Who’s Hiring in September?

Pumpkin spice is not the only thing in surplus this month, take a look at some job postings around experimentation and personalization. Here are our picks: Director, Digital Strategy – Universal Orlando is looking for a Director to “champion the consumer’s journey across channels to achieve business and campaign objectives and collaborates with leaders of […]

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Pumpkin spice is not the only thing in surplus this month, take a look at some job postings around experimentation and personalization.

Here are our picks:

Director, Digital Strategy – Universal Orlando is looking for a Director to “champion the consumer’s journey across channels to achieve business and campaign objectives and collaborates with leaders of non-digital channels to ideate and recommend campaign integration opportunities.”

Senior Web Experimentation Lead – The marketing experimentation team at esurance is looking for a leader to “embed an experimentation culture into the esurance DNA in San Francisco. This role will deliver increased cost savings, additional revenue and industry leading user experiences through the power of site testing technology and the scientific rigor of controlled experimentation.”

Senior User Experience & Small Business Project Manager –  Lenovo is seeking a candidate in Raleigh, NC to drive “UX projects to improve the online customer experience for Lenovo.com globally. The project manager will manage the identification, conception, definition, design, testing and implementation of UX projects with the goal of improving the customer experience, online engagement and purchase conversion.”

Manager of Digital Testing & Optimization, Analytics – Join the digital analytics and optimization team at L Brands in Reynoldsburg, Ohio and “lead digital testing and optimization efforts. This person will champion the advancement of testing and optimization capabilities and be viewed as the optimization evangelist for different brand partners.”

Digital Marketing Manager, Personalization – looking for an ambitious learner to lead a test & learn strategy through experimentation for our digital marketing channels. You will be the leader and subject matter expert of A/B testing with the goal of developing the strategy and approach on personalization.

E-Commerce & Digital Operations Manager – In New York, Zacharys Fine Wine is looking for a candidate to plan and execute “digital and website activities for retail including: content, merchandising, landing pages, site search, product recommendations, personalization, loyalty and other on-site conversion optimization tools.”

Sr. Integrated Marketing Manager – Web Analyst – Microsoft in Redmond, Washington is looking to fill a role to “work with the web lead to strategize, create, manage, execute and optimize web analytics. This includes building experimentation and personalization programs for Dynamics 365 and Power BI.”

Director, eCommerce – “Drive the strategy, development, implementation, and continued improvement of the eCommerce booking experience for Carnival Cruise Line” in Miami, Florida.  “Help lead the presentation across the eCommerce website and mobile app, supporting the integrated programs, promotions and initiatives across the organization.”

Sr Analyst A/B Testing & Site Optimization – Help “drive and support A/B and multivariate testing initiatives on the Homedepot.com site” in Atlanta, Georgia. “The Sr Analyst will be responsible for statistical design, analysis, and reporting aimed at the continued improvement of Homedepot.com onsite experience, with a focus on partnership for making data-driven decisions that drive improved conversion.”

User Experience (UX) Designer – Join the Brooks Bell’s UX team in Raleigh, North Carolina.  “The core function of this role is to research, concept, design, user test, and produce all files needed to execute A/B tests for our clients. This includes creating digital assets that are consistent with the development team’s standards and templates, as well as selecting images, designing layouts, and creating digital experiences that answer user issues outlined by our digital analytics and user research sessions.”

Trying to fill a position in testing and optimization? Send us your posting and we’ll include it on our next post!

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Don’t Make It Weird: 5 Tips for Balancing Privacy & Personalization

Imagine a simple scenario: Your coworkers are participating in a fun run for charity and want you to join. You’re up for it, but you know you need a decent pair of running shoes. The logical solution is to go online, search for information about running shoes and identify a few possible options. You could […]

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Imagine a simple scenario: Your coworkers are participating in a fun run for charity and want you to join. You’re up for it, but you know you need a decent pair of running shoes.

The logical solution is to go online, search for information about running shoes and identify a few possible options. You could order the shoes from an online retailer, but because proper fit is important for running shoes, you decide to visit a specialty retailer at the mall. A salesperson there is friendly and knowledgeable. The store has a pair of shoes you like, in your size. They’re a bit more expensive, but the fitting service added value and there’s no additional shipping cost, so you purchase the shoes on the spot. The next weekend, you run the race and the shoes feel great.

