2019 Data-Driven Marketing & Advertising Outlook

It’s hardly a secret that marketing executives of all types are using more data. Data is more powerful than ever, driving decision-making and informing strategy. For the third consecutive year, Dun & Bradstreet has partnered with Adweek to gain a deeper understanding of how B2B brands are approaching data-driven marketing. From its impact on ABM […]

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It’s hardly a secret that marketing executives of all types are using more data. Data is more powerful than ever, driving decision-making and informing strategy.

For the third consecutive year, Dun & Bradstreet has partnered with Adweek to gain a deeper understanding of how B2B brands are approaching data-driven marketing. From its impact on ABM to programmatic, the 2019 Marketing & Advertising Outlook shines a light on today’s biggest challenges. Read this report to find out:

  • How B2B marketers are using technology in their marketing stacks.
  • The most crucial marketing and advertising priorities for 2019.
  • How data is impacting ABM and the state of programmatic advertising.
  • The differences between how B2B brands and agencies use data.

Visit Digital Marketing Depot to download “2019 Data-Driven Marketing & Advertising Outlook from Dun & Bradstreet.”

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Key takeaways for brands after Google Marketing Live 2019

Digital giant bets big on shoppable ads, cross-app campaigns and real-time intelligence.

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There were a couple of telling stats from this week’s Google Marketing Live event, which included many digital ad product announcements and was attended by around 5,000 industry players in San Francisco. In a Google-led study, the tech giant sussed out one particular shopper who wanted to buy a single pair of jeans—the person spent 73 days looking and interacted with more than 250 digital touchpoints (searches, video views and page views) before making a purchase. The modern customer journey can be long and complicated, indeed.

This reality underscores the need for a wide range of customer intelligence—from social media listening and email insights to call data—so brands can act with as much relevance and real-time empathy as possible. Google, as much as any martech or adtech player, understands this need all too well and wants to make it easier for marketers to meet customers where they are at in the shopping cycle.

Now that Google Marketing Live is coming to a close, let’s take a look at the new ad products, stats and takeaways that marketing practitioners need to know.

Ads get more visual across apps

Google Discover, which has been the search engine’s news feed since September, now offers brands ad placements that are swipeable, carousel-style images that Instagram initially popularized a few years ago. Marketers can place the ads on not only Google Discover but also the YouTube home feed and the Gmail promotions tab.

Google also promises that these ads will get smarter and smarter due to machine learning. All told, these developments should be attractive if you’re a brand marketer who wants to run cross-app initiatives that strategically use the Alphabet-owned platforms’ wealth of data.

Advertisers should also pay attention to Gallery ads. Also similar to Instagram’s carousel ads, they are designed to be visually stimulating promos and will render at the top of mobile search results. They entail a scrollable gallery that will include four to eight images and up to 70 characters available for every photo. (Search Engine Land first reported on the emergence of these ads in February.)

Advertisers gain control over KPIs

Notably, Google has made moves on the data front to help ad buyers feel more in control over their campaigns. You can now choose what kinds of conversions (sales, lead-gen, email signups, webinar registrations, etc.) you want as your key performance indicator (KPI) at the campaign level.

Additionally, you can adjust conversion values based on the audiences you want to target. This ability will let you better tweak your ad bidding, which should improve ROI.

Ad tools improve efficiency for marketers on the go

The entire digital advertising ecosystem has gradually moved toward the smartphone mindset, letting you manage your campaigns from almost anywhere. In a growing number of instances, all you need to build and buy ads is a wireless signal. These mobile features help busy, often-traveling campaign managers get their work done in an efficient way.

With all of that in mind, Google now lets you build responsive search ads directly from its Google Ads mobile app. En route to a client meeting across town in a taxi cab but need to launch a last-minute holiday campaign? Google’s Android and iOS app now lets you write the search copy, optimize the headline, place bids and set budget constraints from your smartphone.

Timely data and alerts boost performance

Once again, Google recognizes that marketers aren’t always going to be in front of their laptop or at work. The Google Ads mobile app will now send notifications that alert you of a campaign’s performance as well as when better ad opportunities may be afoot.

