Google Analytics 4: A breakdown of Demographic and Tech details reports

Google Analytics 4’s navigation might look bare compared to Universal Analytics. But here’s where you can find hidden reports in GA4.

The post Google Analytics 4: A breakdown of Demographic and Tech details reports appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Google Analytics 4 may look simple on the surface, but there’s more to it than meets the eye. Did you know that there are multiple reports hidden in GA4?

Out of the box, the left-side navigation in GA4 looks pretty bare.

There are only 18 reports vs. the 90+ (not including integration reports) in Universal Analytics. 

But contrary to popular belief, GA4 actually has a lot of the same reports built in.

The best examples of this are the GA4 Demographic details and Tech details reports.

Where the reports are in Universal Analytics

In Universal Analytics, these are all separate reports and each report is separated into subcategories as seen below.

Universal Analytics - Various reports separated in subcategories.

On top of this, UA sometimes has additional dimensions you can choose from.

For instance, you can switch to “City” instead of “Country.”

But this made it confusing to know whether a report was standalone or another dimension in a single report. 

Universal Analytics - Individual report or primary dimension change?

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The Demographics details report in GA4

Instead of multiple reports and a primary dimension change, GA4 combines all logical demographic dimensions into a single report, the Demographic details report.

The Demographics details report in GA4

The Tech details report in GA4

The same goes for the Tech details report.

The Tech details report in GA4

Here, you get 10 reports in one, including:

  • Browser
  • Device category
  • Device model
  • Screen resolution
  • App version
  • Platform
  • OS version
  • Platform / device category
  • Operating system
  • OS with version

Now that you know where some of your favorite and most used reports have moved to, hopefully, GA4 feels a little more comfortable.

The post Google Analytics 4: A breakdown of Demographic and Tech details reports appeared first on Search Engine Land.

What are the Steps of Conversion Optimization

Having trouble viewing the text? You can always read the original article here: What are the Steps of Conversion Optimization
What is the job of an optimizer? Is it just improving conversion rates? If not, what is the goal of a CRO professional and wha…

Having trouble viewing the text? You can always read the original article here: What are the Steps of Conversion Optimization

What is the job of an optimizer? Is it just improving conversion rates? If not, what is the goal of a CRO professional and what are the steps of conversion optimization? Brian Massey, the Conversion Scientist, shares the steps of conversion optimization. He is the founder of Conversion Sciences, and author of the book “Your […]

The post What are the Steps of Conversion Optimization appeared first on Conversion Sciences.

Reduce Bounce Rates: Ready to Fix Your Conversion Problem?

Having trouble viewing the text? You can always read the original article here: Reduce Bounce Rates: Ready to Fix Your Conversion Problem?
Technically, a “bounce” is a visitor that looks at only one page, or a visitor that spends an embarrassingly shor…

Having trouble viewing the text? You can always read the original article here: Reduce Bounce Rates: Ready to Fix Your Conversion Problem?

Technically, a “bounce” is a visitor that looks at only one page, or a visitor that spends an embarrassingly short time on the page. Keep reading to find out how to reduce bounce rates. A bounce is any visit for which the visitor only looks at one page and does not interact with it. This […]

The post Reduce Bounce Rates: Ready to Fix Your Conversion Problem? appeared first on Conversion Sciences.

How to show Lighthouse Scores in Google Sheets with a custom function

Learn how to use machine learning to streamline your reporting workflows right within Google Sheets.

The post How to show Lighthouse Scores in Google Sheets with a custom function appeared first on Marketing Land.

Automation and machine learning have tremendous potential to help all of us in marketing. But at the moment a lot of these tools are inaccessible to people who can’t code or who can code a bit but aren’t really that comfortable with it.

What often happens is that there ends up being one or two people in the office who are comfortable with writing and editing code and then these people produce scripts and notebooks that everyone else runs. The workflow looks a bit like this:

I will show you a simple way to streamline this workflow to remove the steps where people need to run a script and format the output. Instead they can run the automation directly from within Google Sheets.

