How to hire your testing unicorn (without using magic)

When I was running my own testing program, I was in desperate need of an associate to help me manage my small (but mighty!) team. My single associate and I were launching tests left and right and we were unable to do anything other than focus on the day-to-day of the program. A job description […]

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When I was running my own testing program, I was in desperate need of an associate to help me manage my small (but mighty!) team. My single associate and I were launching tests left and right and we were unable to do anything other than focus on the day-to-day of the program.

A job description had been posted and the company’s recruiters were doing everything they could to find the right hire.

I remember reaching out to an old friend of mine to see if she knew anyone who might fit the role. I told her that I was looking (simply) for a data-driven individual with stellar communication skills and the ability to manage several complicated web projects at one time.

“Oh,” she said. “So you’re looking for a unicorn.”

“No, Susan… I’m looking for a Testing Specialist.”

Now, I don’t want to be too dramatic here, but this unicorn revelation did rock my world a bit. (It also made me want a bowl of rainbow sorbet with sprinkles… but I digress.)

When I finally overcame this existential testing crisis, I realized that I believed, deep down, that testing unicorns did exist. But I also knew that due to magic (obviously), I might never find one.

There were three main things I was looking for in my unicorn:

  1. Strong analytics skills and the ability to develop advanced data-driven recommendations
  2. Amazing communication skills – for helping stakeholders understand and action off of that data
  3. Organized and efficient project management skills for planning and managing the execution of test strategies

First, I had to assess which skills I already had on my team.

I took a look at my own skills and the skills of the team I had in place. To be honest, I’m much better at talking about analytics than I am at sitting behind a desk and doing a deep dive into the numbers.

My personal strength is in the communication realm of testing and my associate was an awesome project manager. So, it became pretty clear to me that there was a need for a strong analyst on our team.

Then, I had to decide what was teachable.

This is where things get controversial. Because teachable skills can really depend on the skills of the trainee, the trainee’s willingness to learn, and the skills of the trainer.

I did a quick poll here at Brooks Bell to see which skills my colleagues believe is the toughest to teach.

As you can see, many people here believe that good communication skills are hard to coach. And during my search for a Testing Specialist, I felt the same way.

I was pretty confident that I would be able to help my next hire become a better analyst or project manager, but I wasn’t so sure I could teach someone to communicate well in a stakeholder-facing role.

Finally, I had to decide if I could tweak my program structure

Depending on my next hire’s strengths, there were a few scenarios that I had to consider in order to structure my program without a unicorn. Here are a few examples:

If I decided to hire a strong analyst with weak communication skills

In this scenario, I would consider making this Testing Specialist role a non-stakeholder facing role. Because this person would not be project managing or communicating directly with stakeholders, they would be solely dedicated to analytics and free up the rest of the team’s time to focus on project management and stakeholder communication.

If I decided to hire a strong project manager with weak analytics skills

Because I believed that analytics skills were teachable, this associate could focus on project management in the beginning and slowly take on analytics work when they were ready.

If I decided to hire a strong communicator with weak project management skills

In this scenario, I would start by putting this associate in a stakeholder-facing role focused on analytics. After some time, I would begin training him or her on project management.

The magical lesson I learned

When I first approached this seemingly impossible task of hiring my next Testing Specialist, I was discouraged by the reality that I wanted so many specific skills in one individual.

But the truth is, Experimentation and Optimization is still a very niche industry, so finding a single person with so many abilities is going to continue to be tough for a while. That’s why I recommend first looking at the structure of your team, and then deciding which skills you feel comfortable teaching.

And always remember this: Testing unicorns do exist, sometimes we just have to help them find their wings.

Are you a testing unicorn looking for your next big challenge? Check out our monthly “who’s hiring” post for open positions in testing and personalization at top companies.


About the Author:

Sam Baker has eight years of experience running experimentation and digital analytics programs for major e-commerce brands. As a consultant at Brooks Bell, she helps global brands build and grow their testing programs.

In addition to her role at Brooks Bell, Sam is also an accomplished career coach, providing guidance to ambitious women looking to land their dream careers. Originally from Indiana, Sam now lives in Raleigh, North Carolina with her husband and her dog.

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Who’s Hiring in July?

Here are our picks: Manager, Ecommerce Optimization – Chewy’s eCommerce analytics team is looking for a qualified candidate to “lead strategy, standards and processes around a/b and multivariate testing” across the Chewy site and apps in their Boston, Massachusetts location. Senior Product Manager- Optimization – Join Microsoft’s Digital Stores Experimentation team in Redmond, Washington to “lead business groups […]

The post Who’s Hiring in July? appeared first on Brooks Bell.

