Bayesian A/B Testing: A Powerful Reasoning Model

A/B testing goes hand-in-hand with every marketer’s CRO strategy. Being a marketer or a CRO practitioner, you can’t underrate the value of embracing a culture of experimentation in your organization. Yet, finding an optimal variation to achieve higher conversions has remained a persistent challenge for online businesses throughout. In its classical form, A/B testing operates…

A/B testing goes hand-in-hand with every marketer’s CRO strategy. Being a marketer or a CRO practitioner, you can’t underrate the value of embracing a culture of experimentation in your organization. Yet, finding an optimal variation to achieve higher conversions has remained a persistent challenge for online businesses throughout.

In its classical form, A/B testing operates as a binary model—a null hypothesis that needs to be rejected to accept the alternative hypothesis. Owing to the complicated process of deriving insights from an experiment and taking crucial business decisions based on them, CRO practitioners have been adopting the more credible and intuitive model over the classical Frequentist one. It’s the Bayesian model.

The Bayesian model proves the evidence of the reasoning behind an experiment you run. In this blog post, we have explored the Bayesian model in detail, compared it with the classic Frequentist approach, and discussed its use cases.

What is the Bayesian approach?

Bayesian reasoning is fundamentally a belief-based approach with its foundation in Bayes’ theorem. The theorem presents a mathematical framework to update your existing beliefs with the influx of new information. 

Bayesian Ab Testing The Complete Guide

Here is an example for you. A doctor can diagnose a medical problem in a patient following either one of the approaches. As a Frequentist, he would have a fixed model set up against a patient’s specific symptoms for his diagnosis. He may probe the patient for them and identify the cause based on the fixed model he has in place. 

Contrarily, as a Bayesian, the doctor would still have a model. He would probe the patient for gauging his condition and identifying symptoms, and in addition, he would like to know the history of any past pains in the patient. Hence, his diagnosis will include the current symptoms and historical symptoms in identifying the actual cause. This approach will update his existing model with new information, which can lead to faster innovation with no extra cost, time, or energy spent in the process of diagnosis. 

An example from StackExchange makes this concept even simpler.  

Say you’ve misplaced your phone, and since this happens all the time, you have got yourself a phone locator. Your phone has an instrument attached to its base, which signals it to start beeping when you press a button on the phone locator. The problem is, from where should you begin your search in the house?

If you are a Frequentist, your built-in model would be identifying the area based on the direction of the sound of beeps. Thus, you will run after the beeps to find the device’s location in the house.

Yet, as a Bayesian, you would recall the locations where you found it the last time it went missing. Did you find it on the kitchen slab or buried under the laundry? You will have reasons behind putting the phone in those places. Apart from the sound of the beeps, recalling this information will act as a prior that can assist you in making an evidence-based decision. In this case, it will figure out where to begin the search.

The critical aspect of Bayesian thinking is that it enables you to explore the pre-existing beliefs (priors) during your research, and these beliefs get updated with evidence data resulting in new beliefs (posteriors). 

In the context of A/B testing, why is the Bayesian approach more beneficial than Frequentist?

You can hear a Frequentist, who does not like to talk about one-time events, murmuring—”Did I arrive at the truth correctly?”. On the contrary, a Bayesian, who cares more about updating opinion based on data than finding the ultimate truth, can be heard out loud declaring—”I don’t know what the truth is, but I believe my initial opinion would change now since I have a new piece of information with me!” Pretty confident? Well, yes!

We ran an A/B test using VWO to check if a banner appearing on the exit intent of visitors can increase lead generation on our blog. Looking at it through the Bayesian lens, we see a varying degree of confidence in all possible conversion rates in the graphical representation. We concluded that control (no banner) is the winner, and also, there has been an overlap in the conversion rate between 0.25% and 0.6%.

bayesian a/b testing
bayesian a/b testing

On the other hand, the Frequentist approach returned a p=0.042, also concluding that the control is the winner. 

The Frequentist approach is steadfast in reaching a significant number of visitors to return a p-value, which is hard to put in a business context. What can you discern with a p=0.042 here? It’s likely to leave you confused.

As a marketer or a growth leader, you would want your tool to do the heavy-lifting when it comes to statistics and give you results that help you make good business decisions. 

Bayesian provides a more sensible and intuitive way to optimize your CRO efforts. It updates your opinions backed by evidence when you deduce your prediction and induce the learning in the experiment cycle with a knowledge update, as shown in the image below.

bayesian learning cycle
Image source: Instagram

VWO SmartStats—the Bayesian way

VWO goes the Bayesian way with SmartStats, a Bayesian-powered statistics engine for A/B testing. This engine gives you intelligent results to make smarter business decisions and reduces your testing time. 

The Bayesian approach enables you to incorporate knowledge into your experiments iteratively. SmartStats catalyzes this approach using a non-informative prior where all conversion rate possibilities are equally likely. In addition, it ensures that you stay in control and can monitor the test as it progresses and reaches its significance over a period of time before it concludes. 

Blog Banner Bayesian Ab Testing

Let’s go back to the exit-intent banner example discussed in the blog. For the test, we observed that the distributions were wider initially. However, as shown below, you can figure out that they started to shrink with more data.
The probability to beat baseline during the start of the test was close to 50%, but as the test progressed, it reached 95% confidence after reaching 1000 visitors, declaring the control as the winner.

If you look at the progress of this experiment with respect to time and traffic, it looked like this with the lowest number of visitors, showing variation leading (non-significantly):

bayesian a/b testing

And, this with ~1000 visitors, variation dropping steeply and control expanding:

bayesian a/b testing

The final graph declaring control as the winner:

bayesian a/b testing

How does Bayesian A/B testing allow faster innovation?

