Why Marketers Struggle and What to Do About It

Having trouble viewing the text? You can always read the original article here: Why Marketers Struggle and What to Do About It
Marketing departments are understaffed, overworked and required to do quantitative and creative work. No wonder marketers are…

Having trouble viewing the text? You can always read the original article here: Why Marketers Struggle and What to Do About It

Marketing departments are understaffed, overworked and required to do quantitative and creative work. No wonder marketers are struggling. How does Erin Collis deal with the variety of tasks all marketers face? What can leaders do? F. Scott Fitzgerald is credited with saying “The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed […]

The post Why Marketers Struggle and What to Do About It appeared first on Conversion Sciences.

Google introduces App + Web for unified reporting in Google Analytics

The new capabilities let marketers look at customer data in more complete and flexible ways.

The post Google introduces App + Web for unified reporting in Google Analytics appeared first on Marketing Land.

The customer journey has become increasingly complex over time, with users often switching back and forth between desktop and mobile and various channels before buying. It is thus fairly challenging for marketers to gain an accurate and complete view of their customers’ paths to purchase.

Two great tastes. Google has historically had two separate tools for web and app analytics: Google Analytics and Google Analytics for Firebase, for mobile apps. Now the company is combining their capabilities in a new property that seeks to provide a more unified view of customer data: App + Web for Google Analytics.

Director of Product Management for Google Analytics, Jesse Savage, said that he hopes the new offering will help marketers and brands improve the customer experience by giving them “a single, consistent set of metrics for more integrated reporting and a more comprehensive view of the customer journey” (on Google properties). Starting today, App + Web will begin rolling out to all Google Analytics and Analytics 360 users for free.

Flexible reporting. Out of the box, it will offer a set of common events or actions that marketers can measure (e.g., clicks, video views, downloads, opens, etc.). But Savage said the tool is very flexible and can be customized according to the needs and specific requirements of the marketer.

Google points out the types of questions publishers and brands can now more easily answer with App + Web, including:

  • How many total users do we have regardless of the platform?
  • Where are the majority of conversions happening (web or app)?
  • Which marketing or advertising channel is most effect at driving new user acquisition?

Analysis module offers new ways to look at the data. A new Analysis module also enables users to look at customer data in various and flexible ways, outside of standardized reports. These include “Exploration,” which allows drag and drop data visualization, “Funnel” analysis to determine where customers are entering and leaving your properties and “Path Analysis,” which helps marketers better understand the steps along the customer journey and why users did or did not convert.

Google says that if customers are currently using Google Tag Manager or the global site tag, you don’t have to do any re-tagging to take advantage of App + Web analytics. But you’ll need to implement the Firebase SDK for your app if that’s not already the case.

Why we should care. It’s critical for brands and marketers to gain as complete an understanding of their customers’ behavior as possible. Of course, Google isn’t the only platform consumers use in making buying decisions. For marketers entirely focused on their apps, or for those who don’t have an app, the new capabilities won’t be particularly meaningful. But for those focused on both mobile apps and the web, the new App + Web capability offers much greater visibility and insight than Google Analytics and Google Analytics for Firebase each could on their own.

The post Google introduces App + Web for unified reporting in Google Analytics appeared first on Marketing Land.

How marketers can take the lead with revenue optimization teams

Many marketers are best positioned to drive change, improve alignment and create new opportunities for business results.

The post How marketers can take the lead with revenue optimization teams appeared first on Marketing Land.

Most marketers are equipped with copious amounts of data that help us understand our customers, create meaningful messaging that resonates with our audience and drives the business outcomes we need to achieve our goals. Marketers also have the ability to translate different trends across customers and prospects such as strong lead generation sources, common themes, objection trends and overall responses to different campaigns. But, many organizations operate in siloes, making it difficult to share these data points with the necessary people.

A solution? Establish a revenue optimization team to bring together the key internal players in your organization to improve alignment and ultimately, drive more revenue. 

Marketers and sales need to track the same goals

Thanks to the amount of valuable information accessible through our martech stacks, marketers can — and should — play a critical role in establishing a customer-centric revenue optimization team.

“Revenue optimization starts with the idea of putting the customer in the center of every interaction an enabling everyone to align around the customer to generate value in every interaction,” said Patrick Morrissey, chief marketing officer of customer revenue optimization platform, Altify. And according to Morrissey, marketers should play a critical role as part of the revenue team, and are best positioned to lead the charge. For many marketers, this requires a shift in thinking about our revenue contributions.

“From a marketing perspective, thinking about the fundamental outcomes, marketers have to start thinking of themselves as part of the revenue team,” said Morrissey. “This intersection presents an opportunity for marketers who are generally better communicators to become the translation mechanism for an entire team. Instead of tracking pipeline, marketers need to track revenue in closed/won business along with the sales team.”

The shift in mindset expands past the marketing team, however. According to Jenn DiMaria, senior manager of client services at marketing automation solution provider Digital Pi, the shift in mindset needs to be organizational. “Marketing is often viewed as a cost center, but in reality, other teams are lusting after the tools and data we have access to,” said DiMaria. “Aligning a revenue team creates opportunities for marketers to improve accessibility  to the data and help bridge gaps with other parts of the organization.” 

Marketers, get closer to the customer

Marketers tend to be far removed from any interactions with customers, but it is extremely valuable to engage face-to-face with customers. After all, marketers understand that relationship-building is key to retaining customers.  According to Morrissey, marketers need to put themselves in the shoes of the customer in order to understand their challenges.