The example I will show you is for a Sheets custom function that returns the Lighthouse score for a URL like in this gif:

The method I will show you isn’t the only way of doing this, but it does illustrate a much more general technique that can be used for many things, including machine learning algorithms.

There are two parts:

  1. A Google Cloud Run application that will do the complicated stuff (in this case run a Lighthouse test) and that will respond to HTTP requests.
  2. An Appscript custom function that will make requests to the API you created in step 1 and return the results into the Google Sheet.

Cloud run applications

Cloud Run is a Google service that takes a docker image that you provide and makes it available over HTTP. You only pay when an HTTP request is made, so for a service like this that isn’t being used 24/7 it is very cheap. The actual cost will depend on how much you use it, but I would estimate less than $1 per month to run thousands of tests.

The first thing we need to do is make a Docker image that will perform the Lighthouse analysis when we make an HTTP request to it. Luckily for us there is some documentation showing how to run a Lighthouse audit programatically on Github. The linked code saves the analysis to a file rather than returning the response over HTTP, but this is easy to fix by wrapping the whole thing in an Express app like this:

const express = require('express');
const app = express();
const lighthouse = require('lighthouse');
const chromeLauncher = require('chrome-launcher');

app.get('/', async (req, res) => {
    // Check that the url query parameter exists
    if(req.query && req.query.url) {
        // decode the url
        const url = decodeURIComponent(req.query.url)    
        const chrome = await chromeLauncher.launch({chromeFlags: ['--headless', '--no-sandbox','--disable-gpu']});
        const options = {logLevel: 'info', output: 'html', port: chrome.port};
        const runnerResult = await lighthouse(url, options);

        await chrome.kill();
        res.json(runnerResult.lhr)
    }
});

const port = process.env.PORT || 8080;
app.listen(port, () => {
  console.log(`Listening on port ${port}`);
});

Save this code as index.js.

Then you will also need a file called package.json which describes how to install the above application and a Dockerfile so we can wrap everything up in Docker. All the code files are available on Github.

package.json
{
    "name": "lighthouse-sheets",
    "description": "Backend API for putting Lighthouse scores in Google sheets",
    "version": "1.0.0",
    "author": "Richard Fergie",
    "license": "MIT",
    "main": "index.js",
    "scripts": {
        "start": "node index.js"
    },
    "dependencies": {
        "express": "^4.17.1",
        "lighthouse": "^6.3"
    },
    "devDependencies": {}
}
Dockerfile
# Use the official lightweight Node.js 10 image.
# https://hub.docker.com/_/node
FROM node:12-slim

# Our container needs to have chrome installed to
# run the lighthouse tests
RUN apt-get update && apt-get install -y \
  apt-transport-https \
  ca-certificates \
  curl \
  gnupg \
  --no-install-recommends \
  && curl -sSL https://dl.google.com/linux/linux_signing_key.pub | apt-key add - \
  && echo "deb https://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list \
  && apt-get update && apt-get install -y \
  google-chrome-stable \
  fontconfig \
  fonts-ipafont-gothic \
  fonts-wqy-zenhei \
  fonts-thai-tlwg \
  fonts-kacst \
  fonts-symbola \
  fonts-noto \
  fonts-freefont-ttf \
  --no-install-recommends \
  && apt-get purge --auto-remove -y curl gnupg \
  && rm -rf /var/lib/apt/lists/*


# Create and change to the app directory.
WORKDIR /usr/src/app

# Copy application dependency manifests to the container image.
# A wildcard is used to ensure copying both package.json AND package-lock.json (when available).
# Copying this first prevents re-running npm install on every code change.
COPY package*.json ./

# Install production dependencies.
# If you add a package-lock.json, speed your build by switching to 'npm ci'.
# RUN npm ci --only=production
RUN npm install --only=production

# Copy local code to the container image.
COPY . ./

# Run the web service on container startup.
CMD [ "node", "--unhandled-rejections=strict","index.js" ]

Build the docker image and then you can test things locally on your own computer like this:

First start the image:

docker run -p 8080:8080 lighthouse-sheets

And then test to see if it works:

curl -v "localhost:8080?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.example.com"

Or visit localhost:8080?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.example.com in your browser. You should see a lot of JSON.

