Court Ruling Strengthens Brands’ Mission Against Unauthorized Online Sellers

As a brand selling in an online marketplace, you may find yourself facing unauthorized sellers on the marketplace who are undercutting your price,… > Read More
The post Court Ruling Strengthens Brands’ Mission Against Unauthorized Online Sellers appe…

As a brand selling in an online marketplace, you may find yourself facing unauthorized sellers on the marketplace who are undercutting your price,... > Read More

The post Court Ruling Strengthens Brands’ Mission Against Unauthorized Online Sellers appeared first on Retail Performance Marketing Blog - CPC Strategy.

8 Affiliate Marketing Trends in 2019

As with any industry, trends in affiliate marketing are constantly in flux. And if you want to ensure you’re using your dollars wisely… > Read More
The post 8 Affiliate Marketing Trends in 2019 appeared first on Retail Performance Marketing Blog – CP…

As with any industry, trends in affiliate marketing are constantly in flux. And if you want to ensure you’re using your dollars wisely... > Read More

The post 8 Affiliate Marketing Trends in 2019 appeared first on Retail Performance Marketing Blog - CPC Strategy.

Perky Jerky: A Digitally Smart CPG Brand Beefing Up The Competition

Serial entrepreneur Brian Levin was on an assuming ski trip back in 2006 when a Red Bull spilled into his lunch bag —… > Read More
The post Perky Jerky: A Digitally Smart CPG Brand Beefing Up The Competition appeared first on Retail Performance…

Serial entrepreneur Brian Levin was on an assuming ski trip back in 2006 when a Red Bull spilled into his lunch bag —... > Read More

The post Perky Jerky: A Digitally Smart CPG Brand Beefing Up The Competition appeared first on Retail Performance Marketing Blog - CPC Strategy.

9 Examples of Good (and Bad) Ecommerce Product Pages

If you don’t think ecommerce product pages matter much to your business, consider this scenario: You’re shopping online for a new pair of shoes. The first ecommerce website you visit features multiple high-quality images, detailed specifications, custo…

ecommerce-product-pages-examples

If you don’t think ecommerce product pages matter much to your business, consider this scenario: You’re shopping online for a new pair of shoes. The first ecommerce website you visit features multiple high-quality images, detailed specifications, customer reviews, and even a video showing the shoes from multiple angles. The second website you visit features exactly one photo of the shoes, very little information about sizing and color options, and zero customer reviews. Which site are you more likely to purchase from? Obviously, the first one. The simple truth is that the design of your ecommerce product pages can be the...

The post 9 Examples of Good (and Bad) Ecommerce Product Pages appeared first on The Daily Egg.

The Expert’s Guide to A/B Testing During the Holiday Season

In 2016, online spending topped in-store shopping for the first time ever. That trend continued in 2017, with Adobe Digital Insights reporting that 2017 holiday sales surpassed $91.7 billion, marking 11% YoY growth. Peak season offers peak opportunities for experimentation programs. Increased traffic and conversion rates open the door for higher velocity, shorter durations, and lower minimum […]

The post The Expert’s Guide to A/B Testing During the Holiday Season appeared first on Brooks Bell.

In 2016, online spending topped in-store shopping for the first time ever. That trend continued in 2017, with Adobe Digital Insights reporting that 2017 holiday sales surpassed $91.7 billion, marking 11% YoY growth.

Peak season offers peak opportunities for experimentation programs. Increased traffic and conversion rates open the door for higher velocity, shorter durations, and lower minimum detectable lifts without compromising statistical significance.

If you haven’t already created your experimentation strategy, the time is now. But here are some essential factors to consider while creating your holiday testing game plan.

Maximize Your Holiday Window
Thanksgiving Day kicks off the peak holiday season, which continues through December 23. If you know your holiday window and website traffic patterns and expectations, you’ve got what it takes to take full advantage of this opportunity.