With the ability to incorporate belief as part of the experiment, the Bayesian approach enables you to make faster decisions with lower experimentation costs as compared to a Frequentist approach.

It is common to use a Bayesian approach where running an experiment is costlier, and you don’t have enough data to make a decision, whether it is a medical diagnostics test to discern the probability of having cancer or the email being spam.

Also, the Bayesian approach allows you to feed a posterior of one experiment as prior to another. Therefore, an A/B testing tool based on this model enables you to consistently and quickly optimize your experiments for conversions. You do not have to learn new data from your experiment every single time, instead, feed the posterior (read: update) to a prior, iteratively, to significantly determine improvement with less data.

With the exit-intent banner experiment, extensively discussed in the blog, we took a quick decision looking at the progress of the test as soon as it reached its significance. We did so to mitigate the loss of the opportunity metric that was MQLs in this case. The test was concluded with an observation that an exit-intent banner doesn’t work on our blog. This observation can act as data-backed evidence (posterior) to be fed as a prior to our subsequent experiments around blogs.

So don’t wait. Take a plunge, fail fast, learn effectively, and grow exponentially with iterative A/B testing that promises opportunities for innovation in your business to witness astronomical conversions.

End Banner Bayesian Ab Testing The Complete Guide

How to Apply Design Thinking to CRO

The search for better conversion is often attributed to the marketing approach.  However, it is just as much an issue linked to user experience (UX). Indeed, if the good practices aiming at increasing conversions are known and numerous, there comes a stage where it is essential to know the users better. It is then a…

The search for better conversion is often attributed to the marketing approach. 

However, it is just as much an issue linked to user experience (UX). Indeed, if the good practices aiming at increasing conversions are known and numerous, there comes a stage where it is essential to know the users better. It is then a question of finely analyzing the customer/user journey, building personae… in a nutshell: applying user-centric methods. 

Design Thinking is both a method, a state of mind and a process. Its goal is to solve problems with a product or service in terms of user experience. It is a method that allows us to go deeper into understanding users, innovation, and design. 

Upstream, Design Thinking makes it possible to focus the design of a product on customers and users. This process represents a powerful asset for companies because it makes it possible to optimize the project on its target and maximize the chances of obtaining conclusive results.

This allows marketing teams, designers, developers, etc. to not rely on intuition but rather on human-centered research, reflection, and design.

Feature Image How To Apply Design Thinking To Cro

Conversion rate optimization (CRO) can be compared to the Design Thinking methods as its field is to set up a clear process to optimize the conversion rate of a website for very specific actions. This process is similar to that of Design Thinking in that it is also based on research, hypothesis, and testing.

Since markets, personas, and industries can be very complex at times, it’s impossible to know what improvements will optimize the conversion rate. As with Design Thinking, intuition and opinion don’t really have a place here. Considering that it is impossible to know what will work when it comes to conversion, innovation and testing are the main points to build on.

A common state of mind

The common mindset, therefore, is first of all to accept several truths:

The opinion does not count: Whether in Design Thinking or in CRO, subjective opinions do not really have their place here. It is impossible to put yourself in all users’ shoes and fully understand them at first glance. You have to put your intuition aside and focus on reliable data. Of course,  innovative ideas, opinions, suggestions can be offered, but they must come systematically from observations made and must then be tested.

It’s impossible to know what will work: Of course, there are some basic universal rules to improve performance, like loading speed or accessibility. But when it comes to CRO, it’s impossible to know in advance what will work. This is why the tests exist.

There is no such thing as a magical layout: No placement, no layout, no color is better for conversions. No universal rule exists to maximize the chances of optimizing conversions. The best practices that can be found all over the web work on some sites, but not on all sites. We must therefore stop thinking about “good practice” and instead think about “process”.

And that’s the huge common point between CRO and Design Thinking – both involve a very clear process: collecting data, finding solutions, making hypotheses, testing and analysis.

One way to make the most of data, rather than relying on opinions, is to use tools like VWO Testing and VWO Plan to build a knowledge base of learnings from completed tests. This way, you can really ensure your tests are impactful.

Understanding, empathy, and research

Whether in a process of Design Thinking or optimization of conversions, the first step is to empathize and put yourself in the shoes of the users.

It is important here to get to know the users in question with regard to their goals, fears, motivations, desires, demographics, geographies, etc.

Quantitative and qualitative data must therefore be collected in order to have the most advanced and precise understanding of users possible.

For the purpose of optimizing website conversions, the goal is to focus your UX research on the usability of the website and on the possible sticking points that can lower the conversion rate.

This research step can take into account several techniques:

  • Data analysis on Google Analytics: Quantitative data makes it possible to understand users and also the quality of the interface. It is possible to observe the most used browsers, the most frequent age group, or other demographic data. Regarding the interface, the bounce rate or the conversion rate on particular pages also allow a better understanding of the effectiveness of the website.
  • Polls / Surveys / Interviews: In terms of collecting qualitative data, the objective is to ask relevant questions directly to the users concerned. Whether it is through direct discussions with users or through online surveys, the goal is to obtain answers around possible improvements of the user experience.
  • Click/tap Tracking: Click tracking is also an effective method of understanding the habits and behavior of users in relation to the website interface. It captures the scroll and clicks of a group of users in order to establish heatmaps.
Blog Banner On Page Surveys

In any case, the ultimate goal here is to achieve empathy for users and understand as best as possible the different issues they are facing on your interface.

Define and analyze

Whether in a Design Thinking or CRO process, it is important to take stock of your qualitative and quantitative data in order to store and analyze it.

The goal here is therefore to start to understand the data and its impact on your conversion metrics. To do this, it may be interesting to bring together recurring user behaviors in personas, for example.

