The current need for enforcement of safety regulations

An NPR article reports on safety violations in Kentucky: In December 2016, Pius “Gene” Hobbs was raking gravel with the Meade County public works crew when a dump truck backed over him. The driver then accelerated forward, hitting him a second time. Hobbs was crushed to death. The sole eyewitness to the incident said that … Continue reading The current need for enforcement of safety regulations

An NPR article reports on safety violations in Kentucky:

In December 2016, Pius “Gene” Hobbs was raking gravel with the Meade County public works crew when a dump truck backed over him. The driver then accelerated forward, hitting him a second time. Hobbs was crushed to death.

The sole eyewitness to the incident said that the dump truck’s backup beeper wasn’t audible at the noisy worksite. The Kentucky State Police trooper on the scene concurred. Hobbs might not have been able to hear the truck coming.

But when Kentucky Occupational Safety and Health arrived, hours later, the inspector tested the beeper on a quiet street and said it wasn’t a problem.

“These shortcomings are very concerning,” says Jordan Barab, a workplace safety expert who served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health under President Barack Obama. “Identifying the causes of these incidents is … vitally important.” Otherwise, the employer doesn’t know how to avoid the next incident, he says.

Gene Hobbs’ case is not the exception. In fact, it’s the norm, according to a recent federal audit.

Kentucky is what’s known as a “state plan,” meaning the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has authorized it to run its own worker safety program.

Every year, federal OSHA conducts an audit of all 28 state plans to ensure they are “at least as effective” as the federal agency at identifying and preventing workplace hazards.

According to this year’s audit of Kentucky, which covered fiscal year 2017, KY OSH is not meeting that standard. In fact, federal OSHA identified more shortcomings in Kentucky’s program than any other state.

We know that we must have regulations and enforcement of those regulations to have safe environments. Left to our own choices, people tend to choose what appears to be the fastest and easiest options, not the most safe ones. For an interesting read on the history of safety regulation, see this article from the Department of Labor.

In 1898 the Wisconsin bureau reported that it was often difficult to find safety devices that did not reduce efficiency. Sanitary improvements and fire escapes were expensive, which led many employers to resist their adoption. Constant pressure and attention were needed to obtain compliance. Employers objected to the posting of laws in their establishments and some tore them down. The proprietor of a shoe factory with very poor fire escape routes showed “a disposition to defeat” an inspector’s request for more fire escapes, though he complied in the end. A cloak maker who was also found to have inadequate fire escapes went to the extreme of relocating his operation to avoid compliance. Such delays were not uncommon.

When an inspector found abominable conditions in the dipping rooms of a match factory — poorly ventilated rooms filled with poisonous fumes from the liquid phosphorus which made up the match heads — he tried to persuade the operators to make improvements. They objected because of the costs involved and the inspector “left without expecting to see the changes made.” When a machinery manufacturer equipped his ripsaws with guards after an inspection, a reinspection revealed that the employees had removed the guards.

Without regulation, we’ll be back to 1898 in short order.

How to Make Personalization a Priority in the Travel Industry

Personalization for the travel industry is undergoing a major evolution, and wayfarers and brands are already reaping the benefits. Gone are the days when the most personal element of a guest’s journey was picking their favorite ca…

Personalization for the travel industry is undergoing a major evolution, and wayfarers and brands are already reaping the benefits. Gone are the days when the most personal element of a guest’s journey was picking their favorite candy bar from...