The next step is to push your image to the Google Container registry. For me, this is a simple command:

docker push gcr.io/MY_PROJECT_ID/lighthouse-sheets

But you might have to setup the docker authentication first before you can do this. An alternative method is the use Google Cloud Build to make the image; this might work better for you if you can’t get the authentication working.

Next you need to create a Cloud Run service with this docker image.

Open Cloud Run and click “Create service”

Name and adjust settings. You must give your service a name and configure a few other settings:

It is best to pick a region that is close to where most of the audience for your sites live. Checking the site speed for a UK site from Tokyo won’t give you the same results as what your audience get.

In order for you to call this service from Google Sheets it must allow unauthenticated invocations. If you’re worried about locking down and securing the service to prevent other people from using it you will have to do this by (for example) checking from an API secret in the HTTP request or something like that.

Next you must select the container you made earlier. You can type in the name if you remember it or click “Select” and choose it from the menu.

Then click “Show Advanced Settings” because there is further configuration to do.

You need to increase the memory allocation because Lighthouse tests need more than 256Mb to run. I have chosen 1GiB here but you might need the maximum allowance of 2GiB for some sites.

I have found that reducing the concurrency to 1 improves the reliability of the service. This means Google will automatically start a new container for each HTTP request. The downside is that this costs slightly more money.

Click “Create” and your Cloud Run service will be ready shortly.

You can give it a quick test using the URL. For example:

curl -v "https://lighthouse-sheets-public-v4e5t2rofa-nw.a.run.app?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.example.com"

Or visit https://lighthouse-sheets-public-v4e5t2rofa-nw.a.run.app?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.example.com in your browser.

The next step is to write some Appscript so you can use your new API from within Google Sheets.

Open a new Google Sheet and the open up the Appscript editor.

This will open a new tab where you can code your Google Sheets custom function.

The key idea here is to use the Appscript UrlFetchApp function to perform the HTTP request to your API. Some basic code to do this looks like this:

function LIGHTHOUSE(url) {
  const BASE_URL = "https://lighthouse-sheets-public-v4e5t2rofa-nw.a.run.app"
  var request_url = BASE_URL+"?url="+encodeURIComponent(url)
  var response = UrlFetchApp.fetch(request_url)
  var result = JSON.parse(response.getContentText())
  return(result.categories.performance.score * 100)
}

The last line returns the overall performance score into the sheet. You could edit it to return something else. For example to get the SEO score use result.categories.seo.score instead.

Or you can return multiple columns of results by returning a list like this:

[result.categories.performance.score, result.categoryies.seo.score]

Save the file and then you will have a custom function available in your Google Sheet called LIGHTHOUSE.

The easiest way to get started with this is to copy my example Google Sheet and then update the code yourself to point at your own API and to return the Lighthouse results you are most interested in.

Enhance your spreadsheet know-how

The great thing about this method is that it can work for anything that can be wrapped in a Docker container and return a result within 30 seconds. Unfortunately Google Sheets custom functions have a timeout so you won’t have long enough to train some massive deep learning algorithm, but that still leaves a lot that you can do.

I use a very similar process for my Google Sheets addon Forecast Forge, but instead of returning a Lighthouse score it returns a machine learning powered forecast for whatever numbers you put into it.

The possibilities for this kind of thing are really exciting because in Search Marketing we have a lot of people who are very good with spreadsheets. I want to see what they can do when they can use all their spreadsheet knowledge and enhance it with machine learning.

This story first appeared on Search Engine Land.

https://searchengineland.com/how-to-show-lighthouse-scores-in-google-sheets-with-a-custom-function-343464

The post How to show Lighthouse Scores in Google Sheets with a custom function appeared first on Marketing Land.

