SEO is math

Looking to prove the value of SEO? Put math behind your budget asks by measuring the traffic potential for an SEO investment.

The post SEO is math appeared first on Search Engine Land.

SEO often doesn’t get a fair seat at the table when marketing budgets are determined. 

Even though SEO is marketing.

As we’re approaching a time when many companies are having meetings in their conference rooms to determine budget allocations for the upcoming year, I want to help further the case as to why SEO should have a voice in the room (and budget in your marketing plans).

But first, let me address a bit more why I feel SEO doesn’t get its fair shake.

Proving the value of SEO is complicated

SEO can be a challenge for some in marketing departments to wrap their heads around. There are many moving parts and it’s not as easy as PPC when you understand exactly how that works. 

With PPC it’s generally a matter of:

  • Choose keywords.
  • Write/ place ads.
  • Pay when someone clicks.
  • Send that click to a landing page of your choosing.
  • Report on results (sales/leads).

It’s true. SEO is more complex than this. And, because of its complexity, I will often instruct prospects to think carefully about not just when to invest in SEO, but whether SEO is even a really viable investment in the first place. Often, the answer to these questions is “it depends.” 

Remember, an investment in SEO doesn’t just revolve around hiring an agency or an individual in-house to oversee and drive the strategy.

Unlike PPC, there are many other considerations, including:

  • Web design and development that may be required, such as:
    • Creating a new architecture / navigational structure.
    • Creating new page templates to better support SEO.
    • Creating a blog/resource section on your website (if you don’t already have one).
  • Content, such as:
    • Page content.
    • Resourceful content.
    • Thought leadership, white papers or webinars.
  • PR and legal reviews:
    • Ensuring that content meets with company compliance needs (especially for medical/pharma/legal/insurance industries and other highly regulated industries).

Case in point: My agency has a client who’s engaged us to aid in the re-structuring of their website (including an audit of their existing presence versus that of a competitor).

The work coming out of this audit resulted in 130 hours worth of web development requirements this client needs to see through to completion in order for the investment that they’ve made with us to be substantiated. 

I highly recommend that you consult with a trusted friend/partner who has experience in SEO to help you to make this determination. Many SEOs (the nice ones 😊) would be happy to provide a free analysis/opportunity assessment. Take advantage of the advice.

Today, I’m going to assume that we’ve determined that there is an opportunity for SEO to provide value for your business. Undoubtedly, if you’re in the conference room trying to determine what – if anything – to budget for SEO, you will want to better understand:

  • The size of the opportunity.
  • The size of the investment needed to get you there. 

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Size of the opportunity

When determining the "value" of an SEO effort, there are two sides to the coin. 

One easy metric is to consider "replacement cost" of the traffic. If you were to buy this same traffic via PPC (that you’re considering targeting via SEO) what would it have cost? Semrush makes this available via their "Traffic Cost" metric:

Semrush traffic cost metric

This can sometimes be a big number, as we see for Search Engine Land. You may find that many of your competitors are realizing this kind of value, yet you aren’t. 

That may be as far as you need to go to make your case to the board that SEO is "worth the investment." That’s one way to measure it. 

Understanding the traffic potential of SEO efforts

But if you’re a mature marketer, you will try to move beyond just "click value" to something more meaningful. 

  • Tangible value.
  • Sales.
  • Leads.
  • Downloads of white papers. 
  • Sign-ups for webinars.

How you measure this will depend upon whether your business is ecommerce or B2B/lead gen. For both verticals, you'll need to do two things:

  • Identify the possible keywords that you’ll want to target.
  • Determine what it might take to compete (i.e., site structure/link acquisition).

Since I’m assuming that you’re a marketing head and perhaps not an SEO, here’s how I would quickly suggest you conduct this type of assessment. 

Using Semrush (subscription required), navigate your way to the Organic Research section. Here, you can enter the domains/website addresses for direct competitors who you believe are doing well with their organic presence. 

Once you’ve found a competitor who appears to have a significant organic presence, click into the Top Organic Keywords section and click View all organic keywords.

Semrush "View all organic keywords"

You will now see a complete list of your competitors’ keywords. But this will also include your competitors’ "brand" keywords (their company name, etc.). You need to filter this:

Semrush organic keywords advanced filters.

Still, though, this data isn’t great. It’s showing us any keywords that our competitor is ranking for within Google’s top 100 results.