Here are our picks:

Manager, Ecommerce Optimization – Chewy’s eCommerce analytics team is looking for a qualified candidate to “lead strategy, standards and processes around a/b and multivariate testing” across the Chewy site and apps in their Boston, Massachusetts location.

Senior Product Manager- Optimization – Join Microsoft’s Digital Stores Experimentation team in Redmond, Washington to “lead business groups to generate customer insights and drive incremental value through online experimentation.”

Front-End Web Developer – In Bay Minette, Alabama, Standard Furniture Manufacturing is looking for a developer to “work with marketing to create designs and information technology in technical implementation, having an active role on both sides in implementing the best user experience on websites and applications.”

UX Experience Designer – Urban Outfitters, Inc. is “seeking an empathetic, human-centered User Experience (UX) Designer in Philadelphia to join URBN’s Digital Product team; a centralized group, tightly aligned with URBN brands and the IT organization, specializing in user experience, product management, testing & analysis, digital strategy, and program management.”

Vice President, Digital Marketing Strategy and Operations – In Overland Park, Kansas, SelectQuote Insurance Services is looking for a “digital leader to drive the following marketing channels: Search Engine Marketing, Pay per Click Networks, Search Engine Optimization, Retargeting, Social, Display, Affiliate, and all emerging digital channels.”

Manager, Testing & Personalization – LuckyVitamin is seeking a Testing and Personalization Manger in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania to “lead and execute their website optimization and personalization strategy.”

Senior Data Science Analyst, Claims – Join NJM Insurance Group’s Data & Claims Analytics team in West Trenton, New Jersey.  This role will take the lead on “collaborating with business and IT partners to develop predictive analytic solutions and/or tools that enable data-driven strategic decision-making.”

Software Engineer – Mobile and Front-End Application Developer – MedRhythms is seeking a Software Engineer in Portland, Maine, with “experience in all forms of front-end development for mobile applications and web sites with data processing, analysis, and visualization.”

Sr Manager, Digital Testing & Optimization – In Philadelphia, Comcast is looking for a candidate to “optimize conversion, revenue, transactions and customer satisfaction on Comcast’s digital experiences. This position will own A/B and Multivariate testing strategy development and execution.”

Director of Platform Analytics – Join Groupon in Chicago to “lead an Analytics team tasked with leveraging data-driven insights to drive revenue growth for North American Groupon business. The team this individual will lead is tasked with providing data-driven insights to guide product roadmaps and prioritization across consumer product and impression optimization areas.”

Help us, help you!  Trying to fill a position in experimentation?  Send us your posting and we’ll include it on our next post!

 

The post Who’s Hiring in July? appeared first on Brooks Bell.

B2B Digital Marketing Strategy Survey Results

Our most recent email series introduced a step-by-step approach to website personalization strategy. The strategy series outlined the five elements of a successful strategy: Solutions, Segmentation, Targeting, Tactics, and Optimization inspired by the Website Personalization Strategy eBook. In each email, we asked our B2B marketing subscribers one question about their digital marketing strategy. Let’s take […]

The post B2B Digital Marketing Strategy Survey Results appeared first on Bound.

Our most recent email series introduced a step-by-step approach to website personalization strategy. The strategy series outlined the five elements of a successful strategy: Solutions, Segmentation, Targeting, Tactics, and Optimization inspired by the Website Personalization Strategy eBook. In each email, we asked our B2B marketing subscribers one question about their digital marketing strategy. Let’s take a look at what you all had to say.

What is your #1 marketing challenge?

50% of marketers surveyed answered “Not enough qualified leads.” This echoes the most common goal that our customers seek to solve with personalization.

Are you segmenting your website audience for anonymous visitors?

Only half of respondents are segmenting for anonymous visitors—that means the other half are ignoring 95% of their audience.

How are you targeting with paid media?

A significant 86% of marketers surveyed said they are targeting their paid media based on buying role or persona attributes. It would be seamless for the majority of B2B marketers to mirror this persona-based experience on their website.

Where are your buyers abandoning their journey?

30% of respondents don’t know where buyers are abandoning their journey and 60% know they’re dropping out of the journey in the Consideration and Decision phases. There is an urgent need for responsive nurture throughout the buyer’s journey.

On average, how often do you review your digital campaigns?