The Perils of Using Google Analytics User Counts in A/B Testing

Many analysts, marketers, product managers, UX and CRO professionals nowadays rely on user counts provided by Google Analytics, Adobe Analytics, or similar tools, in order to perform various statistical analyses. Such analyses may involve the statistic…

Many analysts, marketers, product managers, UX and CRO professionals nowadays rely on user counts provided by Google Analytics, Adobe Analytics, or similar tools, in order to perform various statistical analyses. Such analyses may involve the statistical hypothesis tests and estimations part of A/B testing, and may also include regressions and predictive models (LTV, churn, etc.). […] Read More...

The Effect of Using Cardinality Estimates Like HyperLogLog in Statistical Analyses

This article will examine the effects of using the HyperLogLog++ (HLL++) cardinality estimation algorithm in applications where its output serves as input for statistical calculations. A prominent example of such a scenario can be found in online contr…

This article will examine the effects of using the HyperLogLog++ (HLL++) cardinality estimation algorithm in applications where its output serves as input for statistical calculations. A prominent example of such a scenario can be found in online controlled experiments (online A/B tests) where key performance measures are often based on the number of unique users, […] Read More...

Step-by-Step Guide for Google Analytics 2016

Google Analytics stands apart in a league of its own as the best tool for understanding your web traffic and conversions. Yet, as the best tool, it can be confusing and overwhelming to figure out. In this article, we first look at how you set up an account in Google Analytics, and then we look […]

Step-by-Step Guide for Google Analytics 2016

Google Analytics stands apart in a league of its own as the best tool for understanding your web traffic and conversions.

Yet, as the best tool, it can be confusing and overwhelming to figure out.

In this article, we first look at how you set up an account in Google Analytics, and then we look at some more advanced tips for making it work for you.

Here’s your step-by-step guide for Google Analytics:

Get Started

To make use of the wide reporting options, you first need to set up an account. Follow these straightforward steps:

  1. Visit Google Analytics.
  2. If you don’t have a Gmail address, you’ll need to create one.
  3. If you do have a Gmail address, simply sign in to your account.
  4. Once inside Google Analytics, name your account with your company name, website name and provide your website’s URL.
  5. Google will then provide you with tracking code. You’ll want to copy this code and insert it into all of the pages of your website. You can either add it yourself to your html code, or if you’re using WordPress, use a plugin to do it for you.
  6. Give it a few days before you start looking at reports.

Now that you’ve got the set up done, let’s dive into the advanced tips.

Set Up Goals

You want to track your conversions, so you will use conversion goals to measure them.

Setting up goals allows you to dig deep into the performance of your website. You’ll learn if your website visitors are actually doing what you want them to do.

To set up your goals, we recommend using the SMART method.

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Achievable
  • Relevant
  • Time based

You want to be extra sure that your goals are measurable.

So, the first thing you want to do is decide the action that defines a specific conversion on your website. Google Analytics then uses your goals to track the conversion. Once the goal is achieved, the conversion is logged.

Some examples of goals include:

  • Purchase
  • Newsletter sign up
  • Online registration
  • Information request
  • Download

Next, you want to either create or decide on a destination page. For example, if you want your user to sign up for your newsletter (this is the goal), then the destination page would be the thank you page they land on after completing the task.

This tells Google Analytics that your website visitor completed your form.

Once you’ve got your goal and your destination page, you can set up Goal Tracking.

  1. Visit the Admin tab.
  2. In the View column, click Goal.
  3. Click on +New Goal.
  4. Select a template that meets your needs. Choose from Revenue, Acquisition, Inquiry and Engagement. These are shown to you based on your industry.
  5. Click continue to name your goal.
  6. Choose how you will track your goals. In most instances, you’ll use your destination page.
  7. Click continue and paste in the URL of your destination page.

Measure Conversions

Your Goals are set, and Google Analytics will get to work recording your conversions.

It’s now time to measure your website conversions. Deciphering your reports can be confusing. Here’s how to view them.

You’ll notice a Goal Conversion Rate. This shows the percentage of your page visits that resulted in the conversion you defined in your goal.

This is a key part of your reporting as this is perhaps the best indicator to gauge the effectiveness of your page.

For example, if your conversion rate is high, you’re obviously bringing in good website traffic. This means you’re doing something right.