In this step, two questions concerning the data collected must be asked:

  • Is there a common problem faced by many different users?
  • Are there answers that come up often?

It is important here to sort the data and transform it into real observations which will help you to create hypotheses later.

This step therefore serves to clarify what to focus on to optimize the user experience and the conversion rate of the product in question. The goal is therefore to analyze the potential solutions and to choose those which will be the most coherent for the project.

Blog Banner VWO Insights

Ideation and hypothesis

In a Design Thinking process, ideation consists of generating innovative ideas in order to find solutions.

Brainstorming and group work are therefore favorable here. Each member of the team can share their ideas in order to create a debate and make intelligent hypotheses.

With all the qualitative and quantitative data collected before, the goal of this final step is to find hypotheses to be implemented in future tests.

The objective here is to generate as many hypotheses as possible.

Finally, it is best to organize and tidy all the assumptions made with a rating system according to the ease of implementation and the impact on the user experience.

The important thing is to prioritize the assumptions that have great potential in terms of optimizing the conversion rate. This will allow you not to focus on details that are not worth investing in.

How does it work in practice?

A great use case is the one of UNICEF Spain who wanted to ​​improve the donation funnel and avoid the abandonment of its users.

With the help of live recording tools, a number of problems were identified on some pages, and with this data, Making Science carried out different tests with users to discover what was wrong in the process. 

We discovered that a large number of users left the page in the first step due to usability issues and a process perceived as too long by the users. With this data, applying the user experience knowledge of the agency, and based on the results of the tests, it was decided to modify and reduce the funnel from 4 steps to 2, to see if this improved the percentage of user abandonment.

The result was an improvement of 86.3% of the conversion rate and 47.40% of the revenue.

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The necessary expertise

In a Design Thinking process, collaboration is essential. It makes it possible to call on several expertise necessary for research, design, and testing.

For the optimization of conversions, it’s the same thing. There are many aspects that must be mastered to develop conversions for a website.

Here are examples of roles that an effective Design Thinking team must contain to optimize conversions:

  • Data Analyst
  • Project manager
  • UX / UI Designer
  • UX Copywriter
  • Front developer

This also requires a mastery of many analysis and research tools such as Google Analytics, Tag Manager, VWO, and others: prototyping software like Figma or Sketch.

All these specialties are different and each have very specific objectives but they are complementary to optimizing the conversion rate.

CRO is often seen as an area reserved for large companies. However, Design Thinking, which is more popular, ultimately has the same objective as CRO: to generate and test innovative ideas in order to improve the user experience, the product or the conversion rate.

Design Thinking is therefore an ideal process for carrying out a CRO strategy. 

Web Push Notifications: Build Targeted Campaigns

Do bland, uninteresting, and spam-like push messages nag your users, resulting in poor click-throughs? Well, let’s accept the fact that generic messages are spammy as they don’t mean anything to the end-users, unless they are personalized. Poor messaging leads to poor CTR, lower conversions, and bad performance—a nightmare that hits all marketers alike. However, push…

Do bland, uninteresting, and spam-like push messages nag your users, resulting in poor click-throughs? Well, let’s accept the fact that generic messages are spammy as they don’t mean anything to the end-users, unless they are personalized. Poor messaging leads to poor CTR, lower conversions, and bad performance—a nightmare that hits all marketers alike.

However, push notifications are hard to ignore as they catch at least a moment’s chance to grab or lose your user’s attention. Well-tailored, personalized, relevant, and perfectly timed web push notifications are more likely to grab users’ attention on your website than their generic “buy now” or “subscribe now” counterparts. 

Web Push Notifications Build Targeted Campaigns

With granular segmentation and personalization of your push notifications, you take a step towards improving your average CTR with effective messaging as you invite users, let’s say, addressing them by their names, to your sales cycle.

What is segmentation?

Segmentation is grouping your heterogeneous user data based on user attributes, which we’ll discuss in the following sections. It is about making sense of your users’ data and establishing a solid data-backed marketing plan to achieve specific conversion goals that contribute to your business’s bottom line. In other words, segmentation is a connecting link between your analytical and marketing endeavors by pushing personalized messages to specific segmented user groups.

So, let’s dive in to know more about segmentation and how you can build targeted campaigns using push notifications to improve your conversion rates.

Types of web push notification segmentation

Segmentation allows you to create micro-conversion goals for specific user groups based on their on-site activity and behavior, such as reading a blog post, checking out a product on your eCommerce store, etc. This activity can be tracked in your analytics tool like Google Analytics, which allows you to create and discern when to push your message. This enables not only multiple micro-conversions contributing to the business goals but also nurtures your relationship with the users. Let’s look at the different types of segmentation groups:

Types of web push notification segmentation

Demographic

This segment includes user profile information such as their age, gender, location, nationality, device, etc. It plays a crucial role in gauging users’ purchasing intent and behavior. You can create targeted campaigns for your users based on demographic data. 

Social

Social data entails information about user qualifications, income, purchasing capacity, marital status, etc., for creating campaigns. For example, eCommerce companies often use segmented campaigns based on users’ wedding anniversaries for married users.

Geographic

This is pretty straightforward. User location can be utilized to target your website visitors in a specific country or region to target or retarget them.

Behavioral

Behavioral segmentation entails user behavior on your website. This includes their interest in specific products, how many times they have purchased from you, what they do in the sales journey, etc.

How does segmentation work for web push notifications?

Creating segmented campaigns is beneficial but super easy to increase conversions of your marketing campaigns centering on your user’s interests. Your push message can look like the one below if you segment your users based on their interests and behavior as a part of your targeted campaign. 

How does segmentation work for web push notifications?