This illustrates a relatively traditional model of consumer decision-making. It begins with a spark that motivates a search for a product. It leads to a research phase, and a consideration set is developed. It then progresses to some type of product experience that narrows the consideration set. Ultimately, a purchase decision occurs and an evaluation of the final product is made.

But today’s online customers may notice a glaring omission from the process: It occurs a week after the run, when you visit a news website. There, in the right column of the page, is an ad for a pair of running shoes. The ad is tailored to your expressed preferences, but not personalized enough to know that a purchase has already occurred.

Seeing these ads, which follow us around the web, can be annoying, unnerving, and even potentially embarrassing. Because the targeting is so crude, it’s obvious that we’ve exchanged some degree of privacy for a marginal—in this case questionable—convenience. And, if this exchange has happened so frictionlessly with one online retailer, how often is it happening elsewhere?

If you can relate to this, you’re not alone. Research has found that consumers generally dislike targeted and personalized advertising. So if personalization makes customers uncomfortable, does this means brands should stop using tailored messages, offers and experiences?

The answer is, decisively, no.

Here’s why: the same body of literature that outlines a negative attitude towards personalization, also highlights the undeniable benefits of personalization. When an ad or message—such as an email subject line—is tailored, even superficially, there is almost always an increase in engagement with the subsequent content.

This contradiction is known as the “privacy paradox.” Consumers are willing to make a long-term trade of personal privacy in exchange for a short-term benefit or convenience, like more relevant advertising or a more specific shopping experience.

But while attitudes toward privacy may contradict behavior, they certainly shouldn’t be ignored. When an ad, message, or experience feels intrusive or creepy, it can diminish the effect personalization could have on your customer and their overall perception of your brand.

Luckily, there are many ways to deliver personalized experiences while also making your customers feel more at ease about their privacy. Here are our tips.

1. Be transparent

Numerous studies have found that the more transparently personalized content is presented, the more effective—and importantly, the more broadly effective—it is.

While making explicit references to data collection and sharing policies can increase privacy concerns, it can also diminish the effect the concern has on consumer behavior.

In an extreme example, Facebook somewhat-recently rolling out a new way for users to see their ad preferences, after the company’s advertisement platform and practices faced scrutiny following the 2016 Presidential Election.

But it doesn’t have to be that complicated. For instance, simply including ad security icons, for example, has been shown to increase the effectiveness of tailored ads even when the icon is unrecognized.

In addition, referencing privacy policies can diminish concerns over data sharing and personalization, even if consumers never read the policy. One study found that consumers interpret a privacy policy as a blank slate populated with all the usual safeguards. This means, of course, the burden is on your company to draft and enforce a responsible privacy policy whenever consumer data is being collected.

2. Be public about your data security efforts

Unsurprisingly, reassuring your customers of data security and describing the efforts you’re taking to protect their data can make them feel more at ease. But the effectiveness of this approach really depends on how much your customers trust your brand and your site. Building this relationship is difficult and can be easily destroyed.

But, if your brand has built a relationship of trust over time and is authentically dedicated to preserving this relationship, referencing the care you have taken to secure private information can not only be a boon to overall perceptions but increase the effectiveness of personalization.

3. Be personal to the right people, at the right time.

In marketing, timing is everything; and the same goes for personalization, it turns out. In e-commerce, personalization is most effective when your customer has established a consideration set and a final decision is about to be made. Additionally, as your customer engages more with a product category or brand, they begin to expect and look forward to a more targeted, relevant experience.  

4. Let newer customers opt-in to personalization

When it comes to moving customers toward a purchase, personalization is more effective in the “pull” direction than in the “push” direction. This means that you should implement personalization with more loyal customers and especially those who have requested more tailored experiences.

For new customers, we suggest waiting to provide personalization until a visitor has shown a specific interest in your company or product: they’ve viewed a few pages on a website, downloaded your app or signed up for your email newsletter. Once this happens, offer a dialog asking “Would you like a more personal shopping experience?”

While it’s true that many visitors may choose to continue on their own, others may not. This also gives you an early opportunity to show your brands’ interest in providing a relevant, convenient shopping experience, which may come into play later once they become loyal customers.