6 marketing trends set to take off in 2019

No longer are marketers focused solely on moving a customer through the funnel. Now, marketers are creating experiences that promote…Read blog postabout:6 marketing trends set to take off in 2019
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No longer are marketers focused solely on moving a customer through the funnel. Now, marketers are creating experiences that promote...Read blog postabout:6 marketing trends set to take off in 2019

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Lion Air Crash from October 2018

From CNN: The passengers on the Lion Air 610 flight were on board one of Boeing’s newest, most advanced planes. The pilot and co-pilot of the 737 MAX 8 were more than experienced, with around 11,000 flying hours between them. The weather conditions were not an issue and the flight was routine. So what caused … Continue reading Lion Air Crash from October 2018

From CNN:

The passengers on the Lion Air 610 flight were on board one of Boeing’s newest, most advanced planes. The pilot and co-pilot of the 737 MAX 8 were more than experienced, with around 11,000 flying hours between them. The weather conditions were not an issue and the flight was routine. So what caused that plane to crash into the Java Sea just 13 minutes after takeoff?

I’ve been waiting for updated information on the Lion Air crash before posting details. When I first read about the accident it struck me as a collection of human factors safety violations in design. I’ve pulled together some of the news reports on the crash, organized by the types of problems experienced on the airplane.

1. “a cacophony of warnings”
Fortune Magazine reported on the number of warnings and alarms that began to sound as soon as the plane took flight. These same alarms occurred on its previous flight and there is some blaming of the victims here when they ask “If a previous crew was able to handle it, why not this one?”

The alerts included a so-called stick shaker — a loud device that makes a thumping noise and vibrates the control column to warn pilots they’re in danger of losing lift on the wings — and instruments that registered different readings for the captain and copilot, according to data presented to a panel of lawmakers in Jakarta Thursday.

2. New automation features, no training
The plane included new “anti-stall” technology that the airlines say was not explained well nor included in Boeing training materials.

In the past week, Boeing has stepped up its response by pushing back on suggestions that the company could have better alerted its customers to the jet’s new anti-stall feature. The three largest U.S. pilot unions and Lion Air’s operations director, Zwingly Silalahi, have expressed concern over what they said was a lack of information.

As was previously revealed by investigators, the plane’s angle-of-attack sensor on the captain’s side was providing dramatically different readings than the same device feeding the copilot’s instruments.

Angle of attack registers whether the plane’s nose is pointed above or below the oncoming air flow. A reading showing the nose is too high could signal a dangerous stall and the captain’s sensor was indicating more than 20 degrees higher than its counterpart. The stick shaker was activated on the captain’s side of the plane, but not the copilot’s, according to the data.

And more from CNN:

“Generally speaking, when there is a new delivery of aircraft — even though they are the same family — airline operators are required to send their pilots for training,” Bijan Vasigh, professor of economics and finance at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, told CNN.

Those training sessions generally take only a few days, but they give the pilots time to familiarize themselves with any new features or changes to the system, Vasigh said.
One of the MAX 8’s new features is an anti-stalling device, the maneuvering characteristics augmentation system (MCAS). If the MCAS detects that the plane is flying too slowly or steeply, and at risk of stalling, it can automatically lower the airplane’s nose.

It’s meant to be a safety mechanism. But the problem, according to Lion Air and a growing chorus of international pilots, was that no one knew about that system. Zwingli Silalahi, Lion Air’s operational director, said that Boeing did not suggest additional training for pilots operating the 737 MAX 8. “We didn’t receive any information from Boeing or from regulator about that additional training for our pilots,” Zwingli told CNN Wednesday.

“We don’t have that in the manual of the Boeing 737 MAX 8. That’s why we don’t have the special training for that specific situation,” he said.

Why Retailers Need AI in the Holiday Season

There’s plenty of hype surrounding Artificial Intelligence. As masterful marketing becomes more and more about a business’s capacity to leverage the best technology, cutting-edge developments like AI command a huge amount of attent…

There’s plenty of hype surrounding Artificial Intelligence. As masterful marketing becomes more and more about a business’s capacity to leverage the best technology, cutting-edge developments like AI command a huge amount of attention in the space. In fact, the...