VWO Engage allows you to slice and dice your website traffic to understand user behavior and enables you to visualize user activity on your website. It supports two types of segmentation, one for data collection called pre-segmentation and another for interpreting reports called post-segmentation. 

Pre-segmentation

To create the desired campaign, you can bucket your users into different segments, as discussed in the previous sections. For example, you may want to create a marketing campaign segment and test the push message conversions for US-based female users who browse your website on their iPhone devices from 8 pm to 1 am on weekends. 

Post-segmentation

This is an afterparty chore. When your campaign has been run and user data collected, you can dig down deeper to understand which segment interacted with your push messaging campaign. For example, you can create a report to gauge user engagement from Southeast Asia on desktop devices through the segments you created before running the campaign.

Blog Banner Web Push Notifications

Web push notification segmentation in VWO

VWO Engage allows you to create multiple segments on its dashboard. They are broadly based on subscriber properties, page visits, click events, geolocation, and JS/API cookie. 

Segmentation based on subscriber properties

The five types of subscriber properties that you can segment your users into are Operating System, platform, browser, user agent, location. You can also use custom dimensions to create personalized and targeted messages that are mapped to your users’ IDs.

Segmentation based on subscriber properties
Screenshot of VWO Engage segmentation dashboard
Segmentation based on subscriber properties
Screenshot of VWO Engage segmentation dashboard

Segmentation based on page visits

Analyze visitors’ behavior on your website to gauge their intent. You may categorize them on the basis of the actions they have performed while visiting your site. You can create multiple types of segmentation based on the URLs your users are visiting. 

Segmentation based on page visits
Screenshot of VWO Engage segmentation dashboard

LA Tourism utilized VWO Engage’s segmentation feature and reduced their bounce rate by 43%. They created buckets based on the category of pages visited by the website users, which helped them understand their users’ interests to effectively send targeted web push notifications.

Segmentation based on click events

You can segment your users based on click elements to understand where your users are actually clicking. In this segment, you can create subscriber groups based on elements such as CTA buttons, text, images, videos, etc., clicked on by your user.

Segmentation based on click events
Screenshot of VWO Engage segmentation dashboard

Segmentation based on geolocation

Geolocation segmentation makes your task easier by segmenting your audience based on specific countries, and even further by region. It’s easy to include or exclude any country or region, based on your business requirements. Start creating segments and trigger notifications according to your business time zone and region, just the way you want.

Segmentation based on JavaScript and API cookie

Functional and effective push notification tools like VWO give you the option of creating your own customized segmentation. With the help of a developing team, you can segment your subscribers based on the JS/ API variables in your code. Not just that, you can also manage it based on the Cookie key and value pair stored by your website on the user’s browser.

Impegio is a job hunting website based out in Italy. Primarily driven to generate leads and boost engagement on their website, they used VWO Engage’s audience segmentation feature, which resulted in 15% hike in their CTR. Start your 30-day free trial to make the best out of VWO Engage’s segmentation features and achieve skyrocketing conversions.

A/B test your web push notifications

With VWO Visual Editor, you can rigorously test your segmented push notifications campaign for conversions. You may optimize multiple elements, such as images, heading copy, emojis, etc to determine your users’ interests and devise further segmentation to pursue your conversion goal in a matter of a few clicks. A/B testing is an iterative process, so consistent experimentation can uplift the quality of your campaigns and also help you better your subsequent optimization efforts.

Conclusion

While generic push messages are akin to broadcasting media, segmentation brings a more focused approach to delivering a message relevant to a specific group based on their interest. This strategy for your marketing campaign lies in user behavior and personalization. In the era of hyper-personalization, make the best out of tools like push messages and invest in the smart way to get increased click rates and enhanced relationships with your customers.

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5 Tried-and-Tested Methods To Collect User Feedback With Surveys

Those days are over when companies used website surveys to react to negative feedback from unhappy customers. If you want to stand out as a brand in an increasingly competitive business, you need to go the extra mile in listening to each and every customer. With feedback becoming a new currency, you can’t stand aside….

Those days are over when companies used website surveys to react to negative feedback from unhappy customers. If you want to stand out as a brand in an increasingly competitive business, you need to go the extra mile in listening to each and every customer.

With feedback becoming a new currency, you can’t stand aside. Collecting feedback offers much more than just the knowledge of what your customers disliked and what you can do better. Website surveys can provide you with a way to approach your customers at the right moment and time.

They can help you learn the why behind your customers’ behavior and the reasons for which people choose your products and prefer them to your competitors. With this knowledge, you can better communicate your product advantages and work out a new value proposition. Also, analyzing feedback with website surveys can help identify conversion rate blockers, especially for eCommerce businesses.

Thanks to website surveys, you can learn about new market trends and demand for new features, product types, and understand how your customers’ needs change. This gives you an unprecedented opportunity to tip the market by adjusting your product to your client’s needs better and faster than your competitors.

However, running short rounds of website surveys from time to time is not enough to put yourself in your customers’ boots. Collecting feedback on a regular basis should become a part of your company’s culture. That’s where the feedback loop can help understand this better.

What is a feedback loop and how does it work?

The feedback loop focuses on the consistent collection of feedback and its implementation. This system suggests looking at feedback collection as a process rather than some activity.

That’s what the feedback loop looks like in practice.

Step 1. Ask for feedback – send your survey to a customer

Step 2. Collect feedback in one place – keep it in one tool and categorize for an easy reference in the future

Step 3. Analyze and plan – shape your product’s appearance based on what you’ve learned from customer surveys

Step 4. Implement adjust your product based on what customers said

Step 5. Notify inform your clients of the recent update or improvement in some area of your product. 

Start this process again.

customer feedback loop
Image source: UseResponse

In this article, we want to show you how to navigate the first two steps in the feedback loop. When reading this article, you will learn about the strategy behind organizing a website survey and also discover the tools necessary to execute the process in the right way.