5. Let your customers run the show

Perhaps the most unsettling recommendation for balancing privacy and personalization is to give up some control over the degree of personalization consumers experience. Doing so evokes many of the tips we’ve already covered: it improves transparency, allows consumers to opt into personalization, and helps to build trust. Additionally, offering this service has been found to dramatically improve the effectiveness of personalization, even when some customers actually change settings beyond the default.

Personalization is a powerful tool. The effect personalized messages and experiences have on customers, however, is variable and possibly unpredictable. It’s important that companies balance concerns for privacy and general feelings of intrusion when delivering personalized experiences. Testing these approaches we’ve outlined above will help make your personalization efforts feel less creepy and ultimately, increase the effectiveness of the customer experience.


Transform your customer experience through personalization.

Brooks Bells’ Personalization Jumpstart Program uses a comprehensive, five-step process to help top brands incorporate personalization across their customer experience. Learn more today >> 

The post Don’t Make It Weird: 5 Tips for Balancing Privacy & Personalization appeared first on Brooks Bell.

Expert Brand Building Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit, Part Three

Welcome to Part Three of my blog series covering just a few of the things I learned as an attendee at Klaviyo: BOS – a wonderful two-day summit run by one of my favorite local startups. In Part One I focused on how ecommerce companies can attract…

Klaviyo brand building

Welcome to Part Three of my blog series covering just a few of the things I learned as an attendee at Klaviyo: BOS – a wonderful two-day summit run by one of my favorite local startups. In Part One I focused on how ecommerce companies can attract and convert website traffic to their businesses with session recaps of “Using Google To Grow Your Online Store,” “SEO for Ecommerce,” and “You Got Them To Your Site – What Now?” In Part Two I shared email design tips for nurturing and retaining website leads from these two top-notch sessions: “Email A/B Testing: Beyond the...

The post Expert Brand Building Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit, Part Three appeared first on The Daily Egg.

How To Foster Demand & Convert Shoppers in Q4 | CPC Strategy’s Guide

From brand awareness to demand capture to shopper reactivation — we are experts at implementing sophisticated paid advertising strategies for brands across multiple… > Read More
The post How To Foster Demand & Convert Shoppers in Q4 | CPC Strate…

From brand awareness to demand capture to shopper reactivation — we are experts at implementing sophisticated paid advertising strategies for brands across multiple... > Read More

The post How To Foster Demand & Convert Shoppers in Q4 | CPC Strategy’s Guide appeared first on Retail Performance Marketing Blog - CPC Strategy.

Make Ex-Amazon Prime Members Your New Loyal Customers

In May, Amazon announced one of its most significant changes to ever impact Amazon customer service – a steep 20% increase to the annual fee for Amazon Prime members. Amazon began rolling out the increase to renewing Prime members on June 16th. Accordi…

In May, Amazon announced one of its most significant changes to ever impact Amazon customer service – a steep 20% increase to the annual fee for Amazon Prime members. Amazon began rolling out the increase to renewing Prime members on June 16th. According to a recent survey by Effective Spend, 54% of Prime members are...

The post Make Ex-Amazon Prime Members Your New Loyal Customers appeared first on Conversion Sciences.

9 Things You Can Do Now to Ensure Your Experimentation Program Survives a Reorganization

It often begins with rumors and murmurs. Then, perhaps, a shift in executive leadership. At first, changes seem minor or isolated. But eventually, the inevitable becomes reality—a reorg is underway. Because testing programs typically work with and across several divisions in a business and don’t fulfill a traditional business function, they are particularly vulnerable during […]

The post 9 Things You Can Do Now to Ensure Your Experimentation Program Survives a Reorganization appeared first on Brooks Bell.

It often begins with rumors and murmurs. Then, perhaps, a shift in executive leadership. At first, changes seem minor or isolated. But eventually, the inevitable becomes realitya reorg is underway.

Because testing programs typically work with and across several divisions in a business and don’t fulfill a traditional business function, they are particularly vulnerable during the organizational upheaval.

However, to paraphrase Benjamin Franklin, with an ounce of prevention, it’s possible to avoid a pound of problems. Here are nine practices for surviving a reorg that you can start doing nowbefore you ever have to deal with one.