Human Factors and the Ballot Box

New NPR story on the non-usability of ballots, voting software, and other factors affecting our elections: New York City’s voters were subject to a series of setbacks after the election board unrolled a perforated two-page ballot. Voters who didn’t know they had to tear at the edges to get at the entire ballot ended up … Continue reading Human Factors and the Ballot Box

New NPR story on the non-usability of ballots, voting software, and other factors affecting our elections:

New York City’s voters were subject to a series of setbacks after the election board unrolled a perforated two-page ballot. Voters who didn’t know they had to tear at the edges to get at the entire ballot ended up skipping the middle pages. Then the fat ballots jammed the scanners, long lines formed, and people’s ballots got soaked in the rain. When voters fed the soggy ballots into scanners, more machines malfunctioned.

In Georgia, hundreds blundered on their absentee ballot, incorrectly filling out the birth date section. Counties originally threw out the ballots before a federal judge ordered they be counted.

And in Broward County, Fla., 30,000 people who voted for governor skipped the contest for U.S. Senate. The county’s election board had placed that contest under a block of multi-lingual instructions, which ran halfway down the page. Quesenbery says voters scanning the instructions likely skimmed right over the race.

She has seen this design before. In 2009, King County, Wash., buried a tax initiative under a text-heavy column of instructions. An estimated 40,000 voters ended up missing the contest, leading the state to pass a bill mandating ballot directions look significantly different from the contests below.

“We know the answers,” says Quesenbery. “I wish we were making new mistakes, not making the same old mistakes.”

The story didn’t even mention the issues with the “butterfly ballot” from Florida in 2000. Whitney Queensbery is right. We do know the answers, and we certainly know the methods for getting the answers. We need the will to apply them in our civics, not just commercial industry.

Who’s Hiring in November?

Here are our picks: Sr. Analytics Manager – Experimentation – Ebates.com is looking for a “creative problem solver with a passion for delivering data-driven insight and has experience in leveraging Testing and Experimentation framework to improve customer experience” in San Francisco. Marketing Analyst- Growth Analytics – In Atlanta, Georgia, Pandora is looking for a candidate […]

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Here are our picks:

Sr. Analytics Manager – Experimentation – Ebates.com is looking for a “creative problem solver with a passion for delivering data-driven insight and has experience in leveraging Testing and Experimentation framework to improve customer experience” in San Francisco.

Marketing Analyst- Growth Analytics – In Atlanta, Georgia, Pandora is looking for a candidate to “assist the Marketing Analytics group’s analysis efforts around customer targeting, acquisition, and retention; campaign, audience and subscription forecasting, and KPI tracking as Marketing Analytics works in conjunction with broader Finance, Product, Engineering and Data Science teams.”

Product Manager, Data & Analytics – Join The Walt Disney Company in New York and lead the “analytics-related product development efforts.” “Provide strong input into data tech R&D and data-related critical initiatives, and work on the integration activities with Disney Streaming Services’ analytics technology partners.”

Marketing Analytics Analyst/Data Scientist – The Children’s Place is looking for an analyst to be “responsible for supporting the company’s efforts to create a strong and advanced analytics team focusing on our customer” in Secaucus, New Jersey.

Ecommerce Product Manager – Boxy Charm is looking for a candidate to join their team in Pembroke Pines, Florida to “work with stakeholders across the business to understand needs and build requirements to create and maintain a roadmap for transforming our customers’ experience.”

Executive Director, Chief Marketing Officer – Lenovo in Chicago is looking for a leader to “generate revenue by increasing sales through successful marketing for the entire organization, by driving global marketing and communication, advertising, Public Relations, digital and social media.”

If you are looking to fill a position, give us a shout and we’ll add it to the next careers blog post.

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Mobile Video Optimization And Its Impact On Conversions

Mobile video optimization isn’t only about making videos play smoothly on smartphones of different screen sizes. Popular video hosting sites can help you to that end. Vimeo and Wistia even offer responsive embedded code so that you can upload videos on your landing pages or blogs without worrying about the container size. Even if your […]

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Mobile video optimization isn’t only about making videos play smoothly on smartphones of different screen sizes. Popular video hosting sites can help you to that end.