Over half of the marketers surveyed review their digital campaigns weekly. All of your digital campaigns drive to your website. How often are you reviewing and optimizing your website strategy?

Get the definitive guide to a successful website personalization strategy in the Website Personalization Strategy eBook.

If you’d like to receive our email communications, join the newsletter!

The post B2B Digital Marketing Strategy Survey Results appeared first on Bound.

Eight Mistakes Every Rookie Experimentation Team Makes (& How to Avoid Them)

If testing were easy, everyone would do it. But that’s simply not the case. Rather, experimentation requires extensive learning, hard work, lots of experience and a unique set of skills to consistently produce results that have a meaningful impact on a business. At Brooks Bell, we’ve spent the last fifteen years helping global brands build […]

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If testing were easy, everyone would do it. But that’s simply not the case.

Rather, experimentation requires extensive learning, hard work, lots of experience and a unique set of skills to consistently produce results that have a meaningful impact on a business.

At Brooks Bell, we’ve spent the last fifteen years helping global brands build and scale their experimentation programs. Drawing on that experience, we’ve identified eight common mistakes that rookie experimentation teams often make in the first few months of testing. We’ve also detailed useful and actionable strategies to help you navigate these challenges as you work to establish your optimization program. 

Mistake #1: Testing Without a Hypothesis

While the importance of a hypothesis may seem obvious, it’s easy to get swept up in the excitement and politics of launching the first test without realizing you haven’t determined a clear expectation for the outcome.

Without a defined hypothesis, it’s difficult (if not impossible) to make sense of your test results. Additionally, a well-articulated hypothesis can shape the entire test creation, evaluation, analysis and reporting process. It also makes communication and coordination across teams—another common challenge for new programs—much easier.

Learn strategies to avoid this misstep, along with seven other common rookie mistakes for newly established experimentation teams. Get the white paper.

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6 Questions to Ask Before Selecting a Personalization Vendor

Your team has explored all options for improving conversion optimization. You’ve identified that a website personalization tool is the best option for streamlining your customers’ digital experiences. But how do you choose a personalization vendor that will help you get the impact you are planning for? We’ve put together a list of questions to ask […]

The post 6 Questions to Ask Before Selecting a Personalization Vendor appeared first on Bound.

Your team has explored all options for improving conversion optimization. You’ve identified that a website personalization tool is the best option for streamlining your customers’ digital experiences. But how do you choose a personalization vendor that will help you get the impact you are planning for?

We’ve put together a list of questions to ask your website personalization vendors to evaluate how well they fit with your strategy.

Does this vendor specialize in my industry?

Sure, every vendor wants to help you, but are they really built to? There are a few ways specialization benefits you: the tool with have the right set of features, the team will have the right set of experience, and the ecosystem (data options, tech connections, agency relationships, etc.) will fit your needs. If your industry does not fall within a vendor’s specialization, evaluate how much of their time and attention they will spend to learn your needs and act on them.

How does the solution personalize for first-time visitors?

This is a big one! Log into your website analytics platform right now. Look at your first-time vs repeat visitors. Which number is bigger? A good personalization vendor has both the data and the methodology to identify anonymous visitors. Listen closely to the attributes they list (hint: it should go beyond geography, industry, or account) and the approach they take for identifying as much of your anonymous audience as possible.

What is the vendor’s approach to personalization?

Let’s face it: you’re not looking into personalization for the sake of personalizing…or at least you shouldn’t be. We recommend looking for vendors that take an outcome-based approach. For example, you might be looking to grow traffic to targeted sections of your website, increase form submissions, or boost inbound contact requests. Have your goal in mind and ask how your vendor plans to support you in reaching it. Remember, strategy comes from people, not platforms.

What is the total cost of investing in this solution?

Vendors differ by what they include in the quoted price. Here is the laundry list of items to consider: platform access, data connections, technical support, initial implementation, training, strategy development, reporting, ongoing management, and ongoing strategy optimization. Be sure to ask about the scope, limits and in-house availability of these items.

How does this solution fit with the rest of our tech stack?

No technology is an island. Understand the flow of information and actions between this vendor and the rest of your stack. You are not looking for a vendor that connects with everything, just with the things that are necessary to meet your goal. If a vendor doesn’t connect with a technology you think is relevant, talk with the vendor about why you think this connection is relevant to your goal and ask if there are other ways to meet this need.

How long does it take to get started?