1. Calculate Impact

The first thing any new leadership will want to see is the value the testing program provides to the business. Of course, “value” is a multidimensional concept. It includes the contribution to business goals and priorities, insight into customer preferences and behavior, development of new innovations, and minimizing certain opportunity costs.

While it’s true all of these things will help communicate the importance and value of testing, nothing will be as compelling as a big annualized impact number. This number can be complex and time-consuming to calculate, but even if it isn’t an important metric for your program today, it’s worth having an analyst crunch, record and update just in case.

2. Write an Elevator Pitch

If you had five minutes or less with the CEO of your company, could you clearly communicate the mission, focus, and value of the testing program in a memorable way? If the answer to that question is “no,” or even “maybe” it’s worth spending some time crafting an elevator pitch for your testing program.

Open your pitch with a short anecdote about a problem that was solved with testing. Next, add a sentence or two about the essential mission of the program. Follow this with a sentence about the methods used. Close with a statement about the contribution the testing program has made to the business as a whole.

Once you’ve written this pitch, practice delivering it to your friends, family, team and other stakeholders. After a lot of practice—and incorporating the feedback you will inevitably receive—you’ll be ready to introduce testing to any new leader or team you may encounter.

3. Archive Results

Surviving a reorg isn’t all about making a case for testing. It’s also about maintaining a consistent pipeline after teams have been shuffled around.

The first step to protecting the testing pipeline is to create a complete, detailed, navigable archive of past test results. This is critical for developing new ideas, training new team members, orienting new teams and stakeholders, and simply making the case for what works and what hasn’t.

Recently, we launched Illuminate, our new software for enterprise-level testing teams. Illuminate offers an executive-friendly repository of your tests and any insights you’ve learned about your customers along the way. It’s direct integration with Optimizely, easy-to-use reporting tools, and custom case study generator significantly simplify the task of archiving and reporting your test results.

4. Outline the Process

Testing is complex and when teams get rearranged, processes that once flowed smoothly can become intractably clogged. To prevent this, document the process as it exists and identify areas of parallelization, possible redundancies, problematic bottlenecks and opportunities for redirection.

If you have access to a project manager, ask her to run a few what-if analyses to estimate potential problems if your processes were to be disrupted. Then, work together to develop possible solutions or workarounds to the most likely scenarios.

5. Clearly Define Roles and Responsibilities

Having a fast and nimble all hands on deck approach to managing the testing process is great until a critical person leaves the company or is assigned to a different team.

To avoid this, define the roles and responsibilities of each team member at each stage of the process. Doing this is critical for mapping the resource requirements of the testing process and quickly identifying gaps if the team is restructured.

It’s also important, however, to track ongoing responsibilities and duties in a more specific way. Having a project management platform or system that identifies what stage of the process each test is in, and which team member is responsible for that task is essential for avoiding disruptions.

6. Develop Training Programs

Looking on the bright side, a reorg could mean your testing team is greatly expanded. It might also mean fewer people are doing more, including jobs they have little experience with. In either case, having a developed and ready-to-execute training program is helpful.

Like all of these tips, the best time to develop a training plan is not the first day your new team member walks into the office. Instead, start training and cross-training your existing team right away. This gives you an opportunity to develop extensive content, deliver it, get a sense of what works, and make adjustments before a reorg renders training critical to the continuation—and not just the improvement—of the program.

7. Centralize Documentation

Having lots of documentation is useless if no one can find it. Moreover, it doesn’t help if it isn’t standardized in some way.
The archive of results, process documents, test plans, training materials, and everything else should be stored in a public or shareable archive, in a format that is easily accessible and navigable.

Using filename conventions, consistent directory structures, and standard documentation practices across the team may be mundane, but it’s just as important to the robustness of the testing program as tracking each person’s ongoing responsibilities.

8. Get essential access

One often overlooked consideration is whether the testing team has access to the essential technologies on which it relies.

Even if most development is done by an outside group, it’s important to have access to tools that enable you to upload and modify your code. Additionally, if reports are pulled by a sovereign analytics team, it’s equally important for someone from the testing program to have the access and ability to do so in a pinch.


Some solutions—like tag management systems—address this challenge. Training, cross-training, and collaboration is another helpful way to build the necessary competencies to get access to and make basic use of all your testing tools.