Let’s make this more meaningful/useful by reducing that number down to rankings "which matter" (that’s a subjective metric). In this case, I’m going to only concern myself with the top 20 ranking keywords:

Semrush top 20 organic keywords

Now I have a workable list of keywords that I know are driving significant organic search traffic to my competitor(s):

Semrush keyword list

This shows me that:

  • There are 19,029 keywords ranking in Google’s top 20.
  • The "local guide program" is driving a large share of traffic to my competitor.
  • The "seo" keyword would have cost me approximately $6.20 cost per click if I were to buy that traffic via Google Ads. 

And, as mentioned previously, we can see the "value" of this competitors’ non-brand organic traffic, based on the "replacement cost" ("Traffic Cost"):

Semrush Traffic cost.

If you’re highly ambitious, this is the next step that you can take. Download the Top 20 Rankings list into a spreadsheet. 

Semrus top 20 keyword export.

Create columns into your spreadsheet to make some assumptions (i.e., Ranking Top 3; Ranking 4-7; Ranking 8-10; or you may want to get as detailed as to estimate each top 10 position). 

Since we have the estimated monthly search volume for each keyword, you can now multiply those numbers by the potential click-through rate of each potential/future rankings. 

Thanks to Backlinko’s work on average CTR in the Google SERP, we have some estimates:

Google Organic CTR breakdown by position.

SEO is an imperfect science. But this at least gives you some visibility into the traffic potential that exists for an investment. In short, it puts some math into the projections

Assessing SEO opportunities in ecommerce and B2B/lead gen

Now that you have at least an idea of the traffic potential, we need to break out the tasks for determining what potential "real" value might exist, in terms of things that are more tangible (sales/leads, etc.). 

For the purposes of this article, I’ll be focused on either an ecommerce website or a B2B/lead gen website.

Ecommerce opportunity assessment

If you’re an ecommerce website, you should have a general sense of:

  •  Conversion rate into a sale.
  • Average (net) value of a sale. 

Knowing these things, you can run some estimates on how much you might make based upon varying degrees of traffic increases. 

For instance:

  • 10,000 visits per month x 1.5% conversion rate into a sale = 150 sales. 
  • 150 sales x $300 average net value of a sale = $45,000 per month. 

Knowing this potential real value, you can then assess if the investment that you believe will be required in an SEO effort is "worth it." 

B2B/lead gen opportunity assessment

If you’re B2B/lead gen, you should have a sense of conversion rate into a lead (and hopefully you’re tracking form submissions, phone calls, chat/messaging apps and other "leads"/conversion types). 

Working with this and your internal data on conversion rates from lead to qualified lead and qualified lead to sale, you should be able to calculate the potential ROI. 

Taking the same traffic potential above (10,000), here’s what that calculation might look like:

  • 10,000 visitors x 5% conversion rate into a lead = 500 leads. 
  • Let’s say that ½ of those leads are qualified (500 x .5 = 250). 
  • Then, let’s say that we convert 40% of our qualified leads into a sale (250 x .4 = 100). 
  • So, we have 100 potential sales from the SEO investment. 

What’s our average net value of a sale? 

Every business is different. We have a client whose average net value of a sale is $400,000. That makes the ROI argument pretty easy to make. 

But let’s say that your average net value of a sale is $400. With 100 sales x $400, that’s $40,000 in net value from your SEO investment.

Knowing this, you can determine how much you can profitably invest into an SEO effort.

Putting the math in SEO

These formulas are far from perfect. But they provide an opportunity to put math behind what you’re asking for in an investment into an SEO effort. 

You should also caution those involved that SEO is not a quick fix. It may very well be that you’ll spend the first months of the effort in deep research before big changes occur. 

As mentioned above, other hard (internal) costs could be involved, such as a restructuring of your website, content additions, page additions and PR/thought Leadership items. Do your best to account for these things.

While there are certainly times when I have strongly recommended against a company investing in an SEO effort, it’s more often that you’ll know me as a champion of the channel. 

The post SEO is math appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Google Analytics 4: A breakdown of Demographic and Tech details reports

Google Analytics 4’s navigation might look bare compared to Universal Analytics. But here’s where you can find hidden reports in GA4.

The post Google Analytics 4: A breakdown of Demographic and Tech details reports appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Google Analytics 4 may look simple on the surface, but there’s more to it than meets the eye. Did you know that there are multiple reports hidden in GA4?

