalking your website for a while.

This means users at different stages of their customer journey would have different perceptions about your brand and your offering. So, is it fair to target them with the same messaging and expect them to convert? Absolutely not!

Instead of targeting all your users with the same landing page and messaging, you can try to segregate your users based on their customer journeys and then target them with different landing pages. This strategy can be extremely effective in improving your conversion rates.

For the segregation of your customer data based on their customer journey stages, a potent Customer Relationship Management tool such as SuperOffice can be powerful. SuperOffice will gather all your prospect and customer data along with the information about the touchpoints with each of these users.

Using a CRM tool such as SuperOffice, you will be able to create customized target lists of users based on their customer journeys. 

You can then target each of these lists with different landing pages, email campaigns, advertising, and messaging. You’ll definitely see a massive increase in your conversions this way.

Here are some other ways to personalize user experiences:

  • Visitor data collection – Collect prospects’ data and use it to offer ultra-personalized experiences to them. You can collect visitor data by cookies, web beacons, email activity tracking, or even asking the visitors directly.
  • Visitor profiling – Based on the customer and prospect data collected, you can create your ideal customer personas to offer personalized experiences to each of these personas.
  • Set your goals – Before implementing personalization, it is good to set goals for the same. What do you want to achieve using personalization? In this case, it would be increased conversions but you can set a few other goals too.
  • Plan and implement – Next, you can start working on your strategies for personalization. You can use A/B testing to try different variations of your personalization strategies. This way, you’ll get much better results.
  • Measure success – Finally, you should keep track of your metrics and understand if your set goals were. This way you can keep improving your conversion rate over time.

3. Find the reason behind increased bounce rate

If you are experiencing increased bounce rates on your website, especially on your landing pages, then this is not something that you should ignore. Increased bounce rates can be a major indicator of the fact that something might be going wrong.

So, get down to the root cause of it. You can use heatmaps and session replays to understand the reason behind increased bounce rates. There can be multiple reasons for this. Some of them being:

  • Inconsistent branding and messaging can drive away your website users. Hence, ensure that you use consistent branding and messaging along all the touchpoints.
  • Slower page load speed can be a major reason why your users are bouncing.
  • Your headline and the entire landing page copy may not be enticing enough for the user to stick around and convert. So, make sure to add a more benefit-driven copy that directly hits the pain points of the users.
  • Add some more engaging elements such as an image, an illustration, a video, and some form of social proof. Adding these elements will persuade the user to put their trust in you and fill-up your form.

Once you’ve found the most probable reason for the increased bounce rate, you can use A/B testing to confirm the reason. For instance, if you think that the headline of your landing page is the reason for increased bounce rate, you can try split testing by varying your headline and optimize your conversions this way.

4. Vary your landing pages based on the traffic sources

Most businesses have multiple traffic and referral sources for their landing pages. Some part of your traffic may be coming from emails, some from social media advertising, while some from SEO. 

The users from all these traffic sources would have come across different messaging. For example, your Facebook ad might read “Free landing page optimization tactics,” while another referral traffic source might have read “Free checklist for increasing conversions.”

Though these two messaging might be indicative of the same, it is better to stick to the exact same messaging throughout. Hence, you can consider having different landing pages for different traffic sources. 

Doing this will ensure that your landing pages are appropriately customized for every user segment. And this will definitely lead to an increase in the number of sign-ups.

5. Use session recordings to optimize your landing pages

You can also use session recordings of your landing pages to analyze the user behavior with great detail. 

VWO Session Replays

With each session recording, you can look for details such as the mouse movement, user clicks, scrolling patterns, and the area of your landing page where the user is spending the most time. 

Using session recordings, you can improve the performance of your website’s core metrics by improving the site navigation, site design, form design, and form flow. You can run experiments and reduce bounce rates, ultimately leading to increased conversion rates.

Increase Conversion Rates Using Session Recordings

Using session recordings of your landing pages, you can understand common browsing patterns and distractions that are keeping the users from clicking on your CTA button. 

There may be a huge number of reasons for reduced conversion rate such as a misplaced CTA, a distracting ad, or a lengthy form. Whatever the reasons may be, you’ll be able to analyze that through session recordings and make appropriate amendments.

Using this data from session replays, you can try to change your landing page structure, which will ultimately lead to increased conversions for your business. 

For example, suppose you find many of your users are stopping at a particular point in your landing page. This may be because the users find this part more interesting and want to stop and read through it. So, you can consider placing this part above the fold to make your landing page even more impactful.