9. Keep it all up to date

Building the previous eight resources can take a lot of time and effort. Many teams will make any one of them a goal for the quarter, work hard to get it done, drop it in an archive, then forget it.

Months, maybe years, pass without giving the resource a second thought. Then, a sweeping reorg happens and the five-year-old process document is unearthed, dusted off, and found to be frustratingly obsolete. That’s why you must take care to not only produce these resources but maintain them as well.

A reorg can be a scary thing for a lot of reasons. However, by following these nine tips today, even the biggest organizational shakeup doesn’t have to disrupt the flow and productivity of the testing program.

The post 9 Things You Can Do Now to Ensure Your Experimentation Program Survives a Reorganization appeared first on Brooks Bell.

How to hire your testing unicorn (without using magic)

When I was running my own testing program, I was in desperate need of an associate to help me manage my small (but mighty!) team. My single associate and I were launching tests left and right and we were unable to do anything other than focus on the day-to-day of the program. A job description […]

The post How to hire your testing unicorn (without using magic) appeared first on Brooks Bell.

When I was running my own testing program, I was in desperate need of an associate to help me manage my small (but mighty!) team. My single associate and I were launching tests left and right and we were unable to do anything other than focus on the day-to-day of the program.

A job description had been posted and the company’s recruiters were doing everything they could to find the right hire.

I remember reaching out to an old friend of mine to see if she knew anyone who might fit the role. I told her that I was looking (simply) for a data-driven individual with stellar communication skills and the ability to manage several complicated web projects at one time.

“Oh,” she said. “So you’re looking for a unicorn.”

“No, Susan… I’m looking for a Testing Specialist.”

Now, I don’t want to be too dramatic here, but this unicorn revelation did rock my world a bit. (It also made me want a bowl of rainbow sorbet with sprinkles… but I digress.)

When I finally overcame this existential testing crisis, I realized that I believed, deep down, that testing unicorns did exist. But I also knew that due to magic (obviously), I might never find one.

There were three main things I was looking for in my unicorn:

  1. Strong analytics skills and the ability to develop advanced data-driven recommendations
  2. Amazing communication skills – for helping stakeholders understand and action off of that data
  3. Organized and efficient project management skills for planning and managing the execution of test strategies

First, I had to assess which skills I already had on my team.

I took a look at my own skills and the skills of the team I had in place. To be honest, I’m much better at talking about analytics than I am at sitting behind a desk and doing a deep dive into the numbers.

My personal strength is in the communication realm of testing and my associate was an awesome project manager. So, it became pretty clear to me that there was a need for a strong analyst on our team.

Then, I had to decide what was teachable.

This is where things get controversial. Because teachable skills can really depend on the skills of the trainee, the trainee’s willingness to learn, and the skills of the trainer.

I did a quick poll here at Brooks Bell to see which skills my colleagues believe is the toughest to teach.

As you can see, many people here believe that good communication skills are hard to coach. And during my search for a Testing Specialist, I felt the same way.

I was pretty confident that I would be able to help my next hire become a better analyst or project manager, but I wasn’t so sure I could teach someone to communicate well in a stakeholder-facing role.

Finally, I had to decide if I could tweak my program structure

Depending on my next hire’s strengths, there were a few scenarios that I had to consider in order to structure my program without a unicorn. Here are a few examples:

If I decided to hire a strong analyst with weak communication skills

In this scenario, I would consider making this Testing Specialist role a non-stakeholder facing role. Because this person would not be project managing or communicating directly with stakeholders, they would be solely dedicated to analytics and free up the rest of the team’s time to focus on project management and stakeholder communication.

If I decided to hire a strong project manager with weak analytics skills

Because I believed that analytics skills were teachable, this associate could focus on project management in the beginning and slowly take on analytics work when they were ready.

If I decided to hire a strong communicator with weak project management skills

In this scenario, I would start by putting this associate in a stakeholder-facing role focused on analytics. After some time, I would begin training him or her on project management.

The magical lesson I learned

When I first approached this seemingly impossible task of hiring my next Testing Specialist, I was discouraged by the reality that I wanted so many specific skills in one individual.