This question is fairly straightforward; however, make sure to clarify what “get started” means. Does it include time to configure the software, set a strategy, launch a campaign, and report on results? For example, with Bound, you could turn on your first campaign in less than 15 minutes. But do you really want to start fiddling with your number one marketing asset without an informed strategy? We didn’t think so.

We hope you find these questions and considerations for choosing a personalization vendor to be useful. If Bound isn’t already on your personalization vendor shortlist, please request a consultation to see if we are a fit.

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The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 6 of 6]

Welcome to our six-part series on building a successful website personalization strategy. This is the final post in the series. Want the full picture? Start from the beginning! In the last post, we discussed tactics, the final planning stage of your personalization strategy. In this post, we talk about the testing, measuring, and learning necessary […]

The post The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 6 of 6] appeared first on Bound.

Welcome to our six-part series on building a successful website personalization strategy. This is the final post in the series. Want the full picture? Start from the beginning!

In the last post, we discussed tactics, the final planning stage of your personalization strategy. In this post, we talk about the testing, measuring, and learning necessary to optimize a website personalization strategy.

Personalization is in the website optimization category for a reason: optimization is a process—it’s never done. If you think about it, all of marketing is a process. How often marketers revisit each element varies, but nothing we do—from updating nurture series to account prioritization—is every really done. In reality, website personalization, like marketing, is an iterative process requiring constant optimization towards a success metric.

How often should you optimize web personalization? We encourage customers to think of two main types of personalization programs: always-on and conversion-based.

Always-on personalization programs are the strategic messaging for your website. For example, a marketer might choose to personalize their homepage hero for target industries or company sizes. Because always-on personalization plays might not point directly to a point of conversion, we encourage marketers to measure success based on website engagement metrics like bounce rate, time on site, and click-through rate. After some initial testing and calibration, the customer might choose to revisit these messages only as often as they update personas, campaign themes, or positioning. On average, customers choose to update strategic messaging on an annual basis.

Conversion-based personalization programs support a specific marketing program. For example, a marketer might choose to serve a fly-in promoting a whitepaper to target prospects who have not yet viewed that asset. Much like marketers use channels like paid media, social, email, and direct mail to support a program, conversion-based website personalization should be used to support specific marketing goals like event registrations, resource downloads, contact us requests, or cross-sell inquiries. On average, customers choose to update conversion-based personalization plans every three months, which tends to align with quarterly marketing goals and planning cycles.

Be warned! Most marketers want to do everything at once. Our customers find the most success getting up-and-running quickly with one to two conversion-based programs while they take more time to build out always-on personalization programs. Over time, our most advanced customers are able to successfully run multiple conversion-based programs at a time.

What solution are you optimizing towards? Understanding your audience? Increasing conversions? Expanding accounts? With the goal in mind, execute on steps one through four of the website personalization strategy and then iterate. Below are the steps to maximize and optimize web personalization strategy.

Optimize Web Personalization to Results

  • Review audience insights – Have the target personas changed? What’s the biggest segment of the website audience that is not getting personalization?
  • Review conversion-based program success – Did the stated programs meet their goals in the given time period? How much success was attributable to personalization programs?
  • Review audience health – What percent of each target audience converted? Did engagement metrics improve, hold steady, or decline?
  • Review content feedback – What is the most popular content topic by audience? What content type performed best?
  • Review organizational goals – Did what are the upcoming marketing goals? Do your personalization programs need to chance to support them?

website personalization strategy optimization

Web personalization, like marketing, is a process. It takes a plan, discipline, and dedication to optimize. It takes technology, data, and expertise to be successful. The personalization experts at Bound partner with innovative marketing organizations to guide strategy and optimize web personalization to meet their marketing goals.

If you’re interested in seeing if website personalization is right for you, request a personalization consultation today.

Download the eBook The Fundamentals of a Successful Website Personalization Strategy: The Focus Required to Earn Results to learn more!

The post The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 6 of 6] appeared first on Bound.

The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 5 of 6]

Welcome to our six-part series on building a successful website personalization strategy. We will publish a new post each week. Sign up for our newsletter to get updates! In the last post, we determined which data sources feed personalization plays. Next, we’ll describe how to develop personalization tactics that best engage your prospects. Personalization tactics are simply […]

The post The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 5 of 6] appeared first on Bound.

Welcome to our six-part series on building a successful website personalization strategy. We will publish a new post each week. Sign up for our newsletter to get updates!

In the last post, we determined which data sources feed personalization plays. Next, we’ll describe how to develop personalization tactics that best engage your prospects.

