Who’s Hiring in July?

Here are our picks: Manager, Ecommerce Optimization – Chewy’s eCommerce analytics team is looking for a qualified candidate to “lead strategy, standards and processes around a/b and multivariate testing” across the Chewy site and apps in their Boston, Massachusetts location. Senior Product Manager- Optimization – Join Microsoft’s Digital Stores Experimentation team in Redmond, Washington to “lead business groups […]

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Here are our picks:

Manager, Ecommerce Optimization – Chewy’s eCommerce analytics team is looking for a qualified candidate to “lead strategy, standards and processes around a/b and multivariate testing” across the Chewy site and apps in their Boston, Massachusetts location.

Senior Product Manager- Optimization – Join Microsoft’s Digital Stores Experimentation team in Redmond, Washington to “lead business groups to generate customer insights and drive incremental value through online experimentation.”

Front-End Web Developer – In Bay Minette, Alabama, Standard Furniture Manufacturing is looking for a developer to “work with marketing to create designs and information technology in technical implementation, having an active role on both sides in implementing the best user experience on websites and applications.”

UX Experience Designer – Urban Outfitters, Inc. is “seeking an empathetic, human-centered User Experience (UX) Designer in Philadelphia to join URBN’s Digital Product team; a centralized group, tightly aligned with URBN brands and the IT organization, specializing in user experience, product management, testing & analysis, digital strategy, and program management.”

Vice President, Digital Marketing Strategy and Operations – In Overland Park, Kansas, SelectQuote Insurance Services is looking for a “digital leader to drive the following marketing channels: Search Engine Marketing, Pay per Click Networks, Search Engine Optimization, Retargeting, Social, Display, Affiliate, and all emerging digital channels.”

Manager, Testing & Personalization – LuckyVitamin is seeking a Testing and Personalization Manger in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania to “lead and execute their website optimization and personalization strategy.”

Senior Data Science Analyst, Claims – Join NJM Insurance Group’s Data & Claims Analytics team in West Trenton, New Jersey.  This role will take the lead on “collaborating with business and IT partners to develop predictive analytic solutions and/or tools that enable data-driven strategic decision-making.”

Software Engineer – Mobile and Front-End Application Developer – MedRhythms is seeking a Software Engineer in Portland, Maine, with “experience in all forms of front-end development for mobile applications and web sites with data processing, analysis, and visualization.”

Sr Manager, Digital Testing & Optimization – In Philadelphia, Comcast is looking for a candidate to “optimize conversion, revenue, transactions and customer satisfaction on Comcast’s digital experiences. This position will own A/B and Multivariate testing strategy development and execution.”

Director of Platform Analytics – Join Groupon in Chicago to “lead an Analytics team tasked with leveraging data-driven insights to drive revenue growth for North American Groupon business. The team this individual will lead is tasked with providing data-driven insights to guide product roadmaps and prioritization across consumer product and impression optimization areas.”

Help us, help you!  Trying to fill a position in experimentation?  Send us your posting and we’ll include it on our next post!

 

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Converting Customers in the Fashion Niche

Straight facts from an Online Fashion Brand As internet marketers, our goal is to convert as many customers as possible with the lowest spend on advertising. Converting Customers in the fashion niche is one thing but understanding how to properly conve…

Straight facts from an Online Fashion Brand As internet marketers, our goal is to convert as many customers as possible with the lowest spend on advertising. Converting Customers in the fashion niche is one thing but understanding how to properly convert your customers varies from niche to niche. Knowing how to analyze data and find...

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“Alexa, how do I A/B test my voice-enabled customer experience?”

Another Amazon Prime Day has come and gone, and we’re betting many in the e-commerce space are now breathing a little easier. But looking beyond the challenges Amazon poses for other online retailers, the company’s foray into AI, smart speakers and similar devices presents a new opportunity for online brands to reach consumers; a channel […]

The post “Alexa, how do I A/B test my voice-enabled customer experience?” appeared first on Brooks Bell.

Another Amazon Prime Day has come and gone, and we’re betting many in the e-commerce space are now breathing a little easier.