Google clearly wants ad buyers to make use of their real-time intelligence. For instance, when certain keywords are performing poorly, you will be able to pause part or all of a campaign. And the app will offer you recommendations that can help drive sales. As one possible example, if you are a sneakers retailer and inventory for the white-hot shoe “Nike Air Presto” is unusually abundant—and therefore lower in cost on the bidding platform—the app will ping you to let you know of the opportunity. Google ad buyers of all sizes should appreciate such information, and the feature underscores how data is transforming all of marketing.

Local ads prove successful

While more and more sales happen online, 88% of all retail still happens offline. Therefore, retailers want their digital ads to not just drive ecommerce but also foot traffic to stores.

In recent years, Google, Facebook, Snapchat and other digital platforms have been working to prove that their ads help drive bricks-and-mortar sales. So, it was intriguing to see Google trot out brand-based statistics ahead of Google Marketing Live and during the show. The most impressive data point offered: Quick-serve giant Dunkin’ increased monthly store visits in some locations by 400% with Google’s location-based advertising.

 

Such revelations signal that hyperlocal marketing has gone multichannel, and advertisers of all sizes are now using digital to not only drive store visits but also sales in other offline channels like inbound phone calls.

Retail ads expanded

It’s clear Google wants a bigger chunk of retail advertising budgets as it competes with Amazon’s growing ad business.

Google revealed that its Showcase Shopping Ads, first debuted in 2017, have gone from being available for regular search results to the image search results, the discover search results and YouTube.

Showcase Shopping ads are similar to Galley Ads in that they offer the ability to include multiple product images that are scrollable from left to right. The ads also offer an easy way for consumers to click through to a product page and then commence to check out.

Marketers: stay ahead of the digital game

Google Marketing Live 2019 shows the brand marketing community continuing to march toward shoppable ads, tools for the mobile-minded practitioner, and improved targeting that leverages location data and granular performance metrics. For Google’s part, the ad products shown off represent the search engine giant’s desire to become a bigger player in retail.

It’s clear that Google is trying to advance how competitive it will be with Facebook, Amazon, and others for brand marketers’ ad dollars in the coming months—especially the holiday season. For all nearly all marketers, it’s imperative to keep pace as the available tools and best practices change at lightning speed.

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The top 4 digital challenges facing consumer brands – and how to solve them

Large consumer brands are losing share to more nimble, digitally savvy challengers. With one click, consumers can have nearly anything delivered to their door — from beds to laundry detergent to pet food. Digital disruptors such as Casper and Dollar Shave Club operate with ultra-fast supply chains, using digital channels to create convenient and authentic […]

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Large consumer brands are losing share to more nimble, digitally savvy challengers. With one click, consumers can have nearly anything delivered to their door — from beds to laundry detergent to pet food. Digital disruptors such as Casper and Dollar Shave Club operate with ultra-fast supply chains, using digital channels to create convenient and authentic shopping experiences.

How do traditional consumer goods marketers compete? And how do you overcome the impact of generic brands and point-of-sale data collection to grow digital sales and customer loyalty?

Join our brand marketing experts as they tackle the biggest challenges facing consumer goods companies – and provide the strategies and tactics that will help you win.

Register today for “The Top 4 Digital Challenges Facing Consumer Brands – And How to Solve Them,” produced by Digital Marketing Depot and sponsored by Mapp Digital.

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Beyond call tracking: Measuring sentiment for marketing success

Call analytics can be a touchy subject among some marketing teams, particularly those that have strained relationships with the sales team of their organizations. The tension between the two departments often leaves a gap between our teams that, when bridged, create valuable insights into cross-channel campaign effectiveness and sales results. Thanks to the rise of […]

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Call analytics can be a touchy subject among some marketing teams, particularly those that have strained relationships with the sales team of their organizations. The tension between the two departments often leaves a gap between our teams that, when bridged, create valuable insights into cross-channel campaign effectiveness and sales results. Thanks to the rise of mobile in e-commerce, digital marketers need to incorporate call analytics into their reporting strategies to tell the whole story of the customer journey.

Go beyond basic call tracking

According to research from Forrester, customers who call tend to buy more, make purchases quicker and remain customers longer than customers from other channels. Customers who initiate an inbound phone call during the customer journey convert an average of 30 percent faster — and spend an average of 28 percent more.

Having a handle on customer sentiment will significantly improve your holistic digital strategy. You know what your customers “do” with your campaigns, but how do they “feel” towards your brand? What happened when they called? What was the salesperson’s impression of the customer’s attitude towards him or her? Understanding the conversational context in which the sales team engages with them can help you better understand these factors and identify signals of intent (or attrition).