It can get complicated, but here’s a simple way to start:

  1. Define your holiday window. Consult past data to determine when traffic and conversion increases start and stop.
  2. Layer in the changes your organization is forecasting over last year. For example, one of our clients is expecting a five percent increase in traffic over last year’s holiday season. That intel is reflected in our traffic assumptions.
  3. Start your roadmap with the most valuable pages so that early wins can positively impact the rest of the holiday season. Create a punch list of pages with this in mind.
  4. Use traffic assumptions, desired statistical significance, and minimum detectable lift to determine the sample size and duration of tests.
  5. Continue this process to fill the window of time. Use these dates to mobilize your team, communicating key dates of test strategy kickoff, when tests will move into development, when they will launch and end and when results will be shared.

Communication is Critical
Since the holiday season represents a large portion of annual revenue, stress and emotions run high. As a result, it’s important to create your communication plan in advance. Determine who your stakeholders are, the optimal frequency of updates and what information needs to be shared. This isn’t the time for surprises or big reveals, so plan to devote a chunk of time to telling the story of your program and communicating its value.

The Weather Outside May Not Be the Only Freeze You’re Experiencing

Some organizations implement a freeze on development code updates and changes during the holiday season to avoid the risk of broken digital experiences or performance disruptions.  Get acclimated with your company’s approach so you can have a plan for implementing winning test programs.

The ideal scenario is to push winners immediately into production. Based on years of experience with enterprise clients, Brooks Bell strongly advocates this approach so you can maximize the impact of that winning test.

If production updates aren’t on the table because of a code freeze, don’t immediately jump to the decision to push the winner to 100 percent through your testing tool. Though it sounds like the best way to manage through code freezes, it could cause delays and create an undesirable experience. Before you make the decision how to handle, get your organization’s development experts involved to help you evaluate the risks and rewards.

Holiday Shoppers are Different
Think about your own shopping behaviors during the holidays compared to the rest of the year.

When I’m shopping during the holidays, I find myself on a mission to knock out my shopping list. As the countdown clock ticks away in my brain (and often literally on websites), I have a very real and intense sense of urgency. For me, customer confidence indicators, obvious savings and a clear and easy path to checkout are the ticket.

During the rest of the year, shopping is more leisurely for me and allows time for more browsing and consideration. I may even visit a website a few times before making a purchase. I zoom in on product details. I read customer reviews. I have more time, and the only restrictions are my own.

I’m the same person but have a very different mindset. The same goes for your customers. Keep this in mind as you develop your holiday testing roadmap.

Here are four tips to help ensure your holiday experimentation wins continue to add business value:

  • Keep it simple. As illustrated in my example above, successful holiday strategies are frequently based on a streamlined path to purchase, removing any friction and creating a sense of urgency and scarcity.
  • Test your hypotheses again after the holiday season. Do these experiences still produce a conversion lift when the holiday rush isn’t in full effect? If not, it’s okay! It’s an important learning you can use to build your Holiday/Non-Holiday playbook to make each holiday season better than the last.
  • Know your “Out of Stock” strategy. Regardless of what changes you make to your Product Detail page, nothing zaps excitement out of a customer experience faster than something being Out of Stock. Understand how your site handles Out of Stock messages, such as using red copy or suggesting alternate options. If it’s less than optimal, do some early testing to determine the most effective messaging. If your site includes a lot of Out of Stock product, it’s even more important to make sure it‘s been optimized.
  • Document your findings. Carve out time to tell the story of your testing through the chaos of increased velocity. The data and insights will be helpful after the rush and can greatly influence your future program success. Be sure to look at new, returning and loyal segments, and evaluate the differences in their holiday and non-holiday shopping behaviors.

For more intel on how to make the most of the merry months ahead, download our white paper, “5 Testing Tips for the Holidays.”

Need help developing a game plan for holiday testing? Contact us today!