But looking beyond the challenges Amazon poses for other online retailers, the company’s foray into AI, smart speakers and similar devices presents a new opportunity for online brands to reach consumers; a channel that—in our humble opinion—is begging to be tested.  

Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant, Jarvis, Watson…the list goes on

Various studies over the last year have shown that 20% of online searches are conducted using voice-based technologies and this is expected to increase to 50% by 2020.  This means the time to get on board with voice-based experiences is now—whether you’re looking to build your own AI assistant, make your site more friendly for voice searches, or just simply identify where voice-based technologies can enhance your customer experience.

As part of a continuous effort to help our clients capitalize on new technologies and strategies to deliver a better customer experience, our development team recently challenged themselves to build an Alexa Skill with an integrated A/B test function (if you’re unfamiliar with the terminology, think of an Alexa Skill as similar to an app).

To explain how we went about this, it helps to have a general understanding of how Alexa works and where testing fits in:

Step 1: The Alexa-enabled device hears a “wake word” spoken by the user, and listens to the user’s request.

Step 2: The audio of that request is streamed from the device to the Alexa Server.

Step 3: The Alexa Server converts the audio to text and uses this to process the user’s intent.

Step 4: After processing, the Alexa Server sends the intent to a custom Alexa Skill, which is usually housed on a separate server.

Step 5: The Alexa Skill server processes that user request and determines how best to respond.

Step 6: This is where testing comes into play. As the Alexa Skill server is determining the best way to respond to the user’s request, your built-in testing tool triggers a control or challenger response. The Alexa Skill then responds to the request, sending the corresponding text response or visual media back to the Alexa Server.

Step 7: The Alexa Server then converts that text response to speech or renders whatever visual media was returned from the Skill.

Step 8: The Alexa Server sends that content to the device, which is then broadcasted back to the user.

For the purposes of this challenge, our developers built an Alexa Skill for a fictitious online book retailer, Happy Reads. Although testing can be integrated using any server-side testing tool, the team chose to build Optimizely into our custom Alexa Skill as it’s a popular tool among our clients.

So, what does this mean for the customer experience?  

Here’s how our scenario would play out, as designed by our development team:

You’re making a purchase at your favorite online book retailer, Happy Reads. You want to make sure you’re getting a good deal. As you’re browsing the Happy Reads website, you ask Alexa to find promotions by opening the Happy Reads skill and ask Alexa to find coupon codes.

In this A/B test, the control results in Alexa reading off multiple coupon codes at once. The challenger delivers only one coupon code at a time, with the option to search for more.

In this scenario, the testing team would identify the winning experience by having distinct coupon codes for both the control and the challenger and tracking the number of purchases using each coupon code (note: to keep the variables consistent, it’s important that each codes’ promotional value is the same).

Of course, this is just one means of implementing A/B testing in a voice-enabled environment. But there are many other opportunities within customer service, on-boarding, and in-app search experiences, as well as others.

And this doesn’t only apply to e-commerce. Banking and financial services, insurance, healthcare and media are just a few examples of industries looking to voice technologies to enhance their customer experience.

So long as humans can speak faster they can type, voice-enabled experiences present a powerful opportunity for brands to respond in real-time to customer requests and to offer suggestions, as well as an opportunity to position themselves as more of a service.

If you’re looking to implement experimentation within your voice-enabled experiences and other marketing channels, but don’t know where or how to start, contact us today

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Conversion Optimization Examples: Homepage Carousel vs None

Here are 3 conversion optimization examples of how to kill the “slider”. This is not a post about how carousels kill conversions.  They can, but it’s not about that. This post is about doing what’s best for the people who want to buy …

Here are 3 conversion optimization examples of how to kill the “slider”. This is not a post about how carousels kill conversions.  They can, but it’s not about that. This post is about doing what’s best for the people who want to buy from you on your site. Every CRO and savvy eCommerce manager I...