Amanda Farley, partner at SS Digital Media, recommends that marketers with the bandwidth listen in to sales calls — with both positive and negative outcomes — to better understand the conversation that drove the result. “There is usually a disconnect between marketing campaigns and the people answering the phone,” she said. “The messaging on the ads might be clear about who a brand is, but it’s really about how phone calls are facilitated.” Establishing this practice, according to Farley, can create valuable learnings for sales and marketing teams and improve the experience for inbound callers.

On smaller teams, dedicating a marketer to listen in on recorded phone calls might not be feasible. However, working with the sales team to provide visibility into your digital campaigns can be a step in the right direction towards understanding the context of inbound calls. Enabling the sales team with a process and the right tools to do this; for example, custom fields can be added to your CRM to capture the information.

More advanced organizations with systems already in place can take advantage of natural language processing features to perform on-call analysis of spoken words and phrases that have been identified as signals of conversion intent.

Create sentiment-informed campaigns

Analytics provide a healthy performance analysis, but they lack the contextual elements of what the customer’s experience with your brand was. Conversation analytics are an example of measurable insights that we can use to determine messaging, identify strengths and weaknesses, assess campaign effectiveness and measure customer sentiment.

Customer sentiment should be considered when you are developing segmentation strategies for email campaigns, designing landing pages and marketing automation. Messaging, for example, can be explicitly written to serve the individual’s needs based on their sentiment rating. If a salesperson indicates a customer has a negative experience, use the event as a trigger to initiate a win-back campaign — before the customer hangs up for good.

It’s all about the relationships

Our relationships with sales can present many challenges for organizations of all sizes — from using siloed platforms to being in different physical locations, it can be difficult to establish rapport with other teams. However, building that relationship is a critical element to optimizing and truly understanding call analytics and customer sentiment. Partnering with sales to clearly define and align goals improves the holistic sales and marketing strategy with the added layer of customer-data to help influence campaigns.  Adding the measurement of customer sentiment to this will provide new opportunities for your teams to share valuable insights, better understand customers and foster better relationships with them.

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Safari’s ITP lead on Chrome’s tracking prevention: It ‘has a long way to go’

His comments highlight the differences in how the two browsers are approaching restrictions on cross-site tracking.

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John Wilander, Apple Webkit engineer and architect of Safari’s Intelligent Tracking Prevention (ITP) solution, said Wednesday that Chrome’s new approach to privacy and cookie handling will do little to stop trackers.

Google announced Tuesday that it is changing the way its Chrome browser handles third-party cookies and will more aggressively aim to limit fingerprinting. It will require developers to identify cookies that are allowed to work across sites and potentially could be used to track users with a mechanism based on the web’s SameSite cookie attribute. Cookies without the new SameSite attribute will not be available in a third-party context. The browser will later introduce tools to allow users to block or clear third-party cookies and keep first-party cookies to stay logged in and retain site settings.

“What Chrome has announced is a change to their default cookie policy, going from allowing third-party cookie access to not allowing it,”  Wilander said in a Twitter thread. “However, developers can simply reconfigure their cookies to opt out [of] this new policy and we should expect all trackers to do so immediately.”

Wilander said while he sees Chrome’s willingness to “acknowledge that tracking is a problem on the web” and make changes as positive steps, it’s not going far enough. “For a cookie policy to have meaningful effect on cross-site tracking,” he wrote, “you also need to partition storage available to third-parties such as LocalStorage, IndexedDB, ServiceWorkers, and cache.” Safari has enabled this kind of partitioning to prevent cross-site tracking in a third-party context since 2013.

He pointed to a 2013 WebKit bug tracker page on cache partitioning in which a Chrome engineer — back when Chromium used Webkit — essentially asked to be able to opt out of the partitioning because “the cache partitioning feature is not supported by the consensus of the WebKit project.” Just over a month later, Google forked WebKit and launched Blink, its rendering engine still used by Chromium.

ITP cross-site cookie blocking. Safari introduced ITP in 2017 to block third-party trackers from capturing cross-site browsing data — chiefly preventing retargeting efforts. “ITP detects which domains have the ability to track the user and either deletes all of their cookies and website data, or blocks third-party cookie access,” said Wilander. The latest versions, 2.1 and 2.2, go further to keep third-party cookies from abusing first-party storage space, he added.