“Marketers should focus on how we can get out of our own way and put ourselves in the shoes of the customers,” said Morrissey. “Going on the road to meet with salespeople and sit with customers will help marketers better understand the market, the broader changes in technology and fundamentally how to help customers succeed, personally and professionally.”

“Marketers need to have some real-world customer experience, explained Mary Ngai, founder of Connector42 and head of analytics and technology at RI. “Even if marketers are listening on sales calls, it can be incredibly insightful in grasping a better understanding of their needs.” Ngai also recommends that marketers attend customer site visits during ongoing projects or sales deals to increase visibility into accounts.

In addition to more face time with customers, Morrissey recommends that marketers lead internal account reviews and deal reviews with the sales and customer success teams. Regularly reviewing the accounts with members of different parts of the organization will expose different issues and areas that can be addressed by the necessary members of the revenue optimization team. Working with customer success can also bring to light what some of the daily challenges and successes the customer experiences — valuable insight for marketers as they developing retention campaigns to drive renewals. 

Leading the path to revenue optimization

Revenue optimization teams present an opportunity for marketers to leverage their communication, analytical and creative skills to improve holistic marketing efforts in coordination with other internal departments. 

“Marketers have proven that we can lead revenue optimization teams as we typically bear the brunt of the responsibility when it comes to acquiring new leads and we have to track our efforts,” said DiMaria. “Also, tools that have entered the market in the past ten years have made this possible.”

The concept of implementing a fundamental shift in thinking may seem overwhelming, but the long-term benefit is streamlined efforts across your organization and consistent communication around prospect and customer activities.

“If you think about the customer journey, we’re all trying to get a numeric view of the customer — BDRs are measured by the total number of call they make and are concerned with propensity-to-buy data,” said Morrissey. “Marketers are providing that data, creating segments and determining what funnel to put a prospect in. Then we talk about deal size or ACV, then finally we’re just an NPS score. Marketers are the ones who can best translate this into plain English, for everyone to understand.”

The post How marketers can take the lead with revenue optimization teams appeared first on Marketing Land.

Introducing the New Monetate

I can’t think of a better way to announce my new full-time role as CMO of Monetate than with the unveiling of our all-new branding and website. But before I tell the story of our new visual identity, there are two things you should know about me right away: I consider myself a builder and…

The post Introducing the New Monetate appeared first on Monetate.

I can’t think of a better way to announce my new full-time role as CMO of Monetate than with the unveiling of our all-new branding and website. But before I tell the story of our new visual identity, there are two things you should know about me right away: I consider myself a builder and I value candor in leadership above most other qualities.

In the spirit of both building and candor, when I joined Monetate as a consultant a few months ago, I realized immediately that our brand identity was no longer reflective of our forward-looking team, product, and roadmap — not to mention cutting-edge B2C brand customers.

It was a huge contrast to the impressive technology platform the team at Monetate has built and the truly exceptional work our services team is doing with the world’s leading retailers. This disconnect between our brand presence and our technical execution activated what I call my “builder gene” right away; it’s one of the reasons I leapt (in heels) toward this opportunity with Monetate.

Although we’re in our 11th year as a company, our startup roots and deep well of in-house talent are driving innovation after innovation: in just one example, we’re creating the world’s very first personalization exchange to programmatically power true 1:1 personalization and solve the cold start problem for brands.

Introducing the New Look for Monetate

That’s why I’m excited to introduce our new logo, palette, and brand identity here. Not (just) because Monetate is going to be more visually appealing. Because every step of this rebranding was inspired by my colleagues, our customers, and a clear vision for the future of personalization.

Our new logo is modern and approachable. The colors and our supporting palette are not only friendly, they were selected to be reflective of our target demographic and their customers in the B2C space. It was particularly important to me that our brand feel inclusive, rather than a traditionally masculine technology company. We pushed our designers to be unafraid to use colors that have stereotypically been avoided in the technology space.

See?

You’re Invited to Participate in the New Monetate

My ask is that you share feedback on our new branding and website with me. We’re really serious about our mission to help retailers thrive in an era of change and instability. And we’re equally serious about building the technology that delivers exceptional personalized experiences for shoppers. Our brand is ever-evolving because, just like our customers, our marketing team must continually test and optimize and learn.

I can’t wait to hear from you, and I’m so excited to be one part of the new Monetate brand story.

The post Introducing the New Monetate appeared first on Monetate.

4 Leading Techniques to Design Personalized Apps

Given the level of competition in the iOS and Android app stores, creating a unique and personalized experience for each individual user is becoming a meaningful differentiator for app creators. Personalization when implemented well, can help businesses achieve better user engagement, increase retention, and allow app owners to build a more individual relationship with their […]

The post 4 Leading Techniques to Design Personalized Apps appeared first on Blog.

Given the level of competition in the iOS and Android app stores, creating a unique and personalized experience for each individual user is becoming a meaningful differentiator for app creators. Personalization when implemented well, can help businesses achieve better user engagement, increase retention, and allow app owners to build a more individual relationship with their customers.

This guide is an introduction to design personalized apps. We introduce when, where, and how personalization can be used to create a better user experience for your customers. We touch upon audience segmentation, geolocation, and other features that your app can use to increase engagement. By combining these techniques with the latest and best app design techniques, you can ensure the survival of your app in the personalized era.