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Part 2: Our Top Takeaways from Click Summit 2018

Last week, we shared the first of many takeaways from Click Summit 2018, our annual conference for professionals in digital experimentation and personalization. This week, we’re back with more insights from each impactful conversation, inspired by this year’s edition of Clickaways. 1. Manage the three P’s of scaling your testing program: people, process, prioritization. Many companies […]

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Last week, we shared the first of many takeaways from Click Summit 2018, our annual conference for professionals in digital experimentation and personalization. This week, we’re back with more insights from each impactful conversation, inspired by this year’s edition of Clickaways.

1. Manage the three P’s of scaling your testing program: people, process, prioritization.

Many companies have found it more effective to establish a dedicated optimization team rather than having these duties dispersed across the organization. However, if that’s not possible for you, let your Center of Excellence take the lead on defining key processes, training and developing a maturity model to determine when each team is ready to start testing.

Develop a formal process for submitting, presenting, prioritizing and executing new testing ideas. Using various automation technologies can further simplify these steps.

Additionally, agree to one source of truth for your test results across multiple platforms. Companies that have various groups looking at different data sources struggle to establish the necessary credibility to scale their programs. This is one area where a knowledge platform that houses testing results, insights and ideas (like Brooks Bell’s Illuminate platform, or Optimizely’s Program Management) can help.

Finally, growing your experimentation program comes with the expectation of more tests, executed faster. When determining your velocity goals, be sure to consider quality over quantity. Always prioritize running a few, quality tests over many, low-impact tests.

2. Personalization and optimization teams should remain separate functions with connected but distinct goals.

Personalization is a worthwhile investment for any online industry, but it has to be adopted as a company-wide strategy in order to ensure you’re delivering a consistent customer experience.

To get the most out of your investment, establish a separate personalization team to run your program rather than looking to your existing experimentation team. Here are a few reasons for this: First, personalization is a longer-term strategy and “wins” occur at a much slower rate. Additionally, while there are similarities between A/B testing and personalization technologies, the questions you ask and the answers you get are very different.

Finally, running split tests is inherently easier and faster than implementing personalization. So long as your team is overseeing both functions, they’re likely to focus more on testing than personalization.

3. Focus on organizational outputs and customer insights, not just test outcomes.



Oftentimes, experimentation professionals find themselves nearest to the customer. Sure, you may not speak with them directly, but your work can have a direct effect on your customers’ experience and brand perception. That’s a lot of power, but also a lot of opportunity.

So here’s the challenge: Go beyond simple tests like button color or check out features and consider the bigger picture. Use testing to seek out insights that would be useful for other departments within your organization.

Here at Brooks Bell, we have our own framework for doing this (and we’d be happy to tell you about it). In lieu of our services, we’d encourage you to take a step back from test outcomes, spot trends and use these to develop testable customer theories.

Developing a customer theory requires you to conduct a deeper interpretation of your results–so don’t do it alone. Look to your working team to brainstorm customer theories and additional tests to validate or invalidate those. Bring in additional data sources like NPS, VOC or qualitative research to paint a more detailed picture of your customers.

Doing this can have huge implications for your customers, your experimentation program and your brand overall.

4. Build a program that strikes the perfect balance of innovation and ROI.

In order for creativity to flourish within your experimentation program, you have to establish clear goals. These are used as a framework within which your team can look for opportunities to innovate.

Develop a process for brainstorming test ideas that encourages participation and creative thinking, like using Post-It notes.



Finally, demonstrate a willingness to take calculated risks in order to make room for creativity in your optimization strategy. There is always something to be learned from negative or flat results.

Like the information in this post? Download this year’s Clickaways to access more tips, tricks and ideas from Click Summit 2018.

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Part 1: Our Top Takeaways from Click Summit 2018

Another year, another epically productive Click Summit. In the weeks since Click Summit 2018, we’ve spent some time reflecting on the event and even our heads are still reeling from the depth and quality of each conversation. This event isn’t your run-of-the-mill marketing conference. We strive to create an intimate and super-productive experience in our […]

The post Part 1: Our Top Takeaways from Click Summit 2018 appeared first on Brooks Bell.

Another year, another epically productive Click Summit. In the weeks since Click Summit 2018, we’ve spent some time reflecting on the event and even our heads are still reeling from the depth and quality of each conversation.