Personalization tactics are simply the delivery vehicles for your personalization messages. The three main categories of tactics are embedded, overlay, and redirect.

Embedded tactics are the subtlest delivery of personalization. These tactics, including text modification and graphic replacement, present your webpage with more tailored text or relevant images. Personalization with embedded tactics will feel most natural to your visitor – like your product or service was built for them.

Overlay tactics are the most attention-getting delivery of personalization. These tactics, including fly-ins, banners, and modals, are served on top of the webpage, in addition to on-page messaging. Personalization with overlay tactics is most effective for prompting action from a visitor.

Redirects are the most assertive delivery of personalization. This tactic confidently declares, “We know who you are and what you need.” Personalization with redirects is excellent for directing visitors to account hubs, microsites, and webpages for well-defined lines of business.

How will you deliver the perfect message when your target audience visits your site?

Personalization Tactics

  • Text modification – Tailor text on your website including copy, headlines, and buttons. For example, show a light CTA for a first-time visitor and a more aggressive CTA for a repeat visitor.
  • Graphic replacement – Swap out one or more graphics on a page to help engage a visitor. For example, change the hero image to a factory when manufacturing visitors arrive on the homepage.
  • Fly-ins – Slide in a small content block with an image, text and/or CTA. For example, serve a link to the next piece of content in that buyer’s journey.
  • Banners – Drop down a full-page-width bar with informative or time-sensitive text. For example, remind webinar registrants of the upcoming webinar.
  • Modals – Interrupt a visitor with centralized window that requires an action or acknowledgement before continuing. For example, deliver an important product alert only to product users.
  • Redirect – Simply redirect the web visitor to a more relevant webpage. For example, redirect automotive homepage visitors to your existing automotive solutions page.
  • Triggered Live Chat – An interactive chat session triggered for a specific audience with a tailored message. For example, “Would you like to speak with our Healthcare IT experts?”

Congratulations, you’ve finally built a personalization strategy! Are you ready to begin executing? Hang on. There’s one final step in evaluating your results and iterating towards success which we’ll address in the next post!

Tactics for website personalization

About the personalization strategy series

In this multi-part blog series, we’ll break down each of these five critical elements to building a website personalization strategy. In the next post, we’ll talk through determining which personalization tactics are right for your business challenges.

Download the eBook The Fundamentals of a Successful Website Personalization Strategy: The Focus Required to Earn Results to learn more!

The post The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 5 of 6] appeared first on Bound.

The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 4 of 6]

Welcome to our six-part series on building a successful website personalization strategy. We will publish a new post each week. Sign up for our newsletter to get updates! In the last post, we highlighted how to develop web personalization plays to solve key business problems. Next, we’ll evaluate targeting options to make personalization perform. How will you target […]

The post The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 4 of 6] appeared first on Bound.

Welcome to our six-part series on building a successful website personalization strategy. We will publish a new post each week. Sign up for our newsletter to get updates!

In the last post, we highlighted how to develop web personalization plays to solve key business problems. Next, we’ll evaluate targeting options to make personalization perform.

How will you target visitors?

Now that you’ve identified how you want to group your web audience to meet your business goals, how will you identify which group a visitor belongs to?

It’s helpful to think about the data sources for web audience targeting in two buckets: known and anonymous visitors.

Known visitors have identified themselves via form fill or clicked a link in an email sent through marketing automation. In other words, known visitors have performed an action to which your marketing automation platform has assigned a cookie. Typically, your known visitors represent only 3-5% of your web traffic. This is an important 3-5% as it is made up of hand-raising prospects, pipeline, and customers. However, many members of the buying group will still fall in the anonymous visitor category.

Anonymous visitors are cookied by your marketing automation platform but have not identified themselves by name or email. So how can you personalize without knowing who they are? There are two types of identifiers for anonymous visitors: IP addresses and 3rd party cookies. Each type has its strengths, which is why Bound built 360 Persona Technology TM to layer together multiple data sources to provide the broadest and most accurate identification. Bound’s data partners identify anonymous visitors’ demographics, firmographics, behavior, and intent—you can even layer these elements with your known visitor data.