You can then use A/B testing to test if your observations based on session recordings are working as expected. Request a demo with the experts at VWO for valuable insights on your website.

A good example would be A/B testing done on the Locations Hawaii website. Using 3-variation A/B testing where the CTA button was changed in each variant, the number of leads was increased by 23%

The Control And Variations Of The Locations Hawaii Property Detail Pages

Start using user behavior analytics to improve your conversions

You now know the various tactics you can use to analyze users’ behavior and come to precise conclusions based on it. 

Using behavior analytics can be a major turning point in your business’s growth. So, start implementing these strategies right away and watch a massive boost in your conversions.

How to Design Your “Unsubscribe” Page to Hold Subscribers Anyway

As a responsible brand, you insert the “unsubscribe” links or buttons to emails. But let’s face it: When subscribers want to leave you, it hurts. They are moving on to a relationship with other businesses, and you can’t do anything to win them back. Or can you? A quick question: What does your “unsubscribe” page…

As a responsible brand, you insert the “unsubscribe” links or buttons to emails. But let’s face it: When subscribers want to leave you, it hurts. They are moving on to a relationship with other businesses, and you can’t do anything to win them back.

Or can you?

A quick question: What does your “unsubscribe” page look like? The catch is that businesses often overlook the power of this marketing instrument. When designed and used right, your “unsubscribe” page can help manage the contact’s base, optimize a conversion rate, and make consumers think twice before leaving you.

In this guide, you’ll find alternative business goals to accomplish with an “unsubscribe” page and learn how to design it so that it would serve to save relationships with your customers.

The role of “unsubscribe” pages in customer retention, compliance, and user experience

An “unsubscribe” page opens when a user clicks on a corresponding link in newsletters or sales emails. Its primary purpose is to confirm that a person wants to break up with your business and stop getting messages from it.

But experienced marketers look beyond this traditional notion.

They use “unsubscribe” pages as a chance to retain subscribers, offer alternatives for better compliance, or capture user feedback to improve the experience for future subscribers.

Not only can a well-designed “unsubscribe” page convince users that they should stay on your mailing list and keep receiving value, but it also helps you clean the contacts’ base. Only those loyal to your brand or interested in your products will stay, which is an excellent way to focus on proper segmentation and protect your business emails from being reported as spam.

For many brands, an “unsubscribe” page is a chance to create a positive user experience. It’s the last touchpoint of a user with your business emails, so it needs to be good enough to leave a positive impression about your brand. While your newsletters may not be attractive to unsubscribers anymore, your value proposition might.

Five extra goals to accomplish with your “unsubscribe” page

Think of an “unsubscribe page” as a tiny yet significant step to adopting a culture of experimentation in your organization. It’s a tool helping you improve user experience with no risks to your business. It’s your chance to learn more about the target audience and optimize all the processes to their needs.

Ensure that you use “unsubscribe” pages to their full potential. An efficient page can help organizations accomplish at least five business goals:

  • Gather feedback

Use an “unsubscribe” page to ask subscribers for valuable feedback. Most templates include the “I no longer want to receive your newsletter” option, but it doesn’t tell anything about the reasons why a person leaves you. Their feedback should allow you to learn and improve the user experience.

So tailor the answers to “Why unsubscribe” to your business needs. Keep the form simple and with the possibility to give open-ended responses. Make those questions optional, and let unsubscribers know their feedback will help you become better.

You can also capture user feedback on the unsubscribe page by quickly building and running VWO’s on-page surveys.

  • Offer alternative subscription plans

Some users might disagree with the frequency of messages they get from your organization. Or, they’d like to choose the types of emails to get from you. Use an “unsubscribe” page to offer them alternative subscription plans and the opportunity to change newsletter preferences. And yet, the “Unsubscribe” option should still be there.

But what is the best alternative? The answer to that lies in testing/experimentation. Use A/B tests to show different alternatives and deploy the ones that are most suitable to your business.

  • Take leads to other channels

Unsubscribing from your newsletters, users might still want to hear from your organization but from channels other than email. Show them other possibilities to stay in touch with your brand: add social media buttons, links to your community, or landing pages to your “unsubscribe” page design. Motivate consumers to stay with you there.

  • Make them rethink unsubscription

When designing your “unsubscribe” page, please keep in mind all possible scenarios. Sometimes, a user might hit the link by accident, with no intention to unsubscribe. Or, they might change their mind on the way to the page. 