Out of the box, the left-side navigation in GA4 looks pretty bare.

There are only 18 reports vs. the 90+ (not including integration reports) in Universal Analytics. 

But contrary to popular belief, GA4 actually has a lot of the same reports built in.

The best examples of this are the GA4 Demographic details and Tech details reports.

Where the reports are in Universal Analytics

In Universal Analytics, these are all separate reports and each report is separated into subcategories as seen below.

Universal Analytics - Various reports separated in subcategories.

On top of this, UA sometimes has additional dimensions you can choose from.

For instance, you can switch to “City” instead of “Country.”

But this made it confusing to know whether a report was standalone or another dimension in a single report. 

Universal Analytics - Individual report or primary dimension change?

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The Demographics details report in GA4

Instead of multiple reports and a primary dimension change, GA4 combines all logical demographic dimensions into a single report, the Demographic details report.

The Demographics details report in GA4

The Tech details report in GA4

The same goes for the Tech details report.

The Tech details report in GA4

Here, you get 10 reports in one, including:

  • Browser
  • Device category
  • Device model
  • Screen resolution
  • App version
  • Platform
  • OS version
  • Platform / device category
  • Operating system
  • OS with version

Now that you know where some of your favorite and most used reports have moved to, hopefully, GA4 feels a little more comfortable.

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Webinar: CDP must-haves for your budget

First-party data management strategies that keep your customers’ data safe and your business booming.

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What’s best for you? A CDP out-of-the-box? Building a customer data solution yourself? There’s merit in both options, and this webinar is here to help you narrow down what’s best for your business.

Register today for “How to Decide to Build or Buy: A Customer Data Management Checklist,” presented by Acquia.

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4 smarter ways to measure SEO effectiveness

Basic SEO metrics aren’t effective indicators of success. Here’s how to level up your traffic, ranking, conversion and link KPIs.

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I find myself answering a lot of the same questions from new clients about ways to measure SEO. My answers generally fall into one of two categories:

  • Why basic/boilerplate SEO metrics aren’t good KPIs and how to make them better.
  • Which (more advanced) metrics we should establish to determine actual business impact.

This article will tackle the first category and show how to apply an advanced approach to make basic SEO KPIs far more effective indicators of success. The KPIs I’ll discuss include:

  • Traffic (visits)
  • Ranking
  • Conversions
  • Links

Let’s get started.

1. Traffic

Measuring SEO traffic week over week is as basic as it gets – and it’s missing nuances that can become clear with a couple of adjustments.

First, use Search Console to split traffic into brand and non-brand buckets.

Brand vs. non-brand chart in GSC.

There’s a simple reason for this: brand traffic is generally not a function of SEO. Instead, it’s influenced by awareness campaigns, including billboards, CTV (or linear TV) ads, programmatic campaigns, PR, and more. Brand search, in short, is a function of your overall marketing portfolio.

Non-brand search is where SEOs can shine, especially when you identify keywords at the most important stages of your funnel and prioritize them by potential impact. This often functions as the level of intent.

Educational keywords (e.g., “SEO best practices”) equate more or less to the top of the funnel and more transactional keywords (e.g., “best SEO agency for B2B”) align with the bottom of the funnel. 

Second, remember that seasonality impacts SEO as any other channel.

For this reason, it’s crucial to set up month over month, quarter over quarter, and year over year windows. I prefer QoQ and YoY over shorter comparisons.

Big SEO shifts, whether forced by an algorithm change or internally directed, require longer measurement cycles to prove real change.

2. Ranking

Relying on moment-in-time screenshots of your current keyword rankings will get you a limited idea of your overall campaign success.

Instead, consider these factors:

  • How are your target keywords ranking over time (MoM, QoQ, YoY)?
  • How are individual pages ranking?
  • Are you achieving actual milestones?
  • What are your trends?

Evaluating rankings over time will show you progress across possible calendar events and seasonal shifts. 

Instead of looking at a blended portfolio affecting a keyword, which offers less actionable insight, look at individual pages using Google Search Console. This allows you to isolate which specific properties are impacting rankings for a single keyword.

On the topic of milestones, not all ranking changes are created equal. You can move up 50 spots from 61 to 11, but that may have less impact than moving up a single notch from the top spot on page 2 of the SERPs to the last spot on page 1. 

Last, dig deeper to see the actual deltas of impressions and clicks that any rankings changes are driving. This also incorporates external trends. For instance, consider that you could have seen huge increases in impressions and clicks for “video conferencing software” in March 2020 without a change in your ranking for that keyword. 