Yet, if your conversion rate is low, you need to change something on your website. It could be the image, headline, text, call to action, colors, etc. A low conversion rate means you aren’t meeting the needs of your customers.

It’s ideal when you see your goal conversion rate continue to increase over time. This means you’ve refined your landing pages for the best conversion rates.

Next, take a look at your Goal Completions. This number shows you exactly how many website visitors converted. This is a tangible number you can use in your marketing reports.

Third, you want to look at the Goal Value. This is very simple – it’s the monetary value of your conversions.

Conversions are great, but the Goal Value number tells you what each of those conversions is worth to you monetarily.

Understand Your Audience

Now, we’re going to touch on how to evaluate your audience in Google Analytics. Why is this important?

It lets you know if you’re reaching the right people in the right way. You’ll learn things about your website visitors such as:

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Location
  • Interests
  • Browsers
  • Mobile Devices

On the left-hand side in Google Analytics, you’ll see the category for your Audience. Open each of these sections, paying special attention to Demographics and Geo.

Get familiar with your Acquisition report as well. This report shows you how your website visitors arrived on your site.

This helps you know if it was email, social media, organic or pay-per-click.

Discovering the data in these reports helps you learn what works best for driving traffic to your website to help you increase your goal conversions.

Your audience reports can also tell you how many page views your website had. For example, if a visitor landed on your site and visited five pages, you can see where he went.

You can also view the number of new and returning visitors.

Think about your website goals. Are you after new or returning visitors? This is where you’ll see if you’re meeting your goals.

Take a look at your visitor flow as well. This helps you see where people came from.

To Conclude

In this guide, we’ve touched on just a few of the many things Google Analytics has to offer.

Once you’ve set up Google Analytics on your website, you have access to an abundance of information.

You want to use that information to make changes and additions to your website so you can continue to improve your conversion rate.

You’ll find it relatively easy to set up Google Analytics and view your first set of simple reports.

We do encourage you to get started with Goals as they can really help you gauge your conversion rate. Use our advanced tips to get started and stick with it.

The more you use Google Analytics, the more comfortable with it you’ll become.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by tracking your conversions in Google Analytics? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Louis Llerna

Average Session Duration- What is it and Why Bloggers Should Care

There are a lot of stats to look at when viewing Google Analytics and average session duration is one of them. This article will cover what is average session duration and why bloggers should care about it. Even if you’re not a blogger, you may want to read in on this. Average Session Duration –…

The post Average Session Duration- What is it and Why Bloggers Should Care appeared first on Diamond Website Conversion.

average-session-duration-200x200There are a lot of stats to look at when viewing Google Analytics and average session duration is one of them. This article will cover what is average session duration and why bloggers should care about it. Even if you’re not a blogger, you may want to read in on this.

Average Session Duration – What is it?

According to Google,

Average session duration is total duration of all sessions (in seconds) / number of sessions.

A single session is calculated from the first time someone views your page, to the last page view of that person. So, if someone enters your site and visits a few places, say 5, on it that takes them 10 minutes, then their session is 10 minutes, or 600 seconds. If their session is one page and only 30 seconds, then their total session is 30 seconds.

The average session duration is taking the total time of the session divided by the number of sessions during a specific date range.

Average Session Duration – Why Bloggers Should Care

Average session duration can be influenced by bounce rate, page views,and sessions, but for some, this could be a indicator of how much people like to stay on specific areas of your website. For bloggers, this allows them to know if an article has been well received.

Google loves long form content. This has been said over and over by many leaders in the SEO industry. However, Google also has suggested that content in a post be at least 300 words.

Well, 300 words doesn’t take long to read. If you’re a blogger that constantly published content that ranges around 300 words, you’re not really beefing up the potential of time that your readers are spending on your website. Often, the reader will skim through in under a minute, possibly comment, and then leave.