1. Trigger on-page surveys at the right moment

Ask for feedback when your customers are more likely to respond instead of bombarding everyone on your email list. Some brands are still using the ‘spray-and-pray’ technique of sending online surveys – they usually use some newsletter template and send an email campaign to the entire list of subscribers. 

Low response rate, subscribers deleting or sending your email to spam are one of the outcomes for such traditional campaigns. Instead of proceeding with this scenario, you can choose a more targeted way to reach users who are ready to share some feedback. As a result, you would display your survey at the right moment, when a reader is more likely to take action.

Here are some of the triggers you can use to target users more effectively: 

  • landing page URL
  • new vs. returning visitors
  • browser
  • time spent on page
  • clicking a certain link
  • exit intent
  • pages in a session

Also, with tools such as VWO website surveys, you can combine different triggers. For example, you can choose to show a survey to returning web page visitors (condition 1), who viewed at least 3 pages on your website (condition 2). 

Action point. Brainstorm the scenarios for potential triggers you can use and match them with the goal of your survey. For example, if you are aiming to collect feedback on your new web page design, think of what type of customer can provide the most informative feedback. For example, this can be a user who scrolls down the page by at least 80% and stays on the page for at least 1 minute.

2. Conduct NPS surveys on your website

Asking for feedback in customer surveys at the wrong time and place is one of the reasons why you get almost no data to analyze while ending up with a low number of survey responses. When opening your NPS survey your clients can be busy, at work, or simply not receptive to emails, text messages, or calls.

NPS surveys are crucial for understanding how satisfied your clients are with your service and help identify the red flags for the customers who are about to churn. With this survey, you can also get feedback on what you can improve to serve customers better. 

Displaying your NPS survey on the website is one of many ways you can use customer surveys. Check out what an NPS survey can look like when embedded on your website.

vwo on-page surveys

You can trigger such surveys on the client portal, the place that only customers can access. Also, you can define when the survey should be displayed. For example, an Internet provider could show an NPS survey right after a user prolongs a subscription or pays a monthly bill through a client portal.
Action point. Check out these steps to create a survey and brainstorm the option on where you should be placing the survey once it is ready (think of specific pages that you can use as triggers).

3. Use single line text box in a website survey

In some situations, it is not sufficient to collect predefined responses from your website visitors or clients. Sometimes, a problem is too complex and you would want your customers to be honest with what doesn’t work with your business. Take customer support as an example. 

After your support agents have answered a customer’s question, there are a few ways you can proceed further. You can create a survey asking to rate a customer support agent and answer “Was it helpful?”

However, this response doesn’t give you a lot of context on your client’s perception of the customer support department. That’s why you can add an additional question for users who were not satisfied with the support using the single line text box in the website survey.

Later, by collecting and sharing this more in-depth feedback with your agents, you will be able to develop more proactive customer support. That’s because your customer support will be working more on dealing with challenges customers face and offering a better service even before a problem appears.

Here is an example of this survey question type.

survey
Image source: Twitter

4. Use QR codes in a thank-you message

Have you ever been invited for an online survey in exchange for getting an Amazon card? If you have ever taken up this challenge, you would most likely do it for the sake of getting some gifts, not because you were that interested in sharing your feedback. If you haven’t, then the incentive was not strong enough. 

In both cases, offering an incentive before a user fills out a survey is a bad idea. Users who participate in paid or incentivized surveys and are told to receive a gift after completion usually do their best to help and that doesn’t always mean being honest.

Instead of offering a gift in the beginning of the survey, make it a surprise for an engaged user who doesn’t need a present to share some feedback. Once they have invested some time in helping you improve your product, as a matter of gratitude you can offer some small discount, a promo code, or something else that your users would appreciate.

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For example, you can use a QR code generator to create a QR code which you can embed as an image in the thank-you screen of your website survey. So why not just paste a link leading to their reward? With a QR code, your coupon is automatically added to the checkout making it easier for a customer to redeem it.

QR Generator
Image source: QR Code Generator

In addition, with QR codes you can track what users are taking actions as it offers more advanced analytics.

5. Incentivize your partners to use website surveys

For some businesses, a company website is only one of many places to sell products. Brands that rely heavily on affiliate partners distribute their goods through a network of other websites. 

Often, this model of selling products also means losing control over how your brand is communicated and how products are delivered to an end customer. However, this doesn’t mean you have to ignore positive affiliate marketing trends and shift away from this marketing channel.

There is a way how website surveys can help you regain control when working with affiliate partners. So how can you convince your partners to make website surveys and collect feedback?

To involve other parties who are distributing your products, you need to create a solid incentive. That’s because implementing your survey can take up your partners’ and affiliates’ time they would otherwise dedicate to growing sales. 

They might not realize that getting their audience feedback has a direct impact on the sales volume and revenue and that’s what you need to communicate to them more often.

There are few things you affiliate partners can ask their website visitors. 

  • How clearly does your affiliate partner communicate your product?
  • Why is your product not attractive enough for people to buy?
  • Are there any issues with how the website functions (usability issues, speed)? 

Working closely with your partners doesn’t stop there. You should also consider checking how attractive your affiliate and partnership program is as well. By directing a survey to your partners (not clients), you can learn what blocks them from selling more of your products and work towards making your program more attractive.

Also, based on what answers your partners provide, you can prepare automated and personalized reports which would provide them with guidance on selling more.

Here are some questions you can consider asking your partners.

  1. Which marketing materials were most useful?
  2. How easy were marketing materials to find? 
  3. Are there any other marketing materials you would be interested in using?
Survey
Image source: Tapfiliate

Conclusion

Collecting feedback should not be a one-off activity, but an ongoing practice in your company. If you want to make your website surveys efficient and get more information from your customers, you need to be strategic in targeting, timing, and content of your surveys. 