Vimeo and Wistia even offer responsive embedded code so that you can upload videos on your landing pages or blogs without worrying about the container size.

Even if your website is responsive, embedded videos with fixed width can give your visitors an unpleasant experience. And studies say that half of your users are less likely to engage with you if you give them a bad mobile experience. So, the next time you are planning to embed a video, go for responsive instead of “fixed width.”

Optimizing videos for mobile can be tricky. This article will not just help you fit your videos within the screen of a mobile device, but also help you improve these videos to increase conversions.

We have more video optimization hacks laid out for you below. Dig in.

And note that making videos playable on mobile is not your end goal. What matters more is conversion. Why are we even paying so much attention to mobile?

Mobile Video Optimization: Reasons

The reason we want you to be serious about mobile video optimization is because of these 2 stats:

1. Mobiles give you a wider reach compared to desktops. A study indicates that there are more mobile users now than desktop users.

Source

2. By 2021, 75% of all mobile traffic will come from video content.

Per these 2 points, you get the idea that mobile browsing is on the rise and people like to watch videos, more on the smartphone than on their desktop. Ergo thinking out a mobile-first strategy is crucial for your video marketing success.

After all, it’s much easier to watch a video on your phone. And the cherry? 92% of mobile video consumers share videos with others. That means easy marketing for you—higher views, engagement, and click-throughs!

Let us now move to how videos can be optimized to drive conversions on mobile devices:

Optimization Tip 1: A/B Test Vertical Video Ads

Most videos are designed to play in the landscape orientation. But let’s face it—we hold our phones vertically 94% of the time. So, it can be a hassle to flip your phone just to watch a video and then flip it back. Sounds like a waste of time, right? Many marketers thought so and are now A/B testing their ads with vertical videos.

Source

Vertical videos are popping up as in-app ads too. So far, we have heard a lot of success stories about use of vertical videos.

Chartboost adopted the vertical video ad format, and reported that their advertisers saw up to 20% lift in install per thousand impressions (IPM). That’s great, right?

Even a study from Facebook saw people preferring vertical video content:
– 79% of the novice vertical video consumers were in favor of the vertical video format.
– 65% of respondents applauded brands that are using vertical video for their advertising as “more innovative.”

So, prepare to contribute to this brave new world of vertical video content.

Optimization Tip 2: Use Native Video Uploads to Get More Views

Natively uploaded videos play automatically while you need to click to play videos that have been linked with other platforms. Facebook reports imply that you can achieve as much as 1055.41% higher average share rate with native videos compared to YouTube third-party video links.

So, don’t be a stranger to this native video tactic.

In one of the expert interviews, Matthew Vazquez also asserted the importance of uploading your video separately on YouTube, Vimeo, and Facebook each, and to use modified descriptions with strategic keyword density for all 3 uploads. Matthew says that “this is powerful when done right because now you’ve 3X your SEO potential.”

Source

Optimization Tip 3: Ensure That Your Landing Page Video Is Mobile-Compatible

Conversion prophets have revealed that adding an explainer video on your landing page can boost your conversion rate by
up to 23%.

Source

One of the best landing pages using an explainer video as the conversion bait was that of Dropbox. They had kept their landing page simple with one engaging video and a download button. Visitors watched the video, saw the benefit of using Dropbox, and proceeded to download it. It was a simple funnel, and the conversion rate was high. Reports say that Dropbox earned a million users and bagged a revenue of $48 million.