This event isn’t your run-of-the-mill marketing conference. We strive to create an intimate and super-productive experience in our small group conversations. Of course, the true credit goes to our attendees and moderators for their candid participation. It takes a certain level of vulnerability to look to others for feedback and direction. Those types of conversations are where the true insights come to light.

Had to sit out Click Summit this year? You’re in luck. We’ve compiled the key takeaways from each of the 22 thought-provoking conversations into an easy-to-read, downloadable resource.

Here’s our summary of some of the insights you’ll find in this year’s Clickaways

1. Relationships are key to creating buy-in for experimentation. Get to the right meetings and make the right connections. Target influential leaders to gain traction and credibility for your program. Build working partnerships with other teams, taking time to understand their goals. Work with them to make testing and personalization part of the solution.



Finally, know that proving people wrong doesn’t create buy-in. Rather, invite other departments to participate in your program and frame your tests as an opportunity to learn together. Hold monthly or bi-weekly meetings with direct and indirect stakeholders to review test wins, brainstorm new tests and discuss any resulting customer insights.

2. Instill testing in your company culture through establishing a credible team and program. Trust is easily lost, so you really need to take steps to ensure your team is positioned as a source of truth for the business, rather than one that’s encroaching on other departments. Your team should not only be experts in optimization and behavioral economics, but also experts in your customers–know their behaviors online, what motivates them and what truly makes them tick.

Hold training sessions on best practices for testing, personalization and customer insights. Regularly communicate test results and any subsequent insights to the entire company. And when sharing results, consider your audience. It may be worth creating different reporting formats for different stakeholders

3. If you want to build an army of optimization evangelists, you’ve gotta get everyone on the same page first. So long as end-to-end optimization requires working across multiple teams, it’s important that you establish clear processes and governance. Develop a common language for testing terminology; abandon jargon in favor of words that are easy to understand and don’t have multiple contexts.

Set clear rules of engagement and expectations between all teams involved in optimization. This includes engineering, IT, analytics, marketing, creative and others. Make sure communication and reporting processes are defined and any associated technologies are being used consistently.Finally, take into account how success is measured for all these other stakeholders. Not all teams are incentivized with revenue targets or conversion goals. Connect your test strategy to their objectives to ensure a unified vision.

Like the information in this post? Stay tuned for part two next week. Until then, download this year’s Clickaways to access more tips, tricks and ideas from Click Summit 2018.

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Do Online Reviews Really Matter?

Do online reviews really matter, and do they make a difference to your business? The answer is yes, they absolutely do. Consumers increasingly use reviews left by other consumers as part of their pre-purchase research efforts, and a bad review can have…

Do online reviews really matter, and do they make a difference to your business? The answer is yes, they absolutely do. Consumers increasingly use reviews left by other consumers as part of their pre-purchase research efforts, and a bad review can have serious effects on your sales. Herd shopping psychology plays an ever effect on...

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Who’s Hiring in May?

Interested in optimization, personalization and testing?  There are a variety of positions to choose from, whether you have coding experience or love analyzing everything in this world! Here are our picks: QA Engineer/Senior QA Engineer – American Express is looking for a “QA Engineer to work on mobile applications that will be used by tens of millions […]

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Interested in optimization, personalization and testing?  There are a variety of positions to choose from, whether you have coding experience or love analyzing everything in this world!

Here are our picks:

QA Engineer/Senior QA Engineer – American Express is looking for a “QA Engineer to work on mobile applications that will be used by tens of millions of cardholders around the world” in New York.

Manager of Testing and Optimization – Join GoDaddy’s teams in Kirkland, Washington or Tempe, Arizona in “translating performance and customer data into insights and ultimately business strategy, working with business teams to find data-driven optimization opportunities and being a driving force in developing a playbook for test driven business improvement.”

Ultra Mobile is looking for an a number of amazing people to join their ecommerce team in Costa Mesa California!
Ecommerce Analyst – Contribute to “ecommerce analysis and optimization efforts by finding and sharing insights in web data.”
Senior Software Engineer, Ecommerce – Looking for someone with front-end and back-end development skills to “contribute to software design and delivery for current and future products.”
Software Engineer, Ecommerce – Working in a dynamic start-up environment in front-end and back-end development.
CRO Developer – Seeking a candidate to “work within Ultra Mobile’s testing tool to develop winning customer experiences and tests that matches customer experience goals and provides a best-practice online experience.”