Before That: Should You Choose To Personalize?

Building a personalized experience for your users has numerous benefits for you as an app owner. However, before solving their problems, you should always start by interviewing your customers, creating personas, and coming to a well-honed  understanding the goals and frustrations of users. Customization can be costly and time consuming, and should never be an approach you always default to. That said, personalization helps you to match customer needs that would otherwise be impossible without sacrificing usability, learnability, and the emotional need that your users will have for your app. Personalization also pushes you to review what is important about your app for your users – and what is not.

How Do I Personalize My Mobile App Experience?

The differences between personalized and non-personalized designs lie primarily in the organization of your user interface and the customer contact touch points. A non-personalized UX/UI design delivers the same experience for all users, regardless of any data that the app may have about user preferences and activities.

Personalized experiences delve deeper into a user’s mind. Screens are unique, customized, and tailored to each user’s individual needs and preferences. Designs often offer different sets of features, depending on the user’s activity, history, location, and previous activity in the app. Other customizations can also include personalized ads, offers, and push notifications.

Anticipatory Design

Anticipatory design is an approach to design whereby you look to solve a user’s needs before they even realize they have them themselves. A successful anticipatory design makes a user feel more at home within your app, like it is “just right” for them by giving them what they want and when they want it in a clear and intuitive way. Clearly, users are more prone to stay with your app when their needs are met with little or no friction.

In the below examples, Google sends appropriate notifications depending on your location and time of day, giving you valuable information about weather, traffic, and events even before you think of needing it.

Segmenting Your App Users

Customization is simply guesswork if you can’t intelligently segment your audience by using real user data. A user’s history, the date and time, level of engagement, location, friends, followers, and a host of other data can be used to build a profile of each user from which you can segment and implement unique functionality and UI design flows.

The main aim of user segmentation is to group various categories of users you might have. For example, younger users visiting a new city might want to learn about the latest drinking spots and trendy nightclubs. Meanwhile, older adults might prefer updated information about a nice, quiet restaurant with a price-conscious midweek menu. Obviously, the segmentation and solutions you come up with will be unique to your own app and give direction to your personalization efforts.

Segmentation should also define what success means within the context of your app. You must be able to measure whether users take the actions you expected them to or not. Examples include clicking ads, buying products, and other activities. With the right data and the right model of what you expect your users to do, you can check what kinds of engagements work for each segment.

When implemented, your tracking data and analytics will allow you to see which personalization options like geolocation, notifications, or social proof give your app a more individually satisfying experience to each customer.

1 Geolocation and Targeting

Geolocation – that is, being able to tell where a user is and provide content that is location-specific – is a common approach to meeting your user’s needs. This customization is especially relevant to users who wish to access local services, for example, apps for shopping for groceries, eating out, or discovering live music events. Products that use it include taxi services like Uber and meal delivery services like Deliveroo.

Combining Geolocation with other user data – for example, a search history for Chinese restaurants – allows you to handpick important events you know each user will find relevant and interesting – like sending out a notification with a rating for a restaurant if the user is at a time they normally eat, and they are passing by a particular restaurant.

2 User Progress Milestones

Creating milestones for users to achieve creates a sense of achievement, while providing rewards can push users to increase their engagement. As a result, app users will end up taking actions that benefit you as an owner, for example, purchasing products or booking a ticket for an event you are promoting. Good examples include airline frequent flyer miles, shopping rewards cards and unlocking content, based on user progress on your app.

Progress milestones also improve usability by allowing you to keep things simple for beginners while unlocking advanced content later for hardcore users. Many games and gamification techniques fall into this category of customization.

3 Customized Content

Animations, videos, images, and content can all be uniquely chosen for your users, based on information about them. Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter all leverage this approach, by using your history of likes and shares to curate a feed that is more interesting to you personally. Try clicking “Like” a few times on a certain person’s posts and that person is guaranteed to appear at the top of your feed the next time you sign in. The core rule here for personalization is: If the user likes doing something in your app, give them more opportunities to take similar actions the next time they sign in. Taking an action like “like,” “share,” or “upvote” is a clear signal that they value your app for that purpose.

4 Communicating what your friends have done

“Your friend Dave also likes this company or product” and “Your friend Dave visited here 3 months ago” – how often do you see notifications like this on sites like Facebook, Yelp, or TripAdvisor? By connecting your experience with other people you know and trust, apps can create a level of trust based on the recommendations of other people you know.

Conclusion

We are living in the era of personalized apps. Attention spans are short, and competition is everywhere. Finding the right combination of personalizations and optimizing it through repeated analysis of your data and a deep understanding of potential personalisation will help you create solutions that are best in class.

The post 4 Leading Techniques to Design Personalized Apps appeared first on Blog.

[eCommerce Customer Segmentation] Bracketed Segmentation: Peeling Away The Layers

An eCommerce marketing leader’s outlook toward analyzing visitor behavior is akin to a chef working with an abundance of onions (a cohort of customers – “women shoppers”), and each onion an amalgamation of infinite layers (individual unique traits – “from Minnesota” & “using an iPhone”) comprising them. Whether the chef ends up leading operations at […]

The post [eCommerce Customer Segmentation] Bracketed Segmentation: Peeling Away The Layers appeared first on Blog.