“This is all to say that Chrome has a long way to go if they are serious about fighting tracking on the web,” Wilander said. “Their announced changes will not do anything now, but they are important steps because they show Chrome’s willingness to move.”

Why we should care. Wilander’s response can be seen simply as a jab at a rival, but it highlights the divergent approaches to — and attitudes toward — tracking by Apple and Google. Apple has long staked out an anti-tracking stance, and ITP’s escalating restrictions have marketers scrambling to understand the impact on retargeting and analytics.

Chrome’s approach is significant given Google’s decade-long role in data collection and tracking. Privacy was a theme of I/O this week  (supported by a New York Times op-ed by CEO Sundar Pichai Tuesday) and spanned multiple products, including more location data controls in Android and products such as search and Maps.

That said, Chrome’s cookie handling change is relatively small and likely just a first step. With both a developer component — which may invite workarounds as Wilander suggests — and a user component that may or may not be widely adopted. It’s entirely unclear how much of a shakeup this will mean for marketers. But two different approaches means marketers will need to have both eyes open.

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Google’s Chrome will change cross-site cookie handling, ‘aggressively’ tackle fingerprinting

Though the cookie is exceeding its shelf-life, the change stands to further shake up marketers’ remarketing, analytics and attribution efforts.

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As expected, Google announced coming changes to the way its Chrome browser handles cookies and addresses fingerprinting on Tuesday at its annual I/O developer conference. New tools in Chrome will allow users to block or clear third-party cookies more easily, Google said. The company also announced a browser extension that will show more information about parties involved in ad transactions and tracking.

Chrome’s new cookie handling. Google said “blunt approaches” to cookie blocking haven’t been effective for users because they treat all cookies alike — from first-party cookies used to keep users signed-in to sites to third-party cookies used for tracking — so it’s changing how cookies work in Chrome.

From a security standpoint, Google said this change will also help protect cookies from cross-site injection and data disclosure attacks by default. Eventually, Google said, Chrome will limit cross-site cookies to HTTPS connections.

In the coming months, developers will be required to specify explicitly which cookies are able to work across sites and potentially used to track users through a new mechanism based on the web’s SameSite cookie attribute. The SameSite attribute can be used to restrict cookies to first-party or same-site context.

In the weeds. Chrome 76 will include a new same-site-by-default-cookies flag, according to web.dev. Cookies without the SameSite attribute will not be available in a third-party context. Developers will need to declare cookies that need to be available on third-party sites to Chrome with SameSite=None. Google says this will allow Chrome users to clear cross-site cookies and leave single domain cookies used that are used for logins and site settings in tact.

Developers can start testing their sites to see how the cookie-handling changes will affect their sites in the latest developer version of Chrome.

Cracking down on fingerprinting. The company also said it is taking further measures to restrict browser fingerprinting methods that are used as workarounds to keep tracking in place when users opt out of third-party cookies.

Google said Chrome plans to “aggressively restrict” browser fingerprinting and reduce the ways browsers can be passively fingerprinted. “Because fingerprinting is neither transparent nor under the user’s control, it results in tracking that doesn’t respect user choice,” said Google.

The company added that it doesn’t use fingerprinting for personalizing ads or allow fingerprinting data to be imported into its ad products.

User cookie controls. Google said it will provide users will more information about how sites are using cookies and give them simpler controls for managing cross-site cookies. The company didn’t say what these changes will look like in the Chrome interface, but said it will preview the features for users later this year.

Ad data browser extension. The company also announced it is developing an open-source browser extension that will show the names of ad tech players involved in an ad transaction as well as the companies with ad trackers attached to an ad. The extension will also show the factors used for personalization. That will be the same information Google shows when you click “Why this ad”.

Why we should care. The end of digital advertising ecosystem’s reliance on cookies for tracking and attribution has been a long time coming. Cookies aren’t supported on mobile apps, and the mobile web and apps now account for the majority of ad spend. Google and Facebook have led a shift away from cookies to relying on deterministic IDs of signed-in users.

Chrome is not a first mover in this realm, either. It’s following in Apple’s Intelligent Tracking Prevention (ITP) footsteps. The latest version, ITP 2.2, will limit cross-site cookie tracking of users in Safari to one day. Earlier this week, Microsoft announced its Chromium-based Edge browser will also have new tracking controls for third-party cookies.