Rather than giving the reader a “wham bam thank you mam” experience, why not do some of the following to possibly increase the average session duration, and thusly your reader’s interest in remaining on your website:

  • Create a series of posts and interlink them. People who have an interest for the topic will click to each topic and stay on the site longer.
  • Always find ways to link to other relevant posts in your website. Whether it’s a specific term that you explain or some other relevant content, this gives the reader a possible option to be curious enough to click that link and read more.
  • Have cornerstone content that is lengthier and filled will several methods in which the reader can digest your content. Aside from long form text, don’t forget that you can add images, video and audio to expand upon your point. Cornerstone content is usually quite lengthy (more than 1500 words), and sometimes may even seem like it should be in an ebook.
  • Don’t forget to link to your services, encourage visitors to comment, or ask readers to subscribe to your newsletter. It’s your website, don’t be shy. All of these encourage some type of positive action that brings them to another place on your website.

Most bloggers will probably look more at their page views, but seriously, if you’re setting goals on individual pages, you may want to also focus on whether people are staying on those pages or going to the places you want them too.

Have you taken the time to look at your site or individual article’s average session duration?

The post Average Session Duration- What is it and Why Bloggers Should Care appeared first on Diamond Website Conversion.

The Best Google Analytics Reports for Improving Websites

Google Analytics isn’t just for knowing how much traffic your website is getting, your top pages, and how your traffic sources and marketing efforts are performing. Nope. There is an even better use for it!…

best google analytics reports

Google Analytics isn’t just for knowing how much traffic your website is getting, your top pages, and how your traffic sources and marketing efforts are performing. Nope. There is an even better use for it!

It’s also really important to use it to help improve your website – so it converts many more visitors into sales, leads or subscribers. But unfortunately Google Analytics can be a little daunting at times, particularly with seemingly endless reports to check out and analyze. Where should you start for best results?

To help you make sense of this, I’ve created a list of the best Google Analytics (GA) reports so you can quickly gain more insights into your website performance and what needs improving most. I have also recently included a video of me walking you through these great reports. Let’s get started…

The best Google Analytics reports to improve your website

Update: Watch a video of me guiding you through these key Google Analytics reports

Last year I created a premium video about these best Google Analytics reports. It was originally part of a paid membership but I have decided to now include it on this article for everyone to watch for free. In this video you will also learn how to create a Google Analytics dashboard for these reports. Enjoy!

Check the landing pages report for pages with high bounce rates and low conversion rates
Your top landing pages (entry pages) are crucial to optimize because they often get very high levels of traffic, and are the first pages your visitors see on your website. If visitors don’t find what they are looking for or are confused, they will leave your website often within just 5 seconds!

To improve your website with this report, pull up the your landing pages report for the last 30 days (found under ‘Behavior > Site Content > Landing pages’).  Then see which pages out of the top 10 have highest bounce rate (over 50% is high) and which have lower than website average goal conversion rate (both indicated below in yellow) – these are indicators of poorly performing pages on your website.

Then optimize these poor page performers first – improving headlines, benefits, imagery and call-to-action buttons are some of the best ways to do this. Optimizing these helps increase visitor engagement and increases the chances of them converting for your key website goals. You should also ensure you show your unique value proposition more prominently on them.

Google Analytics landing pages report bounce rate and conversion rate

Analyze your Funnel Visualization report for high-drop off rates and optimize
It doesn’t matter how good your website is if visitors struggle to get through your checkout or sign-up flow pages. To understand how well your visitors complete that process, its vital you check your Funnel Visualization report. On this report (found under ‘Conversions > Goals > Funnel Visualization’) you can see how many visitors get through each page of your funnel (like your billing page), and which pages are most problematic – even where they go if they go to another page.

You need to pay great attention to any pages with a high drop off rate (more than 40%) and optimize those first – adding security seals and risk reducers, reducing distractions like header navigation, and improving error handling often work well. Improving these pages will greatly increase your conversion rate, and therefore your sales or signups.

Google Analytics funnel visualization report

Note: Obviously you will need to have made sure you have setup your goals for your website adequately, including adding key pages in your goal flows. Here is a great guide on setting goals up.