Or, you can offer them some added value so they would like to stay with you. Think of a final, too-good-to-refuse offer. In the beginning, write a friendly text saying you’re sad to lose the subscriber. Come up with a reason that could make them think twice about breaking up with your organization.

  • Reinforce brand identity

Unsubscription from your newsletters shouldn’t make you give up caring about the user experience. As you know, a customer journey goes far beyond subscribing and unsubscribing to emails. Use the design of an “unsubscribe” page to reflect the corporate identity of your organization. Personalize it, thank a user for the time together, show that you still care — it’s all about your brand authenticity and reputation.

How to design “unsubscribe” pages to make them work

And now, for the most interesting part –

Depending on your business goals, from those mentioned earlier, consider the following tips on designing an “unsubscribe” page to get the most out of it.

  1. Brand it

Make sure your “unsubscribe” page looks original and refers to your brand identity. Please don’t make it another gray “You’ll no longer receive our emails” web page. Design it with brand colors, images, icons, and any other key brand assets.

Online graphic design tools, instruments like an icon maker, and libraries of customizable email and web templates will help you brand a page the best way possible.

  1. Allow staying with you

When designing, please avoid one-click unsubscribe buttons – create a page where a user can confirm the cancellation. Therefore, you’ll save consumers from accidental unsubscriptions. Make sure that your unsubscribe page is in compliance with internet laws (like GDPR, CCPA, etc.) that matter to you.

Also, a good practice would be organizing your “unsubscribe” page so that visitors might change their decision and re-subscribe again. Present a field or a bright “re-subscribe” button after final confirmation. You never know the user’s true intentions, so always leave yourself a chance to recapture those in doubt.

  1. Add personality and compliments

Personal touch and compliments are what matters, especially when it comes to sincere goodbye. Make your “unsubscribe” page clean, simple, up to a point, yet personal. Users should know you’re sad that they are leaving, but you understand and value their decision.

Think of writing a text that would look and sound like a human, not a robot. Avoid long paragraphs with professional slang and jargon in complex sentences. Use words with a positive context to win subscribers’ favor, but remember your brand tone of voice.

A charismatic image or GIF, brand colors and fonts, and a straightforward but honest message — all of them promote your brand identity and make users remember your organization even after they’ve unsubscribed.

  1. Use humor if appropriate

Interactive content elements such as GIFs, quizzes, memes, and short videos are your chance to grab users’ attention and motivate them to take the desired action. Consider implementing them in an “unsubscribe” page design if the communication tone of your brand allows it.

Even if a user still decides to unsubscribe, such content tricks are a great way to humanize the experience, make them smile, and build a positive image of your brand. They’ll leave your email subscription with a complimentary view, which is critical for marketers working on brand awareness and trust.

But there’s a catch.

Humor is a subjective thing, so be careful when choosing jokes or funny memes/videos for your “unsubscribe” page. Use them only if you’re sure the target audience is on the same wavelength as you. The best option would be to use A/B testing to understand a user’s reaction to such content.

  1. Offer alternatives. Always

When designing your “unsubscribe” page, leave room for words or buttons that would allow you to hold users.

  • Allow them to choose what they want to get from you: Offer alternative subscription plans or an opportunity to pick the frequency of getting your brand emails.
  • Include links to buttons to your social media accounts: It will help you hook users and convert them via alternative communication channels.
  • Add links to your landing pages: Play on their FOMO (fear of missing out), engaging them to visit your website once again.

In a word

An “unsubscribe” page is not just for confirmation that a consumer wants to leave your organization. When designed right, it can make subscribers change their mind, take them to other sales channels, or offer them alternative options to stay with your brand and therefore optimize your conversion rate by far.

Do your best to brand it for better identity and user experience, add personality and humor whenever appropriate (remember to test it to see how it goes), and think of a “What’s in there for me?” option to offer on the page that motivates unsubscribers to stay.

How One Simple Strategy Changed the Candy Industry

A century ago, Edward Noble sold billions of Life Savers in a few years with a different approach to marketing mints.
The post How One Simple Strategy Changed the Candy Industry appeared first on Neuromarketing.

pep-o-mint mobile

A century ago, Edward Noble sold billions of Life Savers in a few years with a different approach to marketing mints.

The post How One Simple Strategy Changed the Candy Industry appeared first on Neuromarketing.

When Lead Generation Trumps Helping Customers | #FrictionHunter

Turning a chat request into a lead generation process adds friction and annoys customers.
The post When Lead Generation Trumps Helping Customers | #FrictionHunter appeared first on Neuromarketing.