But the truth is, Experimentation and Optimization is still a very niche industry, so finding a single person with so many abilities is going to continue to be tough for a while. That’s why I recommend first looking at the structure of your team, and then deciding which skills you feel comfortable teaching.

And always remember this: Testing unicorns do exist, sometimes we just have to help them find their wings.

Are you a testing unicorn looking for your next big challenge? Check out our monthly “who’s hiring” post for open positions in testing and personalization at top companies.


About the Author:

Sam Baker has eight years of experience running experimentation and digital analytics programs for major e-commerce brands. As a consultant at Brooks Bell, she helps global brands build and grow their testing programs.

In addition to her role at Brooks Bell, Sam is also an accomplished career coach, providing guidance to ambitious women looking to land their dream careers. Originally from Indiana, Sam now lives in Raleigh, North Carolina with her husband and her dog.

The post How to hire your testing unicorn (without using magic) appeared first on Brooks Bell.

Conversion Optimization Examples: Homepage Carousel vs None

Here are 3 conversion optimization examples of how to kill the “slider”. This is not a post about how carousels kill conversions.  They can, but it’s not about that. This post is about doing what’s best for the people who want to buy …

Here are 3 conversion optimization examples of how to kill the “slider”. This is not a post about how carousels kill conversions.  They can, but it’s not about that. This post is about doing what’s best for the people who want to buy from you on your site. Every CRO and savvy eCommerce manager I...

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Do Online Reviews Really Matter?

Do online reviews really matter, and do they make a difference to your business? The answer is yes, they absolutely do. Consumers increasingly use reviews left by other consumers as part of their pre-purchase research efforts, and a bad review can have…

Do online reviews really matter, and do they make a difference to your business? The answer is yes, they absolutely do. Consumers increasingly use reviews left by other consumers as part of their pre-purchase research efforts, and a bad review can have serious effects on your sales. Herd shopping psychology plays an ever effect on...

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12 Conversion Optimization Tricks That Boost Cart Abandonment Results

Note: This is a guest article written by Brett Thoreson , the CEO at CartStack. Any and all opinions expressed in the post are Brett’s. When selling online, cart abandonment is a fact of ecommerce life. Humans have a limited attention span (just 8 seconds long), as we are filled with deliberation, choices, distractions, and doubts. However, […]

The post 12 Conversion Optimization Tricks That Boost Cart Abandonment Results appeared first on Blog.

Note: This is a guest article written by Brett Thoreson , the CEO at CartStack. Any and all opinions expressed in the post are Brett’s.

When selling online, cart abandonment is a fact of ecommerce life. Humans have a limited attention span (just 8 seconds long), as we are filled with deliberation, choices, distractions, and doubts. However, there are lots of tools out there to help you minimize cart abandonment, but we can’t eradicate it completely.

However, all is not lost. Customers who have abandoned their carts can still be reengaged. And we’re here to help you with top conversion rate optimization tips that will turn those faltering customers into paying ones.

cart abandonment solution in ecommerce

The Basics

Cart abandonment is when someone visits your website, adds items to their baskets, but for one reason or another, fails to finalize the purchase and leaves the transaction incomplete.

Conversion rate optimization (CRO) is a set of practices that helps you to convert visitors into paying customers and avoid, or turn around, cart abandonment.

Two impactful CRO practices that help with cart abandonment avoidance are:

  • Cart abandonment software: Software that tracks a visitor’s journey on your website to: capture emails and track shoppers while they are on your site, watch for them to abandon a cart, and email them following their abandonment, enticing them back.
  • A/B split testing: Running two versions of your website or page that are identical in intent (such as the checkout page) but different in style, allowing you to compare and contrast conversion rates between the two.

Power of Cart Abandonment Software and A/B Testing on Customer Conversions

Alone, these tools are impactful but together they can work in conjunction to produce much powerful results that will make your conversion rates soar and here’s how:

Cart abandonment software relies on shoppers (website visitors) entering their email addresses on your website form, while A/B testing provides you with the insight to optimize your website to ensure that shoppers (website visitors) input their email addresses.

Simply put, A/B testing converts visitors into leads and cart abandonment software converts leads into paying customers.