The more activity around the keyword, the more competitive it will get – and the more potential impact it has on your portfolio.

3. Conversions

The 1.0 way to measure acquisition is to aggregate last-click conversions from organic search. Incorporating GA4, which uses a cross-channel, data-driven model with a 30-day lookback window for acquisition, will give you a more nuanced view of attributed credit for conversions. 

We could add many more layers here, including measuring the effects of SEO on other channels’ acquisition costs. 

For this post, which is meant to help you derive more meaning from relatively basic KPIs, let’s talk about building different conversion events aligned with the level of intent of the keywords you’re targeting (e.g., “download the guide” for educational keywords or “book a demo” for transactional ones). 

Your report might look like this:

GA4 conversion reporting.

Different conversion events, when used strategically with back-end CRM data, will have different values.

When you use a variety of conversion events that align strategically with your keywords, you should see an increase in conversion rate and get a more accurate picture of the value those keywords are driving.

Links are important. They’re still a ranking factor, and they can help measure the impact of your content.

That said, link quantity is a shallow metric. Links are simply a means to an end.

SEO’s overall purpose is to drive meaningful traffic and acquisition. Focusing on downstream KPIs without rolling them up to business impact (which is admittedly more complex) will do little to move the needle in important ways. 

If you focus on counting links, you’re incentivizing yourself to chase more links. The incentive should be actual impact.

Counting will give you a quantity bias and will shift the way you run your SEO program. If you focus on business drivers, you’ll be incentivized to deliver value, not volume

Volume is easy. Value is harder.

Prove the value of SEO with better metrics

For the most part, these are fairly easy adjustments to make, and they’ll help you paint a much clearer picture of the value you’re driving with your SEO program and how that’s trending over time.

In my next post, I’ll show how to take measurement to the next level by helping you understand how SEO is affecting your overall marketing efforts in relation to other channels. 

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Top 5 data feed errors that can sabotage your ecommerce campaigns

New research reveals what feed tactics retailers are using to increase their campaign performance – and where retailers go wrong.

The post Top 5 data feed errors that can sabotage your ecommerce campaigns appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Since the start of the pandemic, supply chain issues have caused panic among retailers. On average, 16% of products are out of stock and cannot be purchased. Industries such as vehicles (57%) and sporting goods (40%) are hit especially hard. There are also large differences in geographic locations, with Latin America experiencing one of the lowest levels of stock availability.

Interestingly, when excluding those out-of-stock items from a Google search campaign, advertisers typically see a 181% ROAS increase.

These statistics come from a new DataFeedWatch report based on insights from 4.5 million products, 15,000 shops and more than 60 countries. Uncovering industry trends, common errors and optimization tactics, the report provides retailers and advertisers with actionable data to evaluate their feeds, channels and strategy.

Data feed errors and common pitfalls

The most common feed issues often included missing or incorrect data and wrongly formatted attributes.

Magento merchants struggle with almost 10% of products affected by feed errors. Merchants using Magento struggle with having almost 10% of their advertised products affected by errors. This number exceeds the industry average of 7%.

BigCommerce and WooCommerce pull in 7.03% and 8.27% of all feed errors, respectively.

Shopify sellers record the best result of data feed health with only 5.47% disapproved listings. Interestingly, DataFeedWatch speculates that the volume of feed errors is likely an indicator of the level of data management complexity within the platform. 

Shipping and issues are responsible for 23.49% of all product ad disapprovals. Shipping is the most troublesome aspect of product data setup. The most common errors are too-high values and unspecified attributes like missing shipping country. 

Image attribute issues are responsible for 20.32% of all disapprovals. This is likely due to having a relatively high number of requirements. Top image errors include:

  • Promotional overlays on images.
  • Images that are too small.
  • Missing or invalid images.
  • Generic visuals. 

GTIN issues account for 5.5% errors. Submitting incorrect GTIN values, or skipping GTINs altogether accounts for just over 5% of issues. 

Title issues. 25.82% of titles across Google Shopping listings go above 70 characters. This means that reduced visibility can be an issue if titles are trimmed.

In Google Shopping, product titles have a total character allowance of 150, but are trimmed after 70 characters. Since 25.82% of titles across Shopping listings go above 70 characters, important product data may not be visible. 