There are a few problems when it comes to adding a video to your landing page:

– To begin with, ensure that your landing page video is responsive. As we shared in the beginning, you can use Wistia or Vimeo’s responsive embedded code to get this done. These video-hosting platforms offer incredible analytics to help you monitor your video performance. You will get cool insights, such as at which point your viewers are dropping off, and will be able to use these to optimize the playback accordingly.
– Use a thumbnail that prompts visitors to play the video. Never put your landing page video on autoplay. That’s a no-no.
– Keep your video short; 60 to 90 seconds is the best. (Stats say 59% of viewers will watch your video to the end if it’s under a minute.) The idea is to ensure that your video isn’t too heavy and that it shouldn’t lag.
– Position the Call to Action (CTA) button next to the video. Also, ensure that the narrator ends the video with a verbal CTA message, or use text to highlight CTA on the end screen. Try doing both as well.
– Try user testing to see how your target audience interact with the video. Check if they click the video right away or if they are distracted by some other elements on your landing page.

Select these probable issues before spending on PPC campaigns and ads. After that’s done, you will have a landing page with a video that can get you the ROI.

Optimization Tip 4: Ensure that your video has a call to action at the end

Remember those “Please subscribe to our channel.” requests that video makers leave with at the end of the video? These work.

If you watch a video till the end, that means you already like it. So when the creator politely asks you to subscribe, there’s a good chance you would do it.

Call to actions are, therefore, important.

These instruct your users on the next course of action—what they should do after watching the video. So, don’t just put up your CTA message or link in the video description. Say it. Have the narrator of the video conclude your video with the call to action message.

You can also use the actor in the video to point to the CTA button at the end. (If it’s an animation video, use a hand illustration or directional cues.) You will notice that many YouTube video creators use this tactic to request the viewers to subscribe.

There’s another CTA hack. If you are using YouTube, it is its annotation and card features. You can also use these to pop up your CTA link on the screen itself. For mobile users, that makes navigation easier.

Source

Optimization Tip 5: Use typography or subtitles to get a reaction

Your videos should make sense even when muted.

With platforms like Facebook and Twitter having the muted autoplay feature, you are bound to have viewers who will look at your video for a few seconds to determine if it’s worth watching. This means that you can’t afford to have videos that rely only on audio and narration.

Your video should make sense even without the audio or at least provide a context of what’s being presented. Mute your video and see if the idea is being conveyed even without the audio, or if the visual is powerful enough to make the viewers turn the volume up or put on their earphones (if they are at a public place).

Best way—try adding captions or subtitles or use typography animation. Either will help you grab viewer attention, engage them even with a muted video, and get a reaction.

Conclusion

Making your video play on mobile devices is not your end goal. As a marketer and business owner, what matters more is conversion. By using the above optimization hacks, you can get your videos to perform better on mobile.

Just remember the distinct phases of your buyer’s journey. A video designed for customers in the awareness phase may not be appealing to your audience in the evaluation phase or those hesitating at that purchase point.

So, create several types of videos to power your customer’s decision journey.

Conduct a survey acquiring information about your demographics if you want to be painfully precise; but for the most part, develop your content such that it is not inhibited by a small screen. Your videos should have details clearly presented so that these may not get missed out if viewed on a small screen.

This is just the tip of the iceberg. If you have some cool video optimization tips, please share your story in the comments below.

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Why Personalization Matters As Explained By Your Thanksgiving Feast

It’s the night before Thanksgiving, and you’re still trying to plan the menu. While you are thrilled that some rarely-seen relatives have decided to journey to your home for the holiday, they’ve also presented you with a culinary challenge. You realize that with only one turkey, and room on the table for only a few… Read More

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It’s the night before Thanksgiving, and you’re still trying to plan the menu. While you are thrilled that some rarely-seen relatives have decided to journey to your home for the holiday, they’ve also presented you with a culinary challenge. You realize that with only one turkey, and room on the table for only a few side dishes, you won’t be able to give everyone the perfect Thanksgiving feast.

You decide to try and tackle the turkey first since it’s the centerpiece of Thanksgiving. Uncle Bob has requested a fried turkey this year, but cousin Alice from Austin thinks a smoked turkey would be better. You’ve never smoked nor fried a turkey before so it seems like an easy decision to stick to the traditional, which should be good for most of the group.