Choosing the right tool for surveys is also crucial for your success. Consider choosing the one that gives you more options on targeting and embedding your surveys on the website – that will make achieving your goals with website surveys much easier.

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5 Advanced Methods to Maximize Conversion Rates Using Remarketing Strategies

Plainly put, remarketing is merely common sense packaged in glossy corporate-buzzword-speak: the good old, veritably humane art of subtly reminding someone of what you want.  Parents do it.  Teachers do it.  Spouses do it.  And so do companies.  Of the 100 users who land on, let’s say, your landing page, most won’t buy. That doesn’t…

Plainly put, remarketing is merely common sense packaged in glossy corporate-buzzword-speak: the good old, veritably humane art of subtly reminding someone of what you want. 

remarketing meaning

Parents do it. 

Teachers do it. 

Spouses do it. 

And so do companies. 

Of the 100 users who land on, let’s say, your landing page, most won’t buy. That doesn’t mean they’d never buy. And you could bridge the gap between today’s abandonment and tomorrow’s BUY NOW, by remarketing. 

What’s more, you could validate your remarketing ideas and strategies by A/B testing them and taking decisions based on data as opposed to guesswork. 

What is remarketing in digital marketing?

Have you ever clicked on an online ad (say one showing a camera or laptop) but not actually gone through the act of purchase?

Remarketing is the repeated use of prompts to get a customer to follow through on something they showed interest in.

The visitor would find the same ad popping up now and again on various websites, including social media platforms like YouTube and Facebook. 

What we just described was retargeting (using cookies to chase the customer across the net). Remarketing would use email as well as cookies. They both have the same goal but use slightly different routes.

However, the two terms are used interchangeably and mean suggesting to the customer time and again to complete the purchase. 

The importance of remarketing in digital marketing lies in the fact that someone already showed an interest in the product. It is much easier to convert their interest to sale rather than try the same with a completely random person. 

That is enough reason to convince 56% of companies to depend on remarketing for customer acquisition. 

Abandoned Cart Mail

Five essential remarketing strategies to adopt in 2021

1. User segmentation

Analysis of your marketing campaign would reveal three types of visitors who respond to the initial advertisement.

  • Bounce: They hit the landing page and make a u-turn. The time spent is minimum, often less than 20 seconds, and they do not visit any other page.
  • Browse: These users stay on your site for several minutes and view different pages. Often they focus on a variation of the product they saw in the advertisement: a different model or something else that your site’s search algorithm shows them. They might purchase in the future and are researching.
  • Abandon: These users begin the buying process and add the product to the shopping cart but midway through checkout quit the platform. They could be distracted or have second thoughts about spending at the last minute. 

The remarketing strategy created by Google Adwords experts has to be carefully differentiated for these groups.

The first group is the least interesting. They have little or no value and perhaps landed on your page by mistake. 

The second group is more plausible. Perhaps they found cheaper prices elsewhere or maybe need a slightly varied product. Informing them about more choices is the best approach.

The last set is vital. They liked the product and the price. 

With a little nudge, they can be converted into sales. Pursue them aggressively since with a small amount of persuasion they would complete the purchase. Maybe a discount is all that is necessary. With an average 70% abandoned carts rate, it is essential to resort to remarketing to increase sales. 

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2. Email remarketing

A crucial part of the remarketing process is the use of email for outreach. 

If a regular customer, whose email address is in the database, bounced off the website, he can be reached through email. Email applications such as MailChimp are invaluable in this regard. They have inbuilt tools that can track such activity and respond automatically.

What can you do through emails that are so unique? You have at your disposal at least a hundred words, often more, to convince the customer to visit you and complete the purchase.

An email is also a perfect way to throw in a customized offer. Someone who has purchased repeatedly in the past can be provided a hefty discount to entice them to spend more. Since they already know your quality of service, they are likely to accept if they feel they are getting a good deal.

3. Pixel remarketing

Cookies have for long been the accepted way for websites to track users. Comprising a line of code embedded inside the browser which reports back user activity to the server, it sends back information about the device and browsing session. 

A pixel is a special type of cookie. It is a tiny image. Google Adwords and Facebook are by far the most prolific users of tracking pixels.

Since usually a person is logged into these services 24×7 (at least on a smartphone) the pixel summons up the cookies as needed. 

Both Google and Facebook have a decent idea of the user profile (gender, location, type of content preferred, browsing habits, buying history), and use of a cookie alongside that makes for an unbeatable combination for highly effective remarketing campaigns.

One crucial benefit of pixel remarketing is that the strategy uses behavior-based algorithms that learn from past activity. The service already knows if the user accepts remarketing prompts or ignores them.

4. Google Display Network

GDN is a group of over 2 million sites where Google displays advertisements. These ads are either banner ads or short video clips, much like those that interrupt playback on YouTube.

GDN ads are persuasive and able to create a good impression. The most necessary element of online advertising is adequate space to convey a message and a banner advertisement serves that purpose admirably. 

To enable it, add the Google remarketing code into your website product pages and enable Adwords to show banners.

The use of well-placed tags tied to the Google Display Network is a sure-fire way to create conversions.

5. Target mobile users

Make it a point to reach out to those on mobile. 

Not only do mobile devices provide the bulk of internet searches but they are also used by younger consumers who can be persuaded more easily to make the purchase.

If you have a mobile app it is easier to target cart abandonment and other issues through push messages. Also, offers of exclusive discounts can be communicated without being intrusive.

Make app-specific purchases more lucrative than website-based purchases (Amazon does it regularly) and see your remarketing efforts hit a new high. 