Feed tactics

Most retailers use feed tactics to increase their campaign performance. When retailers advertise on multiple channels, different feed data may be required, increasing the likelihood of advertisers needing to leverage secondary data sources.

Whether you’re creating new titles or segmenting based on “bestsellers” or margins, optimizing data feeds has a positive effect on campaign performance.

Product titles are the most optimized pieces of data in a product feed. Out of all shops that had overwritten data, 14% of those changes were to the product titles. Advertisers either changed several keywords or rewrote the titles from scratch. 

Two out of five ecommerce advertisers use custom_labels to optimize their campaigns. 13% of those advertisers create product groups based on if the product is in an ongoing sale.

When advertisers segmented their feeds based on margins, they saw a 96% increase in ROAS.

64% of ecommerce businesses filter less profitable products. In almost all occurrences of merchants cutting products it’s because the prices drop below a certain threshold. 

Price is the #1 reason for removing products from campaigns. When excluding products from paid ads based on the item price, 90.92% of marketers choose to remove goods below a specified price point.

Only 9% of marketers filter products based on highest price points.

Over 25% of online merchants provide ad platforms with additional images. Additional images usually show the product from a different angle or with staging elements. This gives shoppers the best possible idea of what they’re buying and how the product can be used. 

At least one in 10 ecommerce advertisers supply additional product info in the feed by leveraging secondary data sources. Types of secondary data sources used include:

  • Inventory management systems
  • Analytics
  • Google Sheets

You can download the full PDF report from DataFeedWatch here. It includes more information on the current state of ecommerce shopping including tips for advertisers to optimize and enhance their feeds, choosing the right platforms and best practices for paid ad campaigns.

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Webinar: 5 ways to survive an uncertain economy

Consumer and market intelligence can help you stay afloat.

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Most marketers work day in and day out to stay on top of how their market is evolving, but just one unexpected factor can shift the entire trajectory of your industry.

Join this webinar for an eye-opening discussion about how to identify consumer concerns, determine market barriers and where potential gaps may be using consumer and market intelligence.

Register today for “Sink or Swim: 5 Ways to Survive a Struggling Economy,” presented by NetBase Quid.

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How to optimize the marketing KPIs moving the needle in e-commerce

Access this e-book and learn how performance marketers drive results with these proven strategies.

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In a world with tightening budgets, limited resources and a growing “do more with less” attitude, tracking performance metrics and optimizing them are more important than ever. Marketers, business leaders and other cost-center functions need to be able to show value and ROI on the spend in their programs, which is why meaningful KPI measurement is critical. In order to navigate the ever-changing waters ahead, it’s essential that leaders are laser-focused on the right KPIs for their business goals and needs—not vanity metrics.

“The Marketer’s Ultimate Guide to E-commerce Metrics” not only provides strategies for mapping out the KPIs that matter to your brand, but it also provides practical tips and ideas to optimize for those goals. The actionable recommendations in this guide have been built and tested in today’s e-commerce climate, so you can implement them straight away.

A few of the optimization insights you’ll find in this e-book include:

  • Ways to lift Average Order Value (AOV) by implementing product recommendation testing on product pages.
  • Strategies for boosting Customer Lifetime Value (CLTV) beyond the traditional loyalty rewards program (the e-book includes several dynamic examples).
  • Tactics for improving your Sales Conversion Rate (CVR) by creating a smoother ad-to-website experience and leaning into your CRO solution’s machine learning technology.
  • Methods based on machine learning and artificial intelligence to effectively lift KPIs like shopping cart abandonment rate.

Ready to quit making moves out of the same standard playbook, expecting different results? Start thinking outside the box by downloading The Marketers Ultimate Guide to E-commerce Metrics today and read up on fresh conversion strategies built for 2022 and beyond.


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Webinar: How to choose whether to build or buy with this CDP checklist

Learn first-party data management strategies that keep your customers’ data safe and your business booming.

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What’s best for you? A CDP out-of-the-box? Building a customer data solution yourself? There’s merit in both options, and this webinar is here to help you narrow down what’s best for your business.

Register today for “How to Decide to Build or Buy: A Customer Data Management Checklist,” presented by Acquia.

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Webinar: Harness first-party data for conversion

Learn how Hearst maximizes the power of audience intelligence to drive growth.

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In order to retain and grow existing customer relationships, leading organizations are betting on first-party data solutions that can drive impact for both acquisition and retention initiatives.