An eCommerce marketing leader’s outlook toward analyzing visitor behavior is akin to a chef working with an abundance of onions (a cohort of customers – “women shoppers”), and each onion an amalgamation of infinite layers (individual unique traits – “from Minnesota” & “using an iPhone”) comprising them.

eCommerce Segments are like onions - layer resting upon layer.
eCommerce segments are like onions – layer resting upon layer

Whether the chef ends up leading operations at a corner tuck-shop or makes her way into a Michelin-rated restaurant is a function of how she goes about unpeeling the various layers. Successful marketers realize that competitive advantage rests in identifying high-value micro-segments for keeping in step to unearth fascinating insights from their journey.

What is a micro-segment, you might ask?

A micro-segment is nothing but a composite of multiple sub-segments that come together to form bigger segment. Such segments are typically more granular and allow marketers to look at buyer behavior from multiple lenses. A good example of a micro-segment would be

“Visitors from organic search (Segment 1) who landed on our shoes page (Segment 2), clicked on an offer banner (Segment 3) and purchased (Segment 4) through an iPhone (Segment 5)”

Through “Bracketed Segments,” VWO is empowering e-commerce leaders to observe micro-segments at the click of a button that has already introduced unparalleled powers in a marketer’s arsenal across user research, tracking & analysis finally culminating in testing. By means of 3 examples, this article intends to showcase the many ways in which marketing teams are exploiting Bracketed Segmentation through VWO.

So, without further ado, let’s dive in!

***

Understanding behavior of “iPhone users” who “purchased” from a “country/city

That iOS users boast of a greater purchasing power is an obvious assertion – what is not obvious though is visualizing their behavior from additional behavioral & demo-graphical standpoints.

By deploying bracketed segments in VWO, eCommerce marketing teams can filter users with buying intent (users who visited “cart” or “checkout” pages). Most don’t stop there – city-level drill down is an additional lever of interest.

ecommerce customer segments
Breaking down a micro-segment into it’s individual components

The following is a representation of how users can analyze session recordings of “iPhone users” who”purchased” and are “from California.” Think of this problem statement as a composite segment that combines three individual segments

Segment 1: “iPhone Users

iPhone users inside VWO
An in-app view of filtering Segment 1 “iPhone Users”

Segment 2: “Purchased

View of visitors who purchased
Segment 2: View of all visitors who “purchased”

Segment 3: “From California

View of visitors who purchased from California
Segment 3: From California
All session recordings of
of “iPhone users” who”purchased” and are “from California.”

***

Comparing Heatmaps of “VIP Shoppers” vs. “Regular Visitors” from “United Kingdom”

Another area of interest for e-cCommerce marketing teams is comparing heatmaps of two or more segments together, for example, “VIP Shoppers” versus “Regular Visitors” – after all, stand-alone clickmaps are irrelevant unless used for comparisons. Such comparisons helps you to answer questions like

  • Which areas of the website’s real estate are more interesting for VIP Shoppers?
  • What are some specific buttons/links that appeal more to VIP Shoppers?
Example of yet another micro-segment

Using VWO’s Custom Dimensions, marketers can tag a visitor as VIP (or Regular). The platform can be used to classify a dimension in one of the two scopes—session and visitor—which allows for the desired breadth marketing that teams seek.

Tagging a visitor as a VIP or as a Regular entails a “Visitor”-level classification, which can be triggered from the platform as shown below:

Custom Dimensions
VWO Custom Dimensions reward you with unlimited possibilities around segmentation

After creating a user-level scope and calling the dimension as “VIP Buyers,” the next step for the users is to configure the following code snippet on the ecommerce store’s pages

<script>
window.VWO = window.VWO || [];
// Replace TAG_VALUE with your actual tag value
window.VWO.push(['tag', 'user_type_by_value', 'VIP_Buyers, 'user']);
</script>

In the above code snippet, “user_type_by_value” is representative of the type of visitor that users would want to segment upon. “VIP_Buyer” stands for the microsegment within.

And voila! VWO will now start classifying visitors as VIP or Regular.

To access clickmaps of the 2 segments:

  • Click on “Select one or more segments” when you click upon heatmaps
eCommerce Segments inside VWO
The VWO Segment Gallery lets you load and analyze multiple segments
  • Search for Custom Dimensions – a drop-down option reveals the option. Custom Dimensions has 2 properties associated with them
    • Tag
    • Value
Custom Dimension Inside VWO
Remember creating a Custom Dimension earlier? Here is how it looks like inside the platform

Reiterating from above, Tag stands for the broad filter “user_type_by_value” and Value stands for the microsegment, in our case “VIP Buyer.” Just type “VIP Buyer” in the value field to be access all clickmaps for this segment.

To access a view of buyers from the UK, search for “Location” from Custom Dimensions, and then select “United Kingdom” as the country of choice.

Ecommerce customer segments
Bracketing “VIP Users” from “Britain” to form a larger micro-segment

To check out clickmaps for non-VIP buyers just replace tag value with “Regular Buyer” and repeat the process.

“Regular Users” from “Britain”

Most marketers proceed to analyze the two heatmaps by looking at them side-by-side. Here is how heatmaps looked like, for the two segments, for a VWO customer – Clearly, what’s hot for one segment is not for another!

Marketing teams compare heatmaps of various segments to analyze hot areas for the them

***

Breaking down “female users” who “clicked an offer banner” and “purchased” – aka Bargain Hunters

You can’t possibly document an e-cCommerce pooled-segmentation story without introducing the “offers” tangent. A 24/7/365 deals or flash sales environment across the entire spectrum of eCommerce has led to marketers carving a specialty segment—bargain hunters.