Bound leverages various data partnerships to help us identify known and anonymous user attributes:

Data Types for Targeting

  • Demographic – Individual attributes such as seniority, functional area, education, income, gender, and age. Partner examples: Bombora
  • Firmographic – Company attributes such as company name, domain, location, revenue, industry, employee count. Partner examples: ClearBit, Kickfire, DemandBase, Bombora
  • Intent – Individual intent based on trends in offsite research performed prior to visiting your site. Partner examples: Bombora
  • Behavior – Behavioral attributes such as time on site, number of visits, remarketing, traffic source, device, pages visited, time of day, IP address and geolocation. Native to Bound
  • Marketing Automation – Visitor attributes from marketing automation and CRM platforms such as marketing program participation, the pipeline stage, custom MAP fields, and lead scores. Partner examples: Marketo, Eloqua

Once you’ve decided which business challenge you are trying to solve, pick your personalization plays and map the data sources you’ll need, you’re ready to tackle tactics!

targeting is an important element of personalization strategy

About the personalization strategy series

In this multi-part blog series, we’ll break down each of these five critical elements to building a website personalization strategy. In the next post, we’ll talk through determining which personalization tactics are right for your business challenges.

Download the eBook The Fundamentals of a Successful Website Personalization Strategy: The Focus Required to Earn Results to learn more!

The post The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 4 of 6] appeared first on Bound.

The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 3 of 6]

Welcome to our six-part series on building a successful website personalization strategy. We will publish a new post each week. Sign up for our newsletter to get updates! In the last post, we talked through setting goals for your personalization strategy. Next, we’ll describe how to choose personalization plays to meet your goals. How will you solve […]

The post The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 3 of 6] appeared first on Bound.

Welcome to our six-part series on building a successful website personalization strategy. We will publish a new post each week. Sign up for our newsletter to get updates!

In the last post, we talked through setting goals for your personalization strategy. Next, we’ll describe how to choose personalization plays to meet your goals.

How will you solve your challenge?

Personalization plays are meaningful groupings of your web audience for the purpose of reaching your stated business goals. Let’s break this concept down further.

First, personalization plays define audiences both among and within your market segments. You may be wondering why we don’t just call personalization plays “segmentation.” With Daniel Yankelovich’s 1964 Havard Business Review piece, market segmentation became the foundation of marketing strategy. Moving the practice beyond basic demographic information such as age, sex, and income, Yankelovich created the norm of positioning each brand or product for specific need-based segments. While traditional segmentation certainly influences your personalization strategy, personalization plays are often characterized as groups within your defined market segments.

Next, personalization plays are specific to your web audience. Your web audience is unique in two important ways: 1) it represents people who are relatively in-market for your product or service and 2) it is 95% anonymous. Personalization plays must be developed with these concepts in mind.

Finally, personalization plays must point back to your stated business objective. For example, if your business goal is to close deals faster, role-based plays are probably more effective than industry-based plays. By nature, some plays work best for each top-of-funnel, middle-of-funnel, and bottom-of-funnel goals. Others, like account-based plays, apply throughout the funnel.

We’ve outlined the most common personalization plays our customers use to help solve their business challenges:

Personalization Plays

  • Industry and/or company size – Engage prospects or customers from key industries. Leverage existing industry-based content, tailor website messaging and feature relevant products by industry or company size.
  • Account – Engage prospects or customers from key accounts. Determine the optimal message for key accounts and direct those prospects to bespoke content.
  • Role – Engage key buying roles. Direct them to areas of the website most relevant to them and deliver persona-based messaging through their buyer’s journey.
  • Intent – Engage prospects based on offsite intent. Position the right product or deliver a stronger call to action for in-market visitors.
  • Geography – Engage prospects or customers from different geographies. Promote location-specific events, programs, or messaging.
  • Program engagement – Engage prospects or customers based on previous marketing interactions. Use activity from your marketing automation platform to determine what content or messaging to serve.

Each of these personalization plays support business objectives uniquely and require specific types of data to effectively implement.

personalization segmentation personalization plays

About the personalization strategy series

In this multi-part blog series, we’ll break down each of these five critical elements to building a website personalization strategy. In the next post, we’ll talk through determining how to target those prospects to engage them with your plays.

Download the eBook The Fundamentals of a Successful Website Personalization Strategy: The Focus Required to Earn Results to learn more!

The post The Fundamentals of Website Personalization Strategy [Part 3 of 6] appeared first on Bound.

Our top 7 blog posts of 2017

Back in January, we published a post on “digital marketing trends for 2017“. In it, WiderFunnel experts and industry influencers…Read blog postabout:Our top 7 blog posts of 2017
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Back in January, we published a post on “digital marketing trends for 2017“. In it, WiderFunnel experts and industry influencers...Read blog postabout:Our top 7 blog posts of 2017

The post Our top 7 blog posts of 2017 appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.