How to Use A/B Testing and Cart Abandonment Software to Get Email Addresses

There are lot of CRO tips for use when you are A/B testing to see what changes result in increased email conversions. We’ve put together our favorite tips here:

Where

Where you ask people for their email address, is hugely important and impactful. You can have a banner asking people to sign up. It can be part of a registration form, or you can use your cart abandonment software to produce exit intent pop-ups (displayed when visitors look as if they are about to leave). It is estimated that 35% of lost shoppers can be saved by using exit intent pop-ups, but test this for yourself to see if this is true for your customers.

Opt-In Changes

  1. Location

Visual tracking research shows that we browse websites following an F-shaped pattern, favoring the top and left-hand sides. Test your email address opt-ins at both these instances to see which captures more attention.

visual behaviour of visitors in e-commerce

  1. Color and Font

Choosing the right color and font optimization for your call-to-action button is imperative. We’ll discuss color in a little more detail below. Testing background colors and contrasting text that can make your banner stand out, easy to read, and compelling to complete is a significant use of split testing.

  1. Lead Magnets

Lead magnets offer your customers something valuable in exchange of their email addresses. It can be a downloadable guide on this season’s fashions or a report on the top-rated headphones of the year. Test whether lead magnets work or not; and if they do, test many types. Opt-ins of this nature can see up to a 10% conversion rate.

lead magnets as a solution for cart abandonment

Form-Based Changes

  1. Page Layout

As mentioned earlier, humans are easily distracted not only by outside sources but also by items on your website. For a particular VWO customer, removing the navigation menu resulted in a 100% increase in conversions. Try removing your navigation menu from the form page, to reduce distraction, and removing the option to leave the form, and see if these increase your conversions.

  1. Form Layout

Over 70% of online shoppers abandon their cart halfway through the checkout process, meaning that they are also halfway through filling out your form. Some cart abandonment software applications capture email addresses in real time, even if the visitor doesn’t hit Submit. Therefore, test moving the email address field higher up on your shopping cart and checkout pages, to capture the email address before the visitors abandon the page so that you can send them a follow-up email reminder.

  1. Copy

Words are powerful and emotive: They can make people comply, offer, or turn away. Consider how you are asking for shopper’s email addresses and then test different methods, such as explaining why, using personable language, emotive words, or by using less number of words.

pop ups to stop ecommerce abandonment

  1. Field Population

Do visitors respond better to form fields that are pre-populated with example text (such as example@example.com), blank fields, or fields compatible with Google Autocomplete. Understanding what makes your form easiest to complete should help  enable you to tailor it accordingly.

Exit Intent Pop-Up Changes

  1. Color

A pop-up needs to grab visitor attention, and the best way to do this is with color. Split test different colors that contrast with your website brand colors and “pop out.” You may also want take into account well-known color connotations, which differ across countries, cultures, and genders, such as:

Blue: Security

Purple: Luxury

Red: Urgency

Yellow: Caution

While you can’t adapt your website for everyone, you can adapt it to your customer base by seeing what works best for them.

  1. Offers

A great A/B testing idea can be of using different offers to see which offers appeal to your customers more. Research shows trends such as 90% of online shoppers being influenced by the cost of delivery and discount days such as Black Friday, leading to billions of dollars worth of online sales. Test percentage discounts, free delivery, and money off to see what works best for your target audience.

  1. Wording

Your exit intent pop-up wording is crucial. When issuing a pop-up window, you are walking a fine line between frustrating and enticing your customer. If you are interrupting them, test your wording to make sure it demonstrates a good reason.

  1. Fields

Another useful test for pop-up windows is to include the email address field in the exit intent pop-up itself.  This will enable you to capture user email addresses in real time before they exit the pop-up screen.

pop ups as a cart abandonment solution.

  1. Size

Size matters when designing your exit intent pop-up screen. Should it take up the whole page or just the center? Should it be easy to click or difficult?

Results

A/B split testing is a great way to increase your email address conversion rates. It can be then directly used to fuel your cart abandonment software, with the ultimate aim of re-engaging customers who have abandoned their shopping carts.

There are many other tests that you can try for capturing email addresses before cart abandonment occurs. However, the following 12 are our favorites, because they work. Increasing the number of email addresses you capture before cart abandonment and using these addresses in your follow-up cart abandonment email campaign, you can convert over 20% of lost online sales.

 

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