However you feel bad that Bob and Alice won’t get the turkey they want, so you decide to prioritize them for the sides. They’re both on board for your garlic mashed potatoes. This means though that the mashed sweet potatoes won’t fit on the main table, and will need to stay in the kitchen. Your mother will only eat the sweet potatoes and has a bad ankle. Is it fair to make her walk to the kitchen every time she wants more?

You could move the green bean casserole to the kitchen and leave all the potatoes on the table. Meanwhile your brother-in-law, Caleb, asked if the green bean casserole could use gluten free fried onions, and you’re still trying to decide if that would work for everyone or if it would taste noticeably different.

You’re completely lost when it comes to desserts. Your family will only eat pecan pie but your mother-in-law is severely allergic. It seems logical to make pumpkin, but how can you not have the pie that half your guests want?

Luckily you’re only faced with this conundrum once a year. Destination marketers, however, face this challenge daily. Instead of a turkey, they need a homepage hero that still appeals to in-state, out-of-state, and special interest visitors. They might not need to worry about someone walking the extra steps to the kitchen, but they struggle with keeping content easy to find so that brides looking at wedding venues or business travelers coming for a conference don’t need to dig through page after page of general vacation trip ideas.

Reimagine this Thanksgiving feast/website with personalization. Most guests would see the traditional turkey hero, but Uncle Bob and cousin Alice see the turkeys they want. Your mother doesn’t need to “walk” to the kitchen, because you’ve set a fly-in on the sides content that takes her right to the sweet potatoes. That pecan pie that can’t get near your mother-in-law? You’ve set rules to exclude her from ever seeing it.

We hope YOUR Thanksgiving is delightful and there are no challenges with planning. If you’re interested in learning how to take your website to the next level with personalization request a consultation to see how we fit in with your current marketing strategy.

The post Why Personalization Matters As Explained By Your Thanksgiving Feast appeared first on Bound.

What Happens When Data Meets Creative (and How to Make it a Reality at Your Company)

There are quite a few people out there that just don’t *get* creative. They don’t understand the way in which we work or make decisions. And, indeed, creative teams are known to be cost centers rather than revenue generators. To certain execs, creatives are simply the sneaker-wearing hipsters who are brought in to make things […]

The post What Happens When Data Meets Creative (and How to Make it a Reality at Your Company) appeared first on Brooks Bell.

There are quite a few people out there that just don’t *get* creative. They don’t understand the way in which we work or make decisions. And, indeed, creative teams are known to be cost centers rather than revenue generators. To certain execs, creatives are simply the sneaker-wearing hipsters who are brought in to make things look pretty or sound good.

While this is a far cry from reality, it’s also not that hard to understand why. As creatives, we understand the value of good creative work. Proving that value, however, can be difficult. So here are a few tips for proving the ROI of your creative team and incorporating data within your creative process.

Tip #1: Know and Speak the Language of Business.

Smart creative work requires an objective-based approach. Objective-based creative is driven by data—often in the form of user feedback, website analytics, and strategic business goals. As a designer or copywriter, your job is to gather and digest this data and apply it to your work.  

When pitching your concepts to your stakeholders, most aren’t going to accept work that just “looks” better. It’s important that you are able to articulate the business problem, your target audience and the objective-based reasoning behind your decisions. This ensures that your work is influenced by hard data and research, rather than just design preferences.

On the other side, it’s important to train your stakeholders in the art of objective-based feedback. That is, feedback in the context of whether or not your work is effective in addressing the objective at hand. Doing this takes time, practice and a lot of patience, but the payoff is huge. Your executives will feel more confident after seeing that your creative team is aligned and hyper-focused on providing measurable value.

Tip #2: Use Testing to Eradicate B.S. in the Creative Process.

Brooks Bell was founded on the idea that you can eliminate creative guesswork by applying the scientific method. But at many companies, creative and UX teams rarely engage with testing teams. While this might make sense from the perspective of your org chart, few realize just how much collaboration between these functions could positively impact a business.