For marketers, the full impact of these changes and how users respond to the tools likely won’t be seen for months, but stand to have a significant impact on remarketing, analytics and attribution efforts. It’s also unclear if (or how much) Chrome’s new requirements will benefit Google with its first-party relationships with billions of users over other ad tech firms, as the Wall Street Journal has predicted.

The Chrome announcements come amid a broader PR campaign by Google aimed at would-be U.S. regulators. Google CEO Sundar Pichai published an op-ed in The New York Times Tuesday night titled “Privacy should not be a luxury good” in which he reiterated Google’s position that “a small subset of data helps serve ads that are relevant and that provide the revenue that keeps Google products free and accessible” and listed ways in which the company addresses user data. Pichai called for federal data privacy legislation in the vein of the EU’s GDPR. Google reportedly began lobbying for a “friendly” version of a federal law last summer.

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Identity Resolution: Secrets to Success

Today’s consumers operate in real time. With hundreds of options available and purchases being made in seconds, the need to be in front of these consumers at the moment of decision is more critical than ever. You need to know who your consumers are at the moment of both inbound and outbound engagement to provide […]

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Webinar!Today’s consumers operate in real time. With hundreds of options available and purchases being made in seconds, the need to be in front of these consumers at the moment of decision is more critical than ever. You need to know who your consumers are at the moment of both inbound and outbound engagement to provide in-the-moment, personalized experiences.

Join Infutor Data Solutions and Signal for a fireside discussion on how top brands are resolving identity and personalizing engagements during the key moments in the customer journey.

Register today for “Identity Resolution: Secrets to Success,” produced by Digital Marketing Depot and sponsored by Infutor.

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Why you want ‘clumpy’ binge-buying customers

By understanding binge purchasing, you can uncover a new metric to measure and predict CLV – and choose which customers to focus on and when.

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We’ve all heard of the term the “hot hand” in the context of sports. Basketball players go from missing every shot, to scoring in streaks. Sometimes players are in such a “zone” that he or she seemingly can’t miss a shot. Baseball players also tend to hit home runs in bunches.

Throughout my career and through my research at Wharton, I’ve studied the phenomenon of the “hot hand” as it relates to the way consumers tend to buy products and services or consume content. Simply put, customers who consume or buy content in bunches, then go away and come back and buy in bunches, are more valuable to companies than customers who buy at a steady pace.

Don’t believe me? Let’s take a deeper look at how measuring binge consumption by customers, or what I call “clumpiness,” can be applied to maximize Customer Lifetime Value, yielding stronger sales and marketing ROI over time.

Maximizing Customer Lifetime Value with clumpiness

CLV is universally accepted as a central tenet of marketing today. In both academia and practice, it is looked upon as a goal of firm value maximization. That is, more profitable firms recognize that CLV maximization yields greater cash flows and higher long-run profits.

Relatedly, mathematical models that allow these firms to predict CLV are commonly based on a framework commonly called RFM.

  •       Recency – How recently did a given customer make a purchase?
  •       Frequency – How often they made a purchase?
  •       Monetary Value – How much did they spend?

These are the cornerstones of CLV calculations and segmentation used by countless marketers and I’m here to tell you: They’re wrong!

Well, sort of. They are incomplete.

Through research, I have demonstrated and introduced that not only are RFM crucial components to calculating CLV; there is one additional dimension that MUST be factored in: clumpiness (C) or as some refer to it, binge consumption.

The hot hand

Let’s go back to the hot hand example and the player who is scoring points in bunches. Now, juxtapose over the world of marketing and consumers and you have clumpiness, AKA consumers who buy in bunches.

My research shows those who consume or buy content in bunches, then go away and come back and buy in bunches, are more valuable than other customers.

Let me put that another way. If a given brand knew both – how clumpy a consumer’s behavior is AND how frequently they buy – the better predictor when it comes to their future CLV is their clumpiness. I realize that may seem shocking, but it’s true. My research clearly illustrates that brands/marketers should be tracking someone’s clumpiness over time because that’s extraordinarily predictive of their CLV.

Across the board, marketers see far stronger results when they use RFMC data versus only using RFM. By focusing on clumpy consumers as their most valuable customers, brands can realize far stronger CLV and profitability.