Check your traffic overview report for poor performing traffic sources
Improving the quality and quantity of your traffic has huge impact on your website conversion rates, sales or leads, and its vital you gain insights into traffic performance and optimize the major sources.

To help you gain greater insights into this, pull up the ‘Channels’ report as Google calls it (found under ‘Acquisition > Channels) and check which of your top 10 traffic sources (channels) have high bounce rates (over 50%), or a goal conversion rate that is much lower than your website average. This is particularly important to do for any source that you are paying for like paid search or display advertising, as you will need to optimize these quickly to reduce your wasted spending.

You should also look for traffic sources that seem low or missing from the top 10 channels. For example, you may find your email traffic source isn’t as high as you had hoped for or isn’t converting well, so you should optimize your email marketing campaigns as soon as possible.

Google Analytics acquisition overview report

Note: You may even find your email marketing campaigns are not being attributed correctly to the email traffic channel, which can be fixed by using campaign tracking codes for your emails. I highly recommend doing this to monitor the success of your email marketing efforts.

Discover insights from your organic search ‘not provided’ keywords

You have probably noticed that when you look at your top organic search keywords report that a very high percentage of them are ‘not provided’. This is because users are often logged in to Google when they search and they won’t share their keywords with you for privacy reasons.

Instead of just giving up, you can actually gain insights about what these ‘not provided’ keywords are likely to be. You can do this by finding out which landing pages are most often arrived on from keyword searches. Simply go to Acquisition > Search Console > Landing Pages, and then filter the report for top ‘clicks’ (click on that column header). This shows you which pages visitors are most often seeing when they arrive via keywords. You will then often be able to infer which of your keywords relate to these pages (especially when you cross reference it with your keywords that are provided in your organic search keywords report).

For example, my top organic search landing page is actually this article you are reading, and when I look at my top keywords searches, I see that ‘best google analytics reports’ shows up in my top 10 search keywords, so that is likely to be the keyword that drives me the most traffic. This organic search landing pages report also shows other very useful metrics like conversion rate for goals, so you can also infer how well your keywords are converting – something that no other SEO tool can tell you either.

How to find 'not provided' keywords in Google Analytics

Use the mobile overview report for tablet/mobile insights
Mobile traffic is bigger than ever before, often accounting for over 40% of total website traffic depending on your type of website – and these visitors have very different needs due to smaller screen sizes, and often convert much lower than regular website traffic.

To understand your mobile traffic, and its performance, you need to check your ‘mobile overview’ report (found under Audience > Mobile > Overview). Here you need to see just how high your traffic levels are for both mobile and tablet devices, and see what the conversion rate for each is. If conversion rate is much lower for any, you need to check your website on that device for key issues and fix them immediately – in particular ensure you have a mobile optimized version of your website.

Note that mobile conversion rates are often lower than desktop conversion rates because these visitors are often just browsing when they are not at home and not ready to purchase or sign up, but anything under 0.50% mobile conversion rate is considered very low.

Google Analytics mobile overview report

Check the exit pages report to find problematic pages
You also need to find out which pages are most often causing your visitors to leave (called an ‘exit’ page) – and improve and optimize those too.

To find these top exit pages, check your ‘exit pages’ report (found under ‘Behavior > Site Content > Exit Pages). In particular look for any pages that shouldn’t be in the top 10, and try to figure out why so many people exit your site on them. Also look for pages with especially high exit rate (over 50%), as this often indicates problems. I recommend that you also use Hotjar to gain insights into why visitors are leaving on these pages.

A few ways to improve these top exit pages is by using and optimizing call-to-action buttons at the end of them (the wording and style of them in particular), and try using exit intent popups to show a great incentive (discounts/free guides etc) before visitors leave your website.

Google Analytics exit pages report

Analyze the top pages report for key missing pages and high exit rates
Your top pages report can contain some real gems for insights – and not just what your top 10 pages currently are. You can find this report under Behavior > Site Content > All Pages.

First check if any of your top pages have high exit rates (over 50%) and optimize those as soon as possible. You should also to check if any pages relating to your key goals seem missing from this report or have low traffic. For example, perhaps few people are visiting your important ‘why us’ or benefits page – making links more prominent to these pages will hopefully drive more traffic to them and increase the sales or leads coming from them.