Bracketed segmentation allows marketers to split the broad bargain hunter into multiple micro-segments. Some prominent micro-segments are

  • Bargain hunters from a city/country
  • Bargain hunters by sex (male/female)
  • Bargain hunters by source (direct/organic/search)

In this example, let’s dive into the following problem statement

How do I analyze the behavior of “female shoppers” (segment 1) who “clicked an offer” (segment 2) and concluded the session with a “purchase” (segment 3)?

Let us now break down the above statement into its individual components:

Slicing visitors who clicked an offer

A pertinent question that our clients often ask us is, “How do I identify my bargain hunters?

Most offers are preceded by a sitewide banner advertisement that leads visitors to the offers page. For a typical e-tailer, Bargain Hunters would be all visitors who click the advertisement to proceed to the offer page. To collect data of all such sessions, all you need to do is to configure a simple <onclick> function that gets relayed to VWO through the following code snippet

$('.offerbannerad').on('click', function() {
     window.VWO = window.VWO || [];
     window.VWO.push(['tag', 'Offerbannneradclicks', _vis_opt_readCookie(‘endofseasonsalebanner'), 'session']);
 });

In the above snippet:

‘offerbannerad’ = Function that assembles all sessions in which banner ads were clicked

‘session’ = As “clicks on banner ad” falls under a session-wide scope

VWO users can filter all sessions with clicks on the offer banner by following the steps outlined below.

Note: The following steps denote analyzing session recordings. Users also have the ability to analyze clickmaps, heatmaps, surveys, form behavior, and A/B test reports for the same segment.

  • Click Recordings in the left panel of the platform.
  • Then click the All Visitors tab – it displays a larger window with Custom Segments. Clicking Custom reveals a drop-down – search for “Custom Dimensions” in the drop-down options.
  • In the Tag field, search for Offerbannerad. Type the first few characters, and then click the correct string from the displayed options. Click the string to secure your tag.

    Value of the tag would be “endofseasonsalebanner.”
Segment to carve out Bargain Hunters
  • Click Apply to reveal all sessions in which the banner was clicked.
All sessions with clicks on their banner ad

Slicing “female users”

Remember the ‘VIP Shopper’ example from above? Like how ‘VIP vs Regular’ is a trait defined by the user’s purchase quantum (a function of loyalty), ‘male vs female’ is also a user trait that differentiates the two; therefore, the scope defined for this segment should be the user.

The code snippet to introduce a ’female’’’ slice as a segment is like the one we used to identify a VIP shopper – the only difference is the “tag” nomenclature.

<script>
window.VWO = window.VWO || [];
// Replace TAG_VALUE with your actual tag value
window.VWO.push(['tag', 'user_type_by_sex', ‘females’, 'user']);
</script>

user_type_by_sex = Broad filter that classifies users per their sex

females = All female users

(Note: Classification by sex might be driven by data flowing from eCommerce CRMs.)

To access all sessions of female users, just search for “females” tag through the custom dimension “user type by sex.”

ecommerce segments by sex
VWO lets you segment user type by sex.

Slicing Purchase Sessions

A comparatively easier segment to slice, to access all sessions that concluded with a purchase look for ‘Landing Page.” Assuming your e-store has a “Thank You” page signaling a purchase, all you need to do is

  • Search for the segment “Landing Page URL” in Custom Dimensions
  • In the drop-down below, select contains
  • Type “thank-you” in the box next to “contains” and click apply
VWO lets you segment all sessions that concluded with a purchase

To exploit the power of bracketed segmentation, just add the 3 segments together and the user will have access to detailed session recordings of “women” who “clicked the offer” and “purchased.”

Session Recordings in VWO
Session Recordings of all women who clicked an offer and bought

***

Bracketed segmentation is a powerful tool in an eCommerce marketer’s arsenal. Your powers are only limited to your imagination—to further it, following are some lucrative segments for your business that you can start analyzing today.

  • ‘Used a specific payment method’ AND ‘are from a particular city’
  • ‘Males’ who ‘browsed a particular category page’ AND ‘added to cart’ BUT ‘did not purchase’
  • ‘Females’ FROM ‘a particular country’ WITH ‘an LTV greater than the average’

What are some of your preferred segments? Let’s start a chat in the comments?

The post [eCommerce Customer Segmentation] Bracketed Segmentation: Peeling Away The Layers appeared first on Blog.

The Definitive Guide to eCommerce Surveys (20+ Real Templates)

Most marketers largely depend on website analytics, heat maps, click maps, form analysis, and visitor recordings to identify areas of friction and leakage within the conversion funnel. Admittedly, these tools are great to get valuable information and quantitative data to build hypotheses — however, they only tell part of the story. The best way to […]

The post The Definitive Guide to eCommerce Surveys (20+ Real Templates) appeared first on Blog.

Most marketers largely depend on website analytics, heat maps, click maps, form analysis, and visitor recordings to identify areas of friction and leakage within the conversion funnel.

Admittedly, these tools are great to get valuable information and quantitative data to build hypotheses — however, they only tell part of the story.

The best way to truly understand your customers and finding out what they want is by asking them and hearing it straight from them – firsthand.  

According to Hubspot, Voice of the Customer (VoC) is a powerful methodology to get into the customer’s mind. You can capture what your customers feel about your website and understand the gap between customer expectations and their purchasing experience using website surveys.