The post The Expert’s Guide to A/B Testing During the Holiday Season appeared first on Brooks Bell.

Who’s Hiring in September?

Pumpkin spice is not the only thing in surplus this month, take a look at some job postings around experimentation and personalization. Here are our picks: Director, Digital Strategy – Universal Orlando is looking for a Director to “champion the consumer’s journey across channels to achieve business and campaign objectives and collaborates with leaders of […]

The post Who’s Hiring in September? appeared first on Brooks Bell.


Pumpkin spice is not the only thing in surplus this month, take a look at some job postings around experimentation and personalization.

Here are our picks:

Director, Digital Strategy – Universal Orlando is looking for a Director to “champion the consumer’s journey across channels to achieve business and campaign objectives and collaborates with leaders of non-digital channels to ideate and recommend campaign integration opportunities.”

Senior Web Experimentation Lead – The marketing experimentation team at esurance is looking for a leader to “embed an experimentation culture into the esurance DNA in San Francisco. This role will deliver increased cost savings, additional revenue and industry leading user experiences through the power of site testing technology and the scientific rigor of controlled experimentation.”

Senior User Experience & Small Business Project Manager –  Lenovo is seeking a candidate in Raleigh, NC to drive “UX projects to improve the online customer experience for Lenovo.com globally. The project manager will manage the identification, conception, definition, design, testing and implementation of UX projects with the goal of improving the customer experience, online engagement and purchase conversion.”

Manager of Digital Testing & Optimization, Analytics – Join the digital analytics and optimization team at L Brands in Reynoldsburg, Ohio and “lead digital testing and optimization efforts. This person will champion the advancement of testing and optimization capabilities and be viewed as the optimization evangelist for different brand partners.”

Digital Marketing Manager, Personalization – looking for an ambitious learner to lead a test & learn strategy through experimentation for our digital marketing channels. You will be the leader and subject matter expert of A/B testing with the goal of developing the strategy and approach on personalization.

E-Commerce & Digital Operations Manager – In New York, Zacharys Fine Wine is looking for a candidate to plan and execute “digital and website activities for retail including: content, merchandising, landing pages, site search, product recommendations, personalization, loyalty and other on-site conversion optimization tools.”

Sr. Integrated Marketing Manager – Web Analyst – Microsoft in Redmond, Washington is looking to fill a role to “work with the web lead to strategize, create, manage, execute and optimize web analytics. This includes building experimentation and personalization programs for Dynamics 365 and Power BI.”

Director, eCommerce – “Drive the strategy, development, implementation, and continued improvement of the eCommerce booking experience for Carnival Cruise Line” in Miami, Florida.  “Help lead the presentation across the eCommerce website and mobile app, supporting the integrated programs, promotions and initiatives across the organization.”

Sr Analyst A/B Testing & Site Optimization – Help “drive and support A/B and multivariate testing initiatives on the Homedepot.com site” in Atlanta, Georgia. “The Sr Analyst will be responsible for statistical design, analysis, and reporting aimed at the continued improvement of Homedepot.com onsite experience, with a focus on partnership for making data-driven decisions that drive improved conversion.”

User Experience (UX) Designer – Join the Brooks Bell’s UX team in Raleigh, North Carolina.  “The core function of this role is to research, concept, design, user test, and produce all files needed to execute A/B tests for our clients. This includes creating digital assets that are consistent with the development team’s standards and templates, as well as selecting images, designing layouts, and creating digital experiences that answer user issues outlined by our digital analytics and user research sessions.”

Trying to fill a position in testing and optimization? Send us your posting and we’ll include it on our next post!

The post Who’s Hiring in September? appeared first on Brooks Bell.

Don’t Make It Weird: 5 Tips for Balancing Privacy & Personalization

Imagine a simple scenario: Your coworkers are participating in a fun run for charity and want you to join. You’re up for it, but you know you need a decent pair of running shoes. The logical solution is to go online, search for information about running shoes and identify a few possible options. You could […]

The post Don’t Make It Weird: 5 Tips for Balancing Privacy & Personalization appeared first on Brooks Bell.