A few years back, my team and I were brought in to work with one of our retail clients. Looking at their website data, our analysts realized that a large majority of people were abandoning the express checkout form for the full checkout form. This seemed counterintuitive to us: less friction is always better, right? Why would anyone prefer to fill out the long form!?

In order to develop a strategy to test, we needed more data—so we turned to user research. We polled a select group of users about their purchasing experience and uncovered some potential reasons for their behavior.

We discovered that many users preferred to use alternative or saved payment methods, yet the account login and gift card payment options were only available in the full checkout experience. We ran a test adding these options to the express checkout flow, which resulted in a 5% lift. When implemented, this test translated to a $5M increase in revenue.

The impact of this was significant—and not just from a revenue perspective. Through this process, we were able to identify other areas where users could be experiencing anxiety. It also prevented us from over-designing in the future. For this company’s customers, a simple and clear message and a less cluttered experience were enough to quell their anxiety.

For data-starved creatives, these types of insights can be extremely valuable and can greatly influence the company’s overall design aesthetic.

Tip #3: Be Sure You Recruit Relevant User Groups for Discovery Research

This tip is for you if—upon presenting the results of your user research—you’ve ever been asked “why did you talk to [audience group]?” or the alternative: ”why didn’t you talk to [audience group]?”

Sure, conducting guerilla research on random mall-goers or your coworkers at lunchtime will get you basic usability feedback. But if you want actionable insights, you need to not only research the group that’s generating the most business for your company, but also the group that’s most impacted by the problem you’re trying to solve.

If return users drive the majority of your revenue, don’t research new users. Similarly, don’t ask someone to look at your mobile design if they don’t fit the demographics of the segment you’re trying to reach.

Here at Brooks Bell, we believe it’s important for our clients to be closely involved in the process of selecting user segments for research. This not only manages the scope of the project and ensures maximum impact, but it also helps to avoid the frustrating line of questioning I mentioned above.

Tip #4: Embrace Survey-Based Research

If you’re well-versed in usability testing, you know that elaborate usability tests are a waste of resources and you really can get the best results from testing no more than 5 users.  But to an executive, that number 5 can seem awfully small. And no matter how many times you reference or point them to this blog post, they still might just not buy it.

This is where survey-based research comes in. We’ve had tremendous success in conducting survey-based research for our clients, and find it is often better received by executives.

Executives respond well to survey research for a couple of reasons: You can survey a larger population of people. It’s fast—most of the time we get responses back within a day or two. And finally, depending on the types of questions you ask, it’s largely quantifiable.

While surveys are different from usability tests, oftentimes, you can use survey results to back up your usability test results.

Finally, it’s important that you also become the master of your research domains and empower yourself to dig in on your own.  For this, pivot tables are a great tool. Pivot tables unlock the magic of Excel by allowing us to take all of our survey results and slice and dice them any way we want… filtering answers by segments, averaging, counting, and creating data visualizations all without ever having to talk to an analyst.

How many of you thought you’d leave this post adding Excel to your list of preferred programs? 😉

Tip #5: Don’t Hoard Your Ideas – Bring Others Into the Creative Process

It’s every designer’s tale of despair: you spend tons of time on a project—putting in extra hours to make sure every pixel has been pushed into the perfect position, every line kerned and leaded—only to have your work completely shat on upon unveiling it.

Trust me on this one: hoarding your ideas and excluding other from your design process really only sets you up for disappointment, depression and frustration.  

So stop with the big reveal and instead invite others into the design process. Voice your ideas in a collaborative way. Position yourself as a guide within a creative process in which the objective is to build something collaboratively. Without a doubt, you’ll find you’ll get things approved faster and more frequently.

 


Interested in learning how Brooks Bell can help empower your creative and UX teams with data? Learn more about our services or contact us today.

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