In this guide, you’ll learn more about the different types of eCommerce surveys you can run on your website, real examples from some of our customers, and how to create a survey using VWO. Let’s get started.

What’s in store for you?

  1. Why should every eCommerce business run on-page surveys?
  2. Where on your website should you ask survey questions?
  3. The top 6 types of surveys you should be running right now + examples from real customers
  4. Setting up an on-page survey using VWO
  5. Conclusion

Why should you run on-page surveys?

On-page surveys help you understand your customers’ common characteristics, build customer personas, understand their terminology – the exact words and phrases your customers use.

They also uncover insights about what your customers are looking for, how do they prefer to buy, conversion blockers, their emotional psyche, their opinion about your competitors and lots more.

What more? They also serve as a repository of ideas!

Think about it. Hundreds of visitors come to your store, every single day. If you get 50 unique responses from a survey, these responses turn into 50 different test ideas for your website. Out of those 50,  even if 10% win, you get 5 solid winners that actively contribute toward scaling your business revenue. It’s a win-win situation!

Now, building an excellent survey for your website largely depends on two things:

  • The probes you present in front of your website visitors
  • Which page(s) do you prompt your survey

This brings us to our next question – where should you run your survey?

Where on your site should you run surveys?

On-page surveys are exceptional for in-the-moment feedback. Experts suggest that you must run surveys on pages that have a high bounce rate or under-perform in your conversion funnel.

Identify pages that have a high exit rate or are crucial to your business. Curate a list of questions that you need to ask to determine why your visitors are dropping off on these pages.

However, don’t limit your surveys to your conversion leaks. You can also ask questions on your post-purchase thank you page to learn from successful conversions. You can use all these insights to build a solid hypothesis for a/b testing ideas on your website.

The Top 6 types of surveys you should be running right now!

(Ready-to-use examples from real customers)

  1. Break the ice

You have access to information such as your customers’ IP address, device type, browser, and location. However, other vital details such as your customer’s age, gender, profession, what are they looking for on your website, purchase frequency, their opinion on your competitors are slightly challenging to collect.

With on-page surveys, you can ask relevant questions to your customers while they’re on your website without being intrusive or disturbing their shopping experience.

Here’s how a leading UK based online store selling hair and beauty salon supplies learns more about their customers every day.

ecommerce surveys
surveys for eCommerce websites
survey responses for ecommerce websites
on-page survey responses

These survey questions not only help the brand in understanding the customers better but also make it easier to provide a personalized shopping experience and improve conversions.

Pro tip: Don’t hesitate to ask for seemingly personal or controversial questions. However, ensure that the timing is right.

For example, popping your survey immediately after a user has landed on your website may seem overwhelming. Wait for the user to spend more than 15-20 seconds on a page, and then begin your survey. You can also keep certain questions optional to avoid customer hesitation.

Always remember, hindering your customers’ shopping experience to know more about them may back-fire. Keep it simple and contextual.

2. Uncover customer psyche

Honestly, the importance of this cannot be stressed enough. Nobody knows what your customers want more than your customers themselves. So the best thing one can do is, ask.

Get inside your customer’s mind, wear their shoes and get to know them better by asking the right questions.

Here’s how Germany’s largest lingerie manufacturers run surveys to provide tailor-made shopping experiences.

online ecommerce store answers
online ecommerce store answers

This helps the brand understand customer needs and expectations. They also discover growth opportunities to provide a personalized shopping experience to their customers.

Pro Tip: Be bold and creative. Want to launch a new product collection? Have a unique loyalty program that you wish to run? Get quick feedback from a small group of customers before going all out with guns blazing.

3) Get website feedback straight from the horse’s mouth

Getting experts to review your website is brilliant. However, what’s better is getting your customers to tell you what they feel about your website. Discover process bottlenecks and conversion roadblocks by gently prompting your customers to share their experiences.

A fast-growing online retailer selling quality and low priced home and fitness products runs this survey to find out what their customers feel about their website.

multiple choice survey responses
ecommerce store survey questions
on-page survey responses
survey responses of ecommerce stores.

They also identify improvement areas by asking their customers for feedback on the new additions on their website. For instance, they recently launched product videos and wanted to understand if their customers were getting value out of them. Here’s the survey they ran.

survey responses on product videos
ecommerce survey response for videos

Pro tip: You can also improve your checkout process with customer feedback. Prompt a survey like the one below.

4) Leaving Already? Triggering Exit Intent Surveys

The current average bounce rate for eCommerce websites stands at a staggering 45.65%.

Using Google Analytics, heat maps and click maps gives you an overview of how your visitors are interacting with your website, such as pages they’re spending time on, products and elements that they’re clicking on, pages with the highest drop-offs, and so on.

However, understanding the ‘why’ behind their exit – getting qualitative data, the real reason from your visitors, in their own words, isn’t possible without exit surveys.

Triggering an exit survey, right when a visitor is about to leave your website is a great way to get insights from your bouncing or non-converting audience; without having to rely on guesswork.

Here’s how the biggest pizza chain in the world runs exit surveys.

These insights are a gold mine for marketers!

If done right, the exit survey can be a great feedback tool to reduce bounce rate and improve conversions. Plus, you can run surveys for different audience segments such as web users, mobile users, mobile web users, country-specific, device specific, and lots more.