Let the pros manage remarketing

The key to all the above is the successful management of Google Adwords and Facebook Business Manager.

Google controls your preferences through the Audience Manager. Google Ads offers filters that are complex and allow granular choices to be made. 

E.g. visitors of a page are classified into visitors of a page who also visited other pages, visitors of a page who did not visit other pages, visitors of a page during specific dates, visitors of a page with specific tags, etc. 

Similar changes can be made to Membership Duration (how long a customer would be retargeted), platforms (include or exclude YouTube or GDN). Every aspect of remarketing can be tailored to suit the specific business segment, size, and budget.

Facebook Business Manager is similar in its complexity. 

Besides, Facebook lets you target a specific age and gender (unlike Facebook, Google does not have access to age and gender).

A generic remarketing strategy without insight would not work at all. 

Because of this complexity, it is worthwhile to use a reputed digital marketing agency such as Uplers to manage your remarketing efforts.

They are affordable and take the burden off your shoulders. 

Having a professional team manage the remarketing and augment conversions while you focus on growing your product line and improving the after-sales service is the best way to grow your topline. 

Using VWO Engage for remarketing 

With VWO Engage you can send out push notifications for both desktop and mobile. You can craft effective messaging that is influenced by the behavior of your website visitors. For instance, you can develop onboarding campaigns for new users. You can also choose your target audience – whether its your entire subscriber base or a custom audience with specific behavioral properties and set up entry-exit triggers for the notifications. VWO Engage also offers in-depth reporting for each push notification campaign that you build. Take a 30day free trial to test it out yourself

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How Seattle Southside RTA Increased Visitor Guide Conversions

One of the most common challenges for a destination is accurately capturing a visitor’s intent to visit and ensuring that a personalized experience leads to both clicks and goal conversions. Visitor Guides, often referred to as Travel Planners, are an essential way to track intent to visit.   Like many other destinations, Seattle Southside Regional Tourism… Read More

The post How Seattle Southside RTA Increased Visitor Guide Conversions appeared first on Bound.

One of the most common challenges for a destination is accurately capturing a visitor’s intent to visit and ensuring that a personalized experience leads to both clicks and goal conversions. Visitor Guides, often referred to as Travel Planners, are an essential way to track intent to visit.  

Like many other destinations, Seattle Southside Regional Tourism Authority’s Travel Planner requests remain a critical goal in tracking website engagement.  In Fall 2019, the Seattle Southside RTA team saw a decrease in their Travel Planner request conversions, both year-over-year and quarter-over-quarter. Furthermore, the team found that the gap between their Targeted and Default audience increased, highlighting that this goal had become a more challenging conversion point for audiences.

With the intent of increasing Travel Planner conversions, the Seattle Southside RTA team decided to refresh their content with a seasonal focus on their imagery.  They first created two versions of Travel Planner content, both with gorgeous Fall scenery highlighting the region’s colorful season.  

Launching the content as an A/B test, the Seattle Southside RTA team was amazed at the increased engagement.  Within the first few weeks, this new content saw an 8% increase in Click Through Rates (CTRs) over their regular Travel Planner content.  Better yet, the team saw a 15% increase in Travel Planner conversions within the first month of the new content running.

Encouraged by this initial response, the team continued to run the seasonal content until the last few weeks of the year.  Quarter over quarter, the team saw a 26% increase in conversions, with a year-over-year increase of 43%!  Using the new Goal Dashboard, the Seattle Southside RTA team was able to further breakdown the conversion rate for each of the new content pieces allowing them to see that the new content pieces not only had higher CTRs, but also much higher conversion rates vs their original content. The team found a 79% increase in conversions for their Desktop content, as well as a 63% increase for their Mobile content.

Inspired by the results of their A/B test, Seattle Southside RTA plans on launching more tests for goal related content with seasonal imagery.  Knowing that the new Goal Dashboard allows for a deeper level of insight into their testing, the Seattle Southside RTA team is better equipped to deepen their visitor’s personalization journey to increase goal conversions and engagement.

Congratulations to Seattle Southside Regional Tourism Authority for a job well done!

 

Interested in increasing your conversions?  Personalization can help you get there.  We’d love to chat with you more about making it happen!

 

The post How Seattle Southside RTA Increased Visitor Guide Conversions appeared first on Bound.

A Well Balanced Content Personalization Diet: 3 New Years Resolutions to Increase Goal Conversions

Happy New Year, travel marketers! The beginning of January always brings its own kind of magic with resolutions and the opportunity to both reflect on the past year and look towards the next.  It’s also a time that, if I can be honest, is a little overwhelming with the pressure of setting life-changing goals. And… Read More

The post A Well Balanced Content Personalization Diet: <br/>3 New Years Resolutions to Increase Goal Conversions appeared first on Bound.

Happy New Year, travel marketers! The beginning of January always brings its own kind of magic with resolutions and the opportunity to both reflect on the past year and look towards the next.  It’s also a time that, if I can be honest, is a little overwhelming with the pressure of setting life-changing goals. And it’s not only personal goals! Working within the digital marketing space I feel that every other content piece is focused on “new year, new marketing strategy” resolutions that couldn’t be easier to implement – or so the articles read…

At Bound, we’re big believers in starting where you’re at, especially when it comes to personalization and your marketing strategy.  That’s why one of our resolutions this year is to focus on something that we know has an impact: optimizing our goal conversions

When it comes to our monthly content reports, few things give our Customer Success Managers more joy than seeing an increase in click through rates on goal related content pieces.  But as fun as these increases are to see, we are even more thrilled by increases in the goal conversions themselves. As we’ve become increasingly aware of the important relationship between clicks and conversions – and the very different stories each can highlight when they don’t align  – we’re excited to share our new Goal Dashboard and highlight three resolutions on increasing your conversions in 2020:

Read More (into your A/B tests):

When in doubt about your content, run an A/B Test!  While click through rates can certainly highlight your audience’s preferences for the imagery, copy or CTA, how do you account for the content’s impact on the actual conversion?  Within the new Goal Dashboard, you can now compare conversion rates against your campaigns, segments and pieces of content, allowing for a deeper level of insight. We recently took a closer look at an eNewsletter related A/B test we have been running with a DMO.  Month over month, we found that one content piece had consistently less clicks than the other. However, in comparing the conversion rates between the two pieces, we saw that the content piece with a lower CTR had a considerably higher conversion rate. This comparison helped us see the value of a content piece we might have otherwise removed and will help inform future A/B tests.