Google Analytics top pages report

Check the browser report for poor conversion rate performers
Your webpages can sometimes look slightly different or even break in some browsers (often due to small differences in how browsers show CSS code). This can unknowingly cause you many lost sales or leads.

To make sure this isn’t negatively impacting your website, you need to regular check the ‘Browser & OS’ report (found under ‘Audience > Technology) and make sure your conversion rates aren’t much lower for any browsers. If you see ones on this report that are much lower, you should go ahead and check for technical problems like CSS rendering issues and fix them immediately.

Google Analytics browser report

These are the simpler reports, there’s many advanced ones too

These are just some of the simpler Google Analytics reports that will help you improve your website. Here are a couple of the many more advanced ones to learn about:

  • Using the ‘Converters’ visitor segment to figure out the behavior of people who convert for your main website goals (sales/leads etc).
  • Using the ‘Site Search’ report to find pages causing most amount of internal searches (indicates visitors not finding what they need).

If you are interested in learning more about these advanced GA reports, simply comment and let me know.

No time to analyze Google Analytics reports or not good at it?

If you don’t have time or the skills to gain insights from your Google Analytics reports you should check out my ‘Google Analytics Insights’ service – I’m sure you will find it useful for  improving your website.

How to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics

You can link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics? Why yes you can! In doing so, it allows you to integrate all the services of each into one big tool to measure the behavior of your site’s traffic. This allows you to dig deeper into how people are searching your website so you can see what…

The post How to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics appeared first on Diamond Website Conversion.

how-to-link-webmaster-tools-with-google-analytics-200x200You can link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics? Why yes you can! In doing so, it allows you to integrate all the services of each into one big tool to measure the behavior of your site’s traffic. This allows you to dig deeper into how people are searching your website so you can see what they are looking for the most. Aside from their capabilities, the great thing about having both of these tools are that they are absolutely free. The only thing you need to do in order to take advantage of them, are to sync them together.

This article will show you how to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics.

How to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analtyics

Before you can link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics, you need to sign up for a Google account. After you have a Google account, you need to sign up for Google Webmaster Tools and Google Analytics. You will need to submit your website to each of them and add their tracking code onto your website.

The best tool to add the tracking code from Google Analytics or get your site crawled by Google Webmaster Tools, especially for WordPress users, is to use Google Analytics for WordPress, and WordPress SEO by Yoast, both of which are handy plugins.

After you’ve installed the tracking codes, either manually, or using the recommended plugins if you’re a WordPress user, then you need to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics.

Step 1. You can link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics by going to the Google Analytics tab called Admin. After you’ve clicked to go to the Admin section, there are 3 columns. Look for the middle column that says Property. You want to click on the link that says All Properties. (Note: Right click on the image below to open in a new tab or window in order to see how you can navigate to where you need to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics.)

link-webmaster-tools-to-google-analytics

Step 2. On the All Properties page, if you scroll, you’ll see all sorts of Google properties listed. You will want to find the Google Webmaster Tools section.

webmaster-tools-all-property-page-in-google-analytics

Step 3. Fill out the form and hit save. On this page you’ll want to also decide if you want to enable features like Demographics and Interest Reports Advertiser Features, and In-Page Analytics.

The Demographics and Interest reports basically collect information on your visitors in regards to age, gender, and their interest. The Advertiser Features give you options not available in regular use of Google Analytics and give you the ability to remarket with the platform, as well as have DoubleClick integration, reporting on Demographics and Interests, and reports on Google Display Network Impression.

As a note, while in this step, please make sure that you’ve hooked your website up to Google Webmaster Tools. The website has to be verified or this will not work right. Click save when you’re done.

webmaster-tools-link-to-google-analytics

The process in how to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics doesn’t take long at all. If you’ve already hooked your website up with each Google property, then it’s pretty easy to do.

Have you linked your Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics?

The post How to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics appeared first on Diamond Website Conversion.