5) Decoding User Habits and Behavior

Personalization is key to a great online experience. Moreover, nothing beats knowing your customers’ habits,  preferences, and behavior up close.

Get personal with your customers; make them feel special while concurrently obtaining the feedback that you require.

Here’s how the globally renowned lingerie manufacturer from Germany decodes user habits and behavior on their website.

survey responses for lingerie ecommerce store
online shopping common reasons for lingerie
online shopping common reasons for lingerie

Getting insights about your users’ habits and online shopping behavior can be a pathway to endless possibilities! You can drive personalization and drastically improve conversions by running such surveys.

Pro Tip: Here are a few more personal questions that you can ask your customers to know them better:

  • Which payment methods do you prefer?
  • How much would you be willing to spend on (insert your brand category/products)
  • Would trust badges/reviews influence your purchase decision?
  • Do you prefer shopping on weekdays or weekends?

6) Measuring Customer Happiness with Surveys

Did you know, bad customer experiences are twice as likely to be shared as compared to great customer experiences — thereby making it imperative to identify customer issues and resolve them before they go viral on Reddit, Facebook, Twitter or Yelp.

What your customers think about your brand is essential for the sustainability of your business and is vital throughout the customer lifecycle.

Using feedback surveys can help you identify your brand’s Net Promoter Score i.e. your happiest customers who have the potential to become brand advocates and simultaneously boost customer retention.

Here’s an excellent example of how the marketing team of this online retailer selling home and fitness products collects feedback from their customers.

examples of responses from a survey on ecommerce store
survey responses on customer interaction
ecommerce website survey responses VWO

Customer surveys are an excellent resource to get tangible data to make swing-for-the-fences decisions. And the best part is that your decisions aren’t based on assumptions or hunches but rather based on real insights about how your customers feel about your eCommerce store.

Here’s a 2-minute walk through of how you can create a website survey using VWO.

Creating an on-page survey with VWO

Step 1: Go to Surveys on the dashboard and click on ‘New Campaign’.

create website surveys in VWO

Step 2: Enter the URLs of the pages and define visitor segments.

visitor segmentation in website surveys in VWO

Step 3: Define user actions that will trigger the on-page survey

visitor intent customisation of surveys in VWO

Step 4: Add questions to the survey and choose the type of answers you wish to receive (single-line, drop-down, radio, and so on)

creating website survey questions in VWO

Step 5: Configure the theme for the pop-up survey, use custom branding, define the placement of the survey on the visitor’s screen, etc.

white-label website surveys in VWO

Step 6: Finalizing the survey – name the survey, specify the traffic percentage, and define other additional settings and you’re good to go!

survey campaigns in VWO

Read the detailed process of creating a survey in this article here.

You can also set up a free website survey using VWO. Request a demo.

Key takeaways

In a nutshell, on-page surveys are incredibly crucial to optimize your conversion funnel. They help you spot roadblocks in the buyer’s journey and remove friction from the checkout process, thereby increasing conversions and growing your business.

Here’s a quick recap of things to remember while running an on-page survey:

  • Have a clear goal in mind
  • Ask the right questions and at the right time.
  • Ensure that your surveys fit into the bigger picture of your conversion optimization efforts
  • Surveys are iterative, and every poll – whether it’s a success or not – is a learning experience.
  • Use learnings from every survey to synthesize significant observations and develop more informed experiment ideas.

BONUS 🎉

8 Hacks to write excellent survey questions that encourage responses

  1. Keep it simple: Avoid jargon like the plague. Keep your questions to the point and make it simple for your users to understand them. Skip using acronyms — your respondents may not even know what they mean.
  2. Keep it concise: Short surveys (up to 3-4 questions) generally achieve a higher response rate as compared to long surveys. Ensure that all the questions in your survey are focused on meeting your end objective. Avoid adding nice-to-have questions to your survey that doesn’t help you get the direct data that you need.
  3. Incentivize your survey: Study suggests that offering monetary incentives increases the response rate by 19.1% and non-monetary rewards boost response rate by 7.9%. Throw in an occasional discount voucher/cashback/loyalty points to encourage respondents to complete the survey. Giving incentives can work exceptionally well if your survey is long or the responses are incredibly crucial or may have a substantial impact on your business.
  4. Avoid asking for too many answers in one question: “Are you happy with our loyalty program and also our new free shipping policy?” Loyalty program and free shipping policy are two separate topics altogether. Asking a double-barrelled question like this may confuse your respondents. They may end up answering only one of the two questions, which can further distill the accuracy of your survey responses. Your best bet is to ask both these questions separately.
  5. Don’t ask leading questions: “We love our new loyalty program, do you think it’s awesome?” This question seems to convey an opinion that you want your respondents to agree with. Such questions can wrongly influence your respondents into sharing answers that don’t reflect how they feel. Be careful of your tone and frame your questions to be neutral.
  6. Allow customers to skip questions: Not every respondent that takes the survey may know or be comfortable answering all the questions. Giving them the opportunity to skip questions can encourage them to complete the survey.
  7. Do a balanced mix of open-ended and closed-ended questions: Open-ended questions can be a great way to get your customers to tell you how they feel, in their own words. However, these questions require more effort and time to answer. Limit open-ended questions to two-three per survey. Try placing them at the end of the survey so that even if the respondents drop off, you’ll still have data for the rest of the survey.  
  8. Test test test: Nothing hurts more than finding out mistakes in a survey that’s already live. Give your survey a quick test run with your colleagues before hitting ‘go.’