Frustrating customer experience #CX

Turning a chat request into a lead generation process adds friction and annoys customers.

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Free Guide: How to Strategize & Execute Profitable Personalization Campaigns

When I speak with our clients, it often strikes me how many of them feel overwhelmed by the very idea of personalization. Our imagination, often fueled by the marketing teams of various software companies, creates a perfect world where personalization enables every interaction to be completely custom for every individual. In this dreamland, artificial intelligence […]

The post Free Guide: How to Strategize & Execute Profitable Personalization Campaigns appeared first on Brooks Bell.

When I speak with our clients, it often strikes me how many of them feel overwhelmed by the very idea of personalization.

Our imagination, often fueled by the marketing teams of various software companies, creates a perfect world where personalization enables every interaction to be completely custom for every individual. In this dreamland, artificial intelligence and machine learning solve all our problems. All you have to do is buy a new piece of software, turn it on, and…BOOM: 1:1 personalization.

As a data scientist, I’ll let you in on a little secret: that software only provides the technological capability for personalization. Even further, the algorithms found within these tools simply assign a probability to each potential experience that maximizes the desired outcome, given the data they have access to. Suffice to say, they’re not as intelligent as you are led to believe.

If you caught our first post in this series, you already know that we define personalization a bit more broadly, as any differentiated experience that is delivered to a user based on known data about that user. This means personalization exists on a spectrum: it can be one-to-many, one-to-few, or one-to-one.

And while there are many tools that enable you to do personalization from a technical standpoint, they don’t solve for one of the main sources of anxiety around personalization: strategy

Most personalization campaigns fail because of a lack of a strategy that defines who, where and how to personalize. So I’ve put together a free downloadable guide to help you do just that. This seven-page guide is packed full of guidelines, templates and best practices to strategize and launch a successful personalization campaign, including:

  • Major considerations and things to keep in mind when developing your personalization strategy.
  • More than 30 data-driven questions about your customers to identify campaign opportunities.
  • A template for organizing and planning your personalization campaigns.
  • Guidelines for determining whether to deliver your campaigns via rule-based targeting or algorithmic targeting.

Free Download: Plan & Launch Profitable Personalization Campaigns.

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Who’s Hiring in December?

Here are our picks: Sr. Director – Customer Experience Leader – Equifax is looking for a Senior Director in St. Louis, Missouri, to lead the Customer Experience Team in “intuitive design workflows and overall customer experience as they interact with Workforce Solution products.” Senior Software Engineer, Build Automation – Blizzard Entertainment is “seeking a talented […]

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Here are our picks:

Sr. Director – Customer Experience Leader – Equifax is looking for a Senior Director in St. Louis, Missouri, to lead the Customer Experience Team in “intuitive design workflows and overall customer experience as they interact with Workforce Solution products.”

Senior Software Engineer, Build Automation – Blizzard Entertainment is “seeking a talented and enthusiastic software engineer to join the Hearthstone team” in Irvine, California to improve testing, building and developing Hearthstone through software automation.

Conversion Optimization Specialist – Vivint Smart Home is looking for an “action-oriented thought leader to partner with the digital marketing channel manager to optimize ad creative, product lifts in on-page response rates and improve conversion rates for Vivint’s digital marketing portfolio.” in Provo, Utah.

Head Of Customer Marketing – Kabbage is “looking for an extremely analytical, results-oriented leader to join their data science team in Atlanta with a passion for growing customer relationships and increasing the value of customer marketing.”

Associate Director of Experimentation – Marketing Analytics – Join Walmart in San Bruno, California and “help the World’s largest omni-channel retailer develop, promote and lead execution of a rigorous testing and experimentation roadmap.”

Senior Product Manager, Data & Analytics – In New York, HBO is “looking for someone who has a proven track record of leading teams to identify unique market and consumer requirements, with experience in digital products portfolio management.”

Digital Product Manager – Cole Haan is looking for a manager in New York to “own the front-end digital site experience on ColeHaan.com and drive the overall user experience, optimization efforts and road map.”

UX Manager (E-Commerce) – iHerb is looking for a UI/UX Manager in Orange County, California to “enhance iHerb’s customer experience on their industry-leading, global e-commerce site through design and maintenance.”

Senior Manager, UX Planning & Insights – Join Leapfrog Online’s Strategy & Insights team in Evanston, Illinois and “help lead the strategy and cross-channel, digital user experience planning for Leapfrog clients.