Imagine a simple scenario: Your coworkers are participating in a fun run for charity and want you to join. You’re up for it, but you know you need a decent pair of running shoes.

The logical solution is to go online, search for information about running shoes and identify a few possible options. You could order the shoes from an online retailer, but because proper fit is important for running shoes, you decide to visit a specialty retailer at the mall. A salesperson there is friendly and knowledgeable. The store has a pair of shoes you like, in your size. They’re a bit more expensive, but the fitting service added value and there’s no additional shipping cost, so you purchase the shoes on the spot. The next weekend, you run the race and the shoes feel great.

This illustrates a relatively traditional model of consumer decision-making. It begins with a spark that motivates a search for a product. It leads to a research phase, and a consideration set is developed. It then progresses to some type of product experience that narrows the consideration set. Ultimately, a purchase decision occurs and an evaluation of the final product is made.

But today’s online customers may notice a glaring omission from the process: It occurs a week after the run, when you visit a news website. There, in the right column of the page, is an ad for a pair of running shoes. The ad is tailored to your expressed preferences, but not personalized enough to know that a purchase has already occurred.

Seeing these ads, which follow us around the web, can be annoying, unnerving, and even potentially embarrassing. Because the targeting is so crude, it’s obvious that we’ve exchanged some degree of privacy for a marginal—in this case questionable—convenience. And, if this exchange has happened so frictionlessly with one online retailer, how often is it happening elsewhere?

If you can relate to this, you’re not alone. Research has found that consumers generally dislike targeted and personalized advertising. So if personalization makes customers uncomfortable, does this means brands should stop using tailored messages, offers and experiences?

The answer is, decisively, no.

Here’s why: the same body of literature that outlines a negative attitude towards personalization, also highlights the undeniable benefits of personalization. When an ad or message—such as an email subject line—is tailored, even superficially, there is almost always an increase in engagement with the subsequent content.

This contradiction is known as the “privacy paradox.” Consumers are willing to make a long-term trade of personal privacy in exchange for a short-term benefit or convenience, like more relevant advertising or a more specific shopping experience.

But while attitudes toward privacy may contradict behavior, they certainly shouldn’t be ignored. When an ad, message, or experience feels intrusive or creepy, it can diminish the effect personalization could have on your customer and their overall perception of your brand.

Luckily, there are many ways to deliver personalized experiences while also making your customers feel more at ease about their privacy. Here are our tips.

1. Be transparent

Numerous studies have found that the more transparently personalized content is presented, the more effective—and importantly, the more broadly effective—it is.

While making explicit references to data collection and sharing policies can increase privacy concerns, it can also diminish the effect the concern has on consumer behavior.

In an extreme example, Facebook somewhat-recently rolling out a new way for users to see their ad preferences, after the company’s advertisement platform and practices faced scrutiny following the 2016 Presidential Election.

But it doesn’t have to be that complicated. For instance, simply including ad security icons, for example, has been shown to increase the effectiveness of tailored ads even when the icon is unrecognized.

In addition, referencing privacy policies can diminish concerns over data sharing and personalization, even if consumers never read the policy. One study found that consumers interpret a privacy policy as a blank slate populated with all the usual safeguards. This means, of course, the burden is on your company to draft and enforce a responsible privacy policy whenever consumer data is being collected.

2. Be public about your data security efforts

Unsurprisingly, reassuring your customers of data security and describing the efforts you’re taking to protect their data can make them feel more at ease. But the effectiveness of this approach really depends on how much your customers trust your brand and your site. Building this relationship is difficult and can be easily destroyed.

But, if your brand has built a relationship of trust over time and is authentically dedicated to preserving this relationship, referencing the care you have taken to secure private information can not only be a boon to overall perceptions but increase the effectiveness of personalization.