With that overview in mind, let’s take a deeper look at what various brands have done to improve CLV and better target their marketing to encourage binge purchases by consumers.

Digital consumers behave more clumpily

We’re all familiar with binge-watching a series on Netflix, or other binge consumption of content from YouTube to gaming. But consumers have expanded this behavior beyond digital content and we’re now seeing it everywhere — from shared services such as AirBnB, Lyft and Uber to retail and online purchases.

A variety of different factors can drive clumpy behavior. In the case of content, the key driver is availability. For example, Netflix releases a new season of a given show, and suddenly everyone wants to watch it ASAP. They literally plan their lives around it.

Consumers can go weeks in between major purchases and then get the “hot hand” making multiple purchases or consuming an unusual amount of goods or services in a short period, or spending more money in a concentrated time.

The two sides of being clumpy and the demographic view

There are two types of clumpiness when it comes to consumers – visit clumpy and purchase clumpy. Consumers who are visit-clumpy are akin to the classic “window shoppers” of yesteryear. They visit both online and offline channels without necessarily making a purchase. In contrast, purchase-clumpy shoppers are far more valuable over time.

As a part of our research, we examined multiple retailers in specific product categories. Among the key findings were that millennials are more clumpy than other generations and that women are clumpier than men.

With marketers struggling to figure out how to market to millennials, this information can be helpful. By understanding clumpiness as a key facet of CLV, brands are turning the corner and seeing better results.

By understanding clumpy behavior, knowing to look for it and analyzing the level of clumpiness, marketers and other key decision makers gain a new metric for measuring and predicting CLV and choosing which customers to focus on and when. They can also gain a better understanding of customer satisfaction and react to it faster.

Defying the odds

When I first set out to conduct the research, I would have bet that the, findings would indicate that regular buyers were more loyal than those who buy in clumps. Well it turns out that my research, as well as others, suggests that regular buyers are in fact not more loyal.

Many times these are subscription customers and in fact, just buy without even thinking about their repurchase decision. A lot of research shows right now this is how you lose money. You take someone that buys in a regular pattern and try to upsell them because they don’t even think that they’re buying in a regular pattern.

We call it “poking the sleeping bear.” You poke somebody who’s just using your service regularly but isn’t even consciously … let’s say monthly making the decision to do so. And by your saying “Hey, why don’t you also buy …product?” “Holy cow! You mean I’m spending $300 a month on your product? Forget it! I cancel!” But your goal was to upsell them and instead you made them churn. So I’m not a strong believer in just observed loyalty. What appears to be observed loyalty over time, that’s not actually loyalty.

Final thoughts

I’m sure many of you reading this will have doubts. Many of you will want to stick to the tried-and-true RFM method and you are of course more than welcome to continue to do so. But I can tell you, without reservation, that if you do not begin to also factor in C (clumpiness), you will never get a true read on your customers.

Although recency/frequency/monetary value (RFM) segmentation framework, and its related probability models, remain a CLV mainstay, companies need to extend the framework to include clumpiness to predict future customer behavior successfully.

After studying thousands of data sets from companies across categories, we’ve found that C adds to the predictive power, above and beyond RFM and firm marketing action, of both the churn, incidence, and monetary value parts of CLV. Hence, we recommend a significant implementation change: from RFM to RFMC.

Measuring clumpiness has huge practical value. Clumpy consumers are worth more money and firms need to find them, and use marketing to drive customers to binge consume.

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Data, Data Everywhere — But Where are the Campaign Insights?

Marketers continue to be inundated from all sides about artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. But what good is it when your campaign data exists in silos and you can’t see the “big picture” to actually understand your customer engagement better and improve your marketing campaign results? It’s now time to capitalize on the real […]

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Webinar!Marketers continue to be inundated from all sides about artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. But what good is it when your campaign data exists in silos and you can’t see the “big picture” to actually understand your customer engagement better and improve your marketing campaign results?

It’s now time to capitalize on the real gains AI and machine learning (ML) can provide to unify, anticipate and activate the cross-channel insights that are hidden within your customer journeys.

Join our martech and data insights experts as they show you how to use AI and ML to drive pipeline and revenue growth. You’ll learn techniques to better plan, manage and execute your digital campaigns.

Register today for “Data, Data Everywhere — But Where are the Campaign Insights?” produced by Digital Marketing Depot and sponsored by conDati.

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