Software Developer, Experimentation Platform – Hulu’s Experimentation Services and Platform team is seeking a “Software Developer who will contribute to building internal products that enable and promote test driven product development” in Seattle, Washington.

Analyst, User Experience – UX Designer – MasterCard is “seeking a UX designer to join their Experience Design team” in New York. “Working with fellow designers, you’ll design, improve, and develop products and experiences for desktop and mobile devices.”

Digital & eCommerce Insights Manager – Join Autodesk in San Francisco as part of the Digital and eCommerce Analytics team, being “responsible for reporting, analytics and insights for the Digital and eCommerce (DEC) organization at Autodesk to help connect the dots across the various digital customer touch points.”

Web Personalization Manager – Help Bed, Bath & Beyond “drive their personalization efforts in the areas of product recommendations, content and offer personalization and be the subject matter expert for personalization on all company sites” in Union, New Jersey.

Have a job opening in the optimization space?  Get in touch and we’ll post it next month!

The Brooks Bell Team

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12 Conversion Optimization Tricks That Boost Cart Abandonment Results

Note: This is a guest article written by Brett Thoreson , the CEO at CartStack. Any and all opinions expressed in the post are Brett’s. When selling online, cart abandonment is a fact of ecommerce life. Humans have a limited attention span (just 8 seconds long), as we are filled with deliberation, choices, distractions, and doubts. However, […]

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Note: This is a guest article written by Brett Thoreson , the CEO at CartStack. Any and all opinions expressed in the post are Brett’s.

When selling online, cart abandonment is a fact of ecommerce life. Humans have a limited attention span (just 8 seconds long), as we are filled with deliberation, choices, distractions, and doubts. However, there are lots of tools out there to help you minimize cart abandonment, but we can’t eradicate it completely.

However, all is not lost. Customers who have abandoned their carts can still be reengaged. And we’re here to help you with top conversion rate optimization tips that will turn those faltering customers into paying ones.

cart abandonment solution in ecommerce

The Basics

Cart abandonment is when someone visits your website, adds items to their baskets, but for one reason or another, fails to finalize the purchase and leaves the transaction incomplete.

Conversion rate optimization (CRO) is a set of practices that helps you to convert visitors into paying customers and avoid, or turn around, cart abandonment.

Two impactful CRO practices that help with cart abandonment avoidance are:

  • Cart abandonment software: Software that tracks a visitor’s journey on your website to: capture emails and track shoppers while they are on your site, watch for them to abandon a cart, and email them following their abandonment, enticing them back.
  • A/B split testing: Running two versions of your website or page that are identical in intent (such as the checkout page) but different in style, allowing you to compare and contrast conversion rates between the two.

Power of Cart Abandonment Software and A/B Testing on Customer Conversions

Alone, these tools are impactful but together they can work in conjunction to produce much powerful results that will make your conversion rates soar and here’s how:

Cart abandonment software relies on shoppers (website visitors) entering their email addresses on your website form, while A/B testing provides you with the insight to optimize your website to ensure that shoppers (website visitors) input their email addresses.

Simply put, A/B testing converts visitors into leads and cart abandonment software converts leads into paying customers.

How to Use A/B Testing and Cart Abandonment Software to Get Email Addresses

There are lot of CRO tips for use when you are A/B testing to see what changes result in increased email conversions. We’ve put together our favorite tips here:

Where

Where you ask people for their email address, is hugely important and impactful. You can have a banner asking people to sign up. It can be part of a registration form, or you can use your cart abandonment software to produce exit intent pop-ups (displayed when visitors look as if they are about to leave). It is estimated that 35% of lost shoppers can be saved by using exit intent pop-ups, but test this for yourself to see if this is true for your customers.