Exercise (your understanding of your Mobile and Desktop visitors differences):

As we’ve written about before, there are many things to take into consideration when creating content for your Desktop and Mobile visitors.  Goal conversions are no different, especially given that our Mobile visitors are often less likely to convert. Within the new Goal Dashboard, we can now dive into the conversion rates for our different segments across campaigns, allowing us to compare, for example, fly-ins served to desktop visitors and banners served to mobile audiences.  Layering in this insight can help us develop content best suited for each of our unique visitors groups.

Spend Less (time guessing how your content is performing):

Over the past few years, we’ve increasingly become fans of thoughtful “abandonment” content and the way these direct CTAs can increase conversions for visitors who have initiated, but not completed, a conversion goal.  While we often see this content with high CTRs, it can be challenging to determine how exactly this content contributes to the overall goal. Thankfully, our new Goal Dashboard takes the guesswork out of content creation and helps us see exactly which Abandonment content is best contributing to the goal. 

Our hope for your 2020 is that your conversion related content is directly increasing your goal conversions (leaving you with more time to increase engagement for your ad visitors!)   Knowing that goal conversions are a vital piece to understanding your visitors intent to travel, we’re excited that our new Goal Dashboard will bring new awareness and insight this year.  Cheers to you and your increased conversions!

Want to learn more about the Goal Dashboard or personalizing to increase your conversions?  We’d love to chat with you and hear all about your 2020 marketing resolutions!

The post A Well Balanced Content Personalization Diet: <br/>3 New Years Resolutions to Increase Goal Conversions appeared first on Bound.

How Denver Increased Engagement for Ad Visitors

With the launch of their “always on” regional “Reclaim the Weekend” ad campaign, VISIT DENVER faced the challenge of how to keep their main landing page relevant. The regional effort, which promotes visiting Denver for a long weekend, targets a wide variety of personas that change monthly. Instead of creating multiple new landing pages every… Read More

The post How Denver Increased Engagement for Ad Visitors appeared first on Bound.

With the launch of their “always on” regional “Reclaim the Weekend” ad campaign, VISIT DENVER faced the challenge of how to keep their main landing page relevant. The regional effort, which promotes visiting Denver for a long weekend, targets a wide variety of personas that change monthly. Instead of creating multiple new landing pages every month, VISIT DENVER used personalization with Bound to match the hero slideshow content to the appropriate persona.

VISIT DENVER developed and rolled out three waves of ad personalization within their first year with Bound:

Wave 1

The first step was to personalize the slideshow for visitors coming to the landing page directly from the ad. This involved not only showing the appropriate group of slides but also starting the slideshow with the content targeted to that persona. While these visitors only had a 4% increase in clicks specifically on their persona-targeted slides, overall page engagement was significantly increased. Compared to other visitors, the ad persona segments had a 53% increase in visit duration and a 45% decrease in bounce rate when entering the site through the Reclaim the Weekend landing page.

Wave 2

The second step was to use Bound’s Media Optimizer tool to personalize the slideshow for visitors who were exposed to the ad. The pixeling capabilities of Media Optimizer allowed Denver to target Reclaim page visitors who had seen, but hadn’t clicked on the ad, as well as visitors who came back to the site after their specific persona campaign ended. Not only did these pixeled visitors have great page engagement, but they also had a 100% increase in clickthrough rates on the slideshow and were 28% more likely to click specifically on the persona-targeted slides. With this information, Denver had the data needed to show that visitors were still interested in persona-specific content even if they had not clicked on the ad. 

Wave 3

The third step was to build on the learnings from the first two phases of personalization and launch a fly-in campaign. The fly-in targeted visitors exposed to the persona who had never clicked on the ad or otherwise reached the Reclaim page. Using the fly-in, Denver was able to successfully direct 2% of these visitors to the page and continued to increase website engagement. Visitors exposed to the persona fly-in had a further 23% increase in visit duration and 18% decrease in bounce rate.

By identifying visitor interests based on ads, even if those visitors never directly engaged with the ad, Denver has been able to increase views on their key ad landing page and continually increase their landing page engagement. This has increased overall site performance and has allowed Denver to optimize the experience for these high-value website visitors. 

Want to learn more about personalizing for your targeted ad visitors? 

The post How Denver Increased Engagement for Ad Visitors appeared first on Bound.

E-commerce Abandonment Rates

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There are few key performance indicators that everyone focuses on for an e-commerce store: conversion rates, average order value and the number of monthly visitors. These metrics translate into money...

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Bayesian vs Frequentist A/B Testing – What’s the Difference?

Bayesian versus Frequentist Statisticians: the war is real
Imagine that you wake up in the one morning and you don’t remember anything from your previous life. You’ve erased all memories from…

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Bayesian versus Frequentist Statisticians: the war is real Imagine that you wake up in the one morning and you don’t remember anything from your previous life. You’ve erased all memories from...

Please click on the title to read the full article!