The post The Definitive Guide to eCommerce Surveys (20+ Real Templates) appeared first on Blog.

SiriusDecisions Summit 2018: Bound Event Guide

One of the best events for B2B Leaders is right around the corner…are you ready for SiriusDecisions Summit 2018? It’s a big event, with 3,000+ attendees, 120+ vendors and all the frameworks and case studies you can dream of. I’ve waded my way through the “Sirius” puns, poured over session summaries, sifted through the Sirius […]

The post SiriusDecisions Summit 2018: Bound Event Guide appeared first on Bound.

One of the best events for B2B Leaders is right around the corner…are you ready for SiriusDecisions Summit 2018?

It’s a big event, with 3,000+ attendees, 120+ vendors and all the frameworks and case studies you can dream of. I’ve waded my way through the “Sirius” puns, poured over session summaries, sifted through the Sirius blog, and scouted every open-invite afterparty. Here is everything you need to know about SiriusDecisions Summit 2018.

Our team is excited to share this experience with you. Come say hello at booth 412!

Guest Keynotes

Last year I walked into Summit thinking how the heck does Jewel relate to B2B Marketing? As it turns out, Sirius event planners know what they are doing. I scribbled countless notes about lead nurture vs. nature and authenticity in marketing: “underneath, we’re all looking for the same thing: an authentic human experience.” You know that got my personalization juices flowing.

Jewel keynote on creating an authentic human experience

This year’s keynotes are Molly Bloom and Platon. If these speakers are good enough for an Aaron Sorkin feature film and the World Economic Forum in Davos, respectively, then we must be in for a treat. I expect we’ll witness masterful storytelling on the topics of authenticity, leadership, collaboration and ambition.

Analyst Keynotes

SiriusDecisions is known for dropping big ideas in the analyst keynotes. The 2017 big reveal was the Demand Unit Waterfall®, which shaped the conversation for the whole conference. While I don’t expect such a core announcement in 2018, we can expect the keynotes to guide the themes of the conference.

SiriusDecisions Summit Keynote Preview

Visit the Summit website for keynote overviews. The links below are to Sirius blog posts that give a little more insights into the keynote topics.

If you see these analysts out in the wild, go ahead and buy them a coffee or drink. They work really hard on these presentations. I also recommend following these keynote analysts who are active on Twitter throughout the conference: @julieogilvie, @KerrySirius, @gcanare, @Marisa_Kopec.

Sessions

The full 2018 Summit agenda features three praiseworthy changes.

  1. The 2018 Summit is condensed to three days, a half day less than previous years. This is a good move because that last half day was rough for travel arrangements (and fell after the Green Tie Gala) so attendance was low. Somehow, they still managed to squeeze in about the same amount of session time with the condensed schedule in 2018.
  2. There are 12 tracks to choose from in 2018, up from seven in 2017. The new track structure dedicates more focus within sales, product, brand, and customer engagement functions. SiriusDecisions has long advocated for alignment between the different facets of the revenue organization, so this update is feels like they are finally walkin’ the walk.
  3. Did somebody say role-based breakfast?! I’m so excited for the introduction of role-based breakfasts in 2018. Sessions, as educational as they are, are a one-way communication. Summit isn’t short on networking opportunities, but role-based networking time is valuable for getting inspiration and validation.

Personalization Strategy: A Custom Track

We recommend the following sessions to create your own personalization strategy track. Stop by our booth 412 to learn how Bound insights and personalization helps your demand, ABM, portfolio and content strategies.

Wednesday

  • ABM Infrastructure: A Capabilities-Driven View of the Stack That Drives Growth
  • Creating Demand Maps to Power Account-Centric Planning

Thursday

  • Activating Persona and Buyer Insights for Demand Creation or SiriusLab: Implementing Nurture Programs in a Demand Unit World
  • The State of B-to-B Content: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly
  • B-to-B Demand Creation: By the Numbers

Parties

What would SiriusDecisions be without parties? It is held in Las Vegas after all.

Quick overview of the SiriusDecisions-hosted parties: Fall Out Boy is headlining the Green Tie Gala. The Titanium Celebration is now earlier and in the marketplace, packing in all the networking while freeing up the evening for unsponsored events and dinners. Dress code tends to range from the business casual to business chic (there is the occasional green suit for the gala…costumes optional).

…and moving on to more pressing matters: RSVPs for outside, not-Sirius-sponsored parties hosted by a range of vendors. I’ll just cut to the chase:

 Date  Time  Event Name  Location  Registration URL
 May 7  5:30 PM  ABMargs  Border Grill  bit.ly/2HqBbvW
 May 9  7:00 PM  ABM Royale  Skyfall Lounge  bit.ly/2uOsJk1
 May 9  7:00 PM  Marketing Mingle  Foundation Room  ora.cl/T5FX0

 

Want to hang with Bound?

Bags packed? Request a meeting or visit us at booth 412 (memorized it yet?). Need a ticket? Register with code SPONBOUND for $400 off. Can’t make it? Bummer. You can follow along on Twitter using @bound_360, @Stephanie_Bound, and #SDSummit. When the FOMO resides, go ahead and request a personalization strategy consultation.

Final Notes

Download the event app. Wear comfortable shoes. Bring a jacket (conference centers are cold). See you in Las Vegas!

The post SiriusDecisions Summit 2018: Bound Event Guide appeared first on Bound.