Opt-In Changes

  1. Location

Visual tracking research shows that we browse websites following an F-shaped pattern, favoring the top and left-hand sides. Test your email address opt-ins at both these instances to see which captures more attention.

visual behaviour of visitors in e-commerce

  1. Color and Font

Choosing the right color and font optimization for your call-to-action button is imperative. We’ll discuss color in a little more detail below. Testing background colors and contrasting text that can make your banner stand out, easy to read, and compelling to complete is a significant use of split testing.

  1. Lead Magnets

Lead magnets offer your customers something valuable in exchange of their email addresses. It can be a downloadable guide on this season’s fashions or a report on the top-rated headphones of the year. Test whether lead magnets work or not; and if they do, test many types. Opt-ins of this nature can see up to a 10% conversion rate.

lead magnets as a solution for cart abandonment

Form-Based Changes

  1. Page Layout

As mentioned earlier, humans are easily distracted not only by outside sources but also by items on your website. For a particular VWO customer, removing the navigation menu resulted in a 100% increase in conversions. Try removing your navigation menu from the form page, to reduce distraction, and removing the option to leave the form, and see if these increase your conversions.

  1. Form Layout

Over 70% of online shoppers abandon their cart halfway through the checkout process, meaning that they are also halfway through filling out your form. Some cart abandonment software applications capture email addresses in real time, even if the visitor doesn’t hit Submit. Therefore, test moving the email address field higher up on your shopping cart and checkout pages, to capture the email address before the visitors abandon the page so that you can send them a follow-up email reminder.

  1. Copy

Words are powerful and emotive: They can make people comply, offer, or turn away. Consider how you are asking for shopper’s email addresses and then test different methods, such as explaining why, using personable language, emotive words, or by using less number of words.

pop ups to stop ecommerce abandonment

  1. Field Population

Do visitors respond better to form fields that are pre-populated with example text (such as example@example.com), blank fields, or fields compatible with Google Autocomplete. Understanding what makes your form easiest to complete should help  enable you to tailor it accordingly.

Exit Intent Pop-Up Changes

  1. Color

A pop-up needs to grab visitor attention, and the best way to do this is with color. Split test different colors that contrast with your website brand colors and “pop out.” You may also want take into account well-known color connotations, which differ across countries, cultures, and genders, such as:

Blue: Security

Purple: Luxury

Red: Urgency

Yellow: Caution

While you can’t adapt your website for everyone, you can adapt it to your customer base by seeing what works best for them.

  1. Offers

A great A/B testing idea can be of using different offers to see which offers appeal to your customers more. Research shows trends such as 90% of online shoppers being influenced by the cost of delivery and discount days such as Black Friday, leading to billions of dollars worth of online sales. Test percentage discounts, free delivery, and money off to see what works best for your target audience.

  1. Wording

Your exit intent pop-up wording is crucial. When issuing a pop-up window, you are walking a fine line between frustrating and enticing your customer. If you are interrupting them, test your wording to make sure it demonstrates a good reason.

  1. Fields

Another useful test for pop-up windows is to include the email address field in the exit intent pop-up itself.  This will enable you to capture user email addresses in real time before they exit the pop-up screen.

pop ups as a cart abandonment solution.

  1. Size

Size matters when designing your exit intent pop-up screen. Should it take up the whole page or just the center? Should it be easy to click or difficult?

Results

A/B split testing is a great way to increase your email address conversion rates. It can be then directly used to fuel your cart abandonment software, with the ultimate aim of re-engaging customers who have abandoned their shopping carts.

There are many other tests that you can try for capturing email addresses before cart abandonment occurs. However, the following 12 are our favorites, because they work. Increasing the number of email addresses you capture before cart abandonment and using these addresses in your follow-up cart abandonment email campaign, you can convert over 20% of lost online sales.

 

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E-commerce Abandonment Rates

There are few key performance indicators that everyone focuses on for an e-commerce store: conversion rates, average order value and the number of monthly visitors. These metrics translate into money…

Please click on the title to read the full artic…

There are few key performance indicators that everyone focuses on for an e-commerce store: conversion rates, average order value and the number of monthly visitors. These metrics translate into money...

Please click on the title to read the full article!