Senior, UX Development – Fidelity Investments is looking for a web developer in Durham, North Carolina to join the User Experience Design team.  This role will be “supporting the Health Care Group’s digital employee and employer platforms, which customers and plan sponsors use to manage their health and welfare benefits.”

Looking for a job or to fill a position?  Give us a shout and we’ll help spread the word in our next careers blog post.

 

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New Features in Illuminate: Impact Analysis, Enhanced Filters, Updated Dashboard & More

Since we launched Illuminate back in May, our team has been working around the clock to develop even more features to help optimization teams better organize experiments, report performance and maximize impact. Today, we’re excited to share a few of these with you. What’s new in Illuminate? Show impact and determine priority Use our new Impact […]

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Since we launched Illuminate back in May, our team has been working around the clock to develop even more features to help optimization teams better organize experiments, report performance and maximize impact. Today, we’re excited to share a few of these with you.

What’s new in Illuminate?

Show impact and determine priority

Use our new Impact Analysis to show the overall impact of your tests by page type and identify where you should be focusing your testing efforts.

Sort and filter by what matters most

Filter your tests by 15 attributes including target audience, page type, start and end date, KPIs, revenue impact and more. Not seeing what you need? Add your own using our new custom tagging feature.

Keep sight of the bigger picture

Our new dashboard view enables you to view your program’s overall performance or view performance by a specific team or line of business.

+ a new tiled layout

If you love a good masonry layout (á la Pinterest), then you’re going to love our updated experiment view. Easily switch between a basic list of your experiments or a super slick-looking tiled layout.

Many of these features were developed in response to feedback from our beta users, bringing more of Brooks Bell’s advanced experimentation methodologies directly into the software.

“With Illuminate, you’re not just getting another test repository,” said Suzi Tripp, Senior Director of Innovative Solutions at Brooks Bell. “You’re getting 15 years of experimentation expertise and proven frameworks to help you do more, and do it better.”

Interested in learning more about illuminate? Learn more on our website or schedule a demo using the form below.

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Built to Wow: An Introduction to Launching Personalization At Your Company

The promise of personalization is enticing: a complete 1-to-1 experience for every customer, driven by every detail and data point about that person: who they are, their interests, needs and history. Their customer experience is completely optimized to deliver the right content at the right time, influencing brand engagement, purchase activity and “wow”-worthy customer experiences. […]

The post Built to Wow: An Introduction to Launching Personalization At Your Company appeared first on Brooks Bell.

The promise of personalization is enticing: a complete 1-to-1 experience for every customer, driven by every detail and data point about that person: who they are, their interests, needs and history. Their customer experience is completely optimized to deliver the right content at the right time, influencing brand engagement, purchase activity and “wow”-worthy customer experiences.

For years, this vision has been a pipedream among marketers, product managers and customer experience professionals. Many clients come to us wanting to “do personalization” but face significant challenges in doing so.

Part of this is due to the fact that “personalization” is so ill-defined.

At Brooks Bell, we define personalization as any experience that is delivered to a user based on known data about that person. By that definition, personalization exists on a spectrum: it can be one-to-few, one-to-many, or one-to-one. In the digital environment, product recommendations, customized search results and even segmented experiences are all considered examples of personalization.

But while many companies are already implementing these experiences, there’s still an overwhelming sense that many brands have yet to arrive in terms of personalization.


Got a bunch of burning questions about personalization? Submit them using the form below.

We’ll use this information to make sure we cover these topics in our upcoming posts.


A 2018 study of 300 marketers by Evergage and Researchscape International found that 98% of respondents believe personalization helps advance customer relationships, but only 12% were “very” or “extremely” satisfied with the level of personalization in their marketing efforts.

This is because (not unlike experimentation) personalization is a business strategy that should evolve in order to deliver long-term value. And while it’s true that many brands already have the ability to do personalization, they’ve also found that elevating and scaling a personalization program is difficult, costly and, frankly, can feel pretty darn impossible.

So, how to do this? In addition to the fundamentals for a standard optimization program, there are three critical working components that need to be established for personalization:

  • Technology: you need top-notch tools to centralize user profiles and deliver personalized experiences;
  • Data: personalization requires a clean, unified view of relevant customer attributes, and
  • Strategy: you need research and planning to purposefully and effectively launch, scale and benefit from personalization.

In the coming weeks, we’re going to break down personalization further by each of these components. We’ll outline the best practices, advice, strategies and tips to go from scrappy to smart when it comes to introducing and scaling personalization at your organization.

Struggling to execute a scalable personalization strategy? We can help. Contact us to schedule a free 30-minute consultation.

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