Join ActionIQ and Hearst’s VP of acquisition and conversion as they discuss how Hearst is unlocking value by leveraging its first-party data to drive conversion across both subscriber and e-commerce products.

Register today for “Harness Your First-Party Data For Customer Acquisition & Conversion,” presented by ActionIQ.

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How to optimize PPC reporting for ad creatives

Here’s how to develop a creative reporting strategy for PPC to wow your clients and enable your creative team to do their best work.

The post How to optimize PPC reporting for ad creatives appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Automation has stepped in to take over many of the levers we’ve had in digital advertising. Consequently, we need to shift our attention to optimizing the things we can still control.

Right now, one of the essential tools in our kit is the ability to create and fine-tune our ad creatives. 

Having the right creatives in the right places helps brands break through the clutter. It also empowers us to qualify audiences by assessing the proper messaging and combinations of creative elements to target audiences and drive results effectively.

However, simply designing and testing creative pieces is not enough. To squeeze the most value out of each piece, you must:

  • Effectively report on the performance of more granular creative elements.
  • Analyze what’s working to communicate results.
  • Continuously optimize ads for maximum efficiency. 

Here’s how to develop a creative reporting strategy for PPC to wow your clients and enable your creative team to do their best work.

1. Identify key creative elements to compare results

Aside from finding out the effectiveness of a single creative piece, stakeholders want to know why something is – or isn’t – working.

Finding these answers requires breaking down different elements of the creative piece and measuring each component’s efficacy. 

Some examples of creative elements you might want to consider measuring include:

  • Ad type: How are your static ads performing versus video, HTML or other ad formats?
  • Primary color: Is your audience more responsive to a specific background?
  • Messaging: Does the overarching message of the ad resonate with your audience?
  • Product: Are you offering a variety of products across your creative pieces?
  • Placement: Where is your creative being shown?

Generally, being able to identify and analyze five to six elements is the sweet spot. Anything more than that, you can run the risk of analysis paralysis and data overload. But, fewer than that won’t tell you much of a story or give you actionable insight. 

These elements are not necessarily static or required. For example, if you find that analyzing color doesn’t make much difference to overall performance, consider removing it from your analysis and looking at something else. 


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2. Analyze performance across elements

To take ad creatives to the next level, brands and marketers must prioritize the cross-analysis of creative elements against each other.

For example, you may find that one of your product offerings is underperforming against the others overall. However, it may be overperforming when combined with a specific product or color scheme. 

Digging deeper into this data and gaining these insights is extremely valuable to marketers. It will enable you to communicate what is working and allow the creative team to focus on providing new content that aligns best with what is driving results.

Before you launch your creative initiatives, ensure that you have clearly defined your measurement and performance goals beforehand. This will vary depending on your campaign strategy and platform. 

For example, top-of-funnel tactics may measure success by impressions and eyeballs. But, the magic happens when you get performance data from your client that shows which ads and, ultimately, which creatives best drive their lower-funnel metric performance. 

3. Develop a clear feedback process for the creative team

With any reporting, the goal of building out creative reporting is to be meaningful and actionable.

Whether the creative team is in-house for your client or you are working with a third-party agency, it is critical to convey your analysis to that team so they can focus on providing new content that aligns best with driving results. 

A feedback cycle might look like this:

  • Setting up a bi-weekly cadence to review performance.
  • Providing the creative team with direct access to your reporting.
  • Teaching them how to derive the information they need. 

The key to optimizing ad creatives reporting is conveying your intentions to your client and creative partners. You need to show the value of having buy-in for a properly defined feedback and communication process. When a creative reporting strategy is fine-tuned, the results will always speak for themselves.

4. Consider creative fatigue as a factor

One crucial aspect to consider when analyzing and communicating creative results is the ability to identify when creative fatigue is setting in.

What this looks like is up to marketers to quantify. But generally, if something that was performing starts to take a noticeable dip, this can indicate that it’s time to switch things up and provide fresh messaging.

By regularly monitoring your creative performance, you can quickly notice an otherwise unexplained drop in performance week over week and ensure you don’t continue spending valuable budget on stale creative. 

The takeaway

With the ever-shifting landscape of the digital advertising world, we need to continually find fresh ways to redefine our roles and demonstrate our utility as marketers. 

The ability to dive into the numbers, analyze creative performance and offer robust, concise reporting will ensure you continue to provide tangible value to clients and stay ahead of the competition. 

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