TINT introduces solution to quickly build UGC-driven web experiences

The new Experience Builder is a no-coding-required platform for developing web pages centered on user generated content.

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The TINT Experience Builder.

TINT, a user generated content curation platform, has launched a new suite of tools that allow marketers to build UGC web experiences using the company’s automated UGC curation technology.

The “Experience Builder” platform includes eight different types of web “experiences” (or pages):

  • Landing Page
  • Live Counter
  • Launch Countdown
  • Contest
  • Sweepstakes
  • Tag-o-War (Allowing marketers to create a hashtag “battle” — pitting UGC from two different hashtags against each other)
  • Contributor App (A non-public webpage where influencers upload content that can be used in campaigns)
  • Interactive Polls

Using TINT’s content curation technology, marketers can build out UGC-focused web pages and have them included as part of their websites in a matter of minutes.

Why we should care

Last month, the IAB put together a committee to better understand the impact of UGC on branding and marketing efforts. UGC can offer brands an effective way to, “Organically connect with consumers in a world filled with overly commercial and often intrusive messages,” the group said.

Marketers often see the value that UGC brings to their brands, but the time and effort it takes to curate it can be problematic for marketing teams with limited budgets and resources. TINT’s Experience Builder offers a no-coding-required solution that allows marketers to launch a web experience built on UGC within minutes.

More on the news

  • TINT has also partnered with Hootsuite, integrating its social content curation platform with the Hootsuite’s social management tool.
  • Foxwood Casinos is among Experience Builder’s launch partners.
  • Launched in 2013, TINT’s social curation platform is used by a number of major brands including Nike, Verizon, Blue Apron and Marriott. It’s powered by Filestack.

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U.S. podcast ad revenue grew by 53% in 2018

The market totaled $479 million last year and is predicted to exceed $1 billion in 2021.

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U.S. advertisers spent an all-time high of $479 million on podcast ads in 2018, up 53% from $314 million the year prior, according to research by IAB and PwC. The report also predicts that domestic podcast marketplace revenues will double to over $1 billion by 2021.

Why we should care

Fifty-one percent of Americans over the age of 12 have listened to a podcast and 22% have listened in the past week. Seventy-eight percent of listeners say they don’t mind branded sponsorships. Combine that with audio-first technologies baked into smart speakers and cars and advertisers are realizing that podcasts are a marketing platform that is a constant companion to millions of potential customers.

The report also indicates that tracked direct response ads have declined from 73% of all podcast ads in 2016 to 51.6% last year. This decline coincides with the rise of branded content campaigns and brand awareness ads, suggesting that podcasts may be more efficient for campaigns that do not require tracking via a unique code or URL.

More from the report

  • More than half of all ad revenue came from D2C retailers (22%), financial service providers (21%) and B2B (14%) ad buyers.
  • Baked-in ads still accounted for the majority (51.2%) of podcast ads delivered in 2018, although dynamically inserted ads did grow to 48.8% from 41.7% in 2017.
  • Host-read ads are still preferred over pre-produced and supplied ads, making up nearly two-thirds of ad types.
  • Cost-per-thousand remained the dominant pricing model in 2018, with cost-per-acquisition becoming no longer significant.

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Airbnb’s new video strategy lets experience and branding drive profits

Airbnb is turning its eye towards developing original shows in an effort to create lasting relationships with travelers, Reuters reported last week. It seems like every company is getting into the media game these days, with the scope of projects limited only by their resources. But, by going all-in on video without a clear blueprint […]

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Airbnb is turning its eye towards developing original shows in an effort to create lasting relationships with travelers, Reuters reported last week.

It seems like every company is getting into the media game these days, with the scope of projects limited only by their resources. But, by going all-in on video without a clear blueprint or quantifiable expectations for what that content will do for the brand’s bottom line, is Airbnb just another startup with more money than sense?

The leap to creating shows and films may not be as big as it initially seems for the online rental property platform, and its success or failure may be a fascinating case study for ambitious content marketers across all industries.

Doubling down on content to drive business

“The more we put content out there, the more you’re going to bring people to the platform,” Chris Lehane, Airbnb’s senior vice president of global policy and communications, told Reuters.

The company is considering a variety of options, including streaming through its own app as well as through other video services.

“We’re very much in the R&D phase here,” Lehane said. “It’s not just limited to video. It could be audible. It could be physical.”

From a practical standpoint, unconventional marketing tactics could help set Airbnb apart from hotels and other online travel agencies. It could also generate interest for additional offerings such as restaurant reservations, transportation or community-led experiences that can all be booked through Airbnb’s platform.

airbnb experiences screenshot

Bookings through Airbnb now go well beyond rooms.

These add-ons, combined with its expansion into more traditional, high-end accommodations, have the potential to propagate the brand’s growth at a time when it’s facing regulatory pressures on its short-term rental business in multiple regions.

Airbnb’s content play is a long game

As with just about any content marketing strategy, there’s an emphasis on hard-to-quantify factors that could heavily influence customers’ perceptions and decisions.

Just under two years ago, Airbnb gambled that publishing its own branded magazine would bolster its travel lifestyle association. The circumstances back then mirror the present situation: an ambitious and costly content objective, limited experience with the format, and unpredictable outcomes in terms of revenue. Running a print publication isn’t suitable for every business, but it may have helped push its public perception beyond the confines of a booking app.

The nature of digital means it can have significantly broader reach than a custom magazine. Airbnb is betting that video content can inspire curiosity, convince viewers to plan trips in their heads, and then turn that daydreaming into real travel demand. A mix of vacation nostalgia and aspiration served up in video content can act as the foundation of the brand’s affinity with those feelings and long-term customer loyalty.

From curation to original video content

Airbnb launched its first YouTube video in October, 2010, and has steadily grown the channel to 172,000 subscribers by uploading over 500 videos in numerous languages and creating playlists like “Airbnb for Work” and “Not Yet Trending,” that are aimed at customers and hosts alike.

The company is testing the original video content waters with Gay Chorus Deep South, a feature-length documentary that will be premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival this week. It’s also working on a series entitled Home, which will be available on Apple’s upcoming TV Plus streaming service.

Airbnb’s forthcoming video offerings could be dismissed as just another branding effort — if there was a clear road map to return on investment. However, there’s not, and the company seems confident enough to experiment and committed to its audience enough to let experience drive profits (not the other way around).