3. Be personal to the right people, at the right time.

In marketing, timing is everything; and the same goes for personalization, it turns out. In e-commerce, personalization is most effective when your customer has established a consideration set and a final decision is about to be made. Additionally, as your customer engages more with a product category or brand, they begin to expect and look forward to a more targeted, relevant experience.  

4. Let newer customers opt-in to personalization

When it comes to moving customers toward a purchase, personalization is more effective in the “pull” direction than in the “push” direction. This means that you should implement personalization with more loyal customers and especially those who have requested more tailored experiences.

For new customers, we suggest waiting to provide personalization until a visitor has shown a specific interest in your company or product: they’ve viewed a few pages on a website, downloaded your app or signed up for your email newsletter. Once this happens, offer a dialog asking “Would you like a more personal shopping experience?”

While it’s true that many visitors may choose to continue on their own, others may not. This also gives you an early opportunity to show your brands’ interest in providing a relevant, convenient shopping experience, which may come into play later once they become loyal customers.

5. Let your customers run the show

Perhaps the most unsettling recommendation for balancing privacy and personalization is to give up some control over the degree of personalization consumers experience. Doing so evokes many of the tips we’ve already covered: it improves transparency, allows consumers to opt into personalization, and helps to build trust. Additionally, offering this service has been found to dramatically improve the effectiveness of personalization, even when some customers actually change settings beyond the default.

Personalization is a powerful tool. The effect personalized messages and experiences have on customers, however, is variable and possibly unpredictable. It’s important that companies balance concerns for privacy and general feelings of intrusion when delivering personalized experiences. Testing these approaches we’ve outlined above will help make your personalization efforts feel less creepy and ultimately, increase the effectiveness of the customer experience.


Transform your customer experience through personalization.

Brooks Bells’ Personalization Jumpstart Program uses a comprehensive, five-step process to help top brands incorporate personalization across their customer experience. Learn more today >> 

The post Don’t Make It Weird: 5 Tips for Balancing Privacy & Personalization appeared first on Brooks Bell.

Make Ex-Amazon Prime Members Your New Loyal Customers

In May, Amazon announced one of its most significant changes to ever impact Amazon customer service – a steep 20% increase to the annual fee for Amazon Prime members. Amazon began rolling out the increase to renewing Prime members on June 16th. Accordi…

In May, Amazon announced one of its most significant changes to ever impact Amazon customer service – a steep 20% increase to the annual fee for Amazon Prime members. Amazon began rolling out the increase to renewing Prime members on June 16th. According to a recent survey by Effective Spend, 54% of Prime members are...

The post Make Ex-Amazon Prime Members Your New Loyal Customers appeared first on Conversion Sciences.

Conversion Optimization Examples: Homepage Carousel vs None

Here are 3 conversion optimization examples of how to kill the “slider”. This is not a post about how carousels kill conversions.  They can, but it’s not about that. This post is about doing what’s best for the people who want to buy …

Here are 3 conversion optimization examples of how to kill the “slider”. This is not a post about how carousels kill conversions.  They can, but it’s not about that. This post is about doing what’s best for the people who want to buy from you on your site. Every CRO and savvy eCommerce manager I...

The post Conversion Optimization Examples: Homepage Carousel vs None appeared first on Conversion Sciences.

Do Online Reviews Really Matter?

Do online reviews really matter, and do they make a difference to your business? The answer is yes, they absolutely do. Consumers increasingly use reviews left by other consumers as part of their pre-purchase research efforts, and a bad review can have…

Do online reviews really matter, and do they make a difference to your business? The answer is yes, they absolutely do. Consumers increasingly use reviews left by other consumers as part of their pre-purchase research efforts, and a bad review can have serious effects on your sales. Herd shopping psychology plays an ever effect on...

The post Do Online Reviews Really Matter? appeared first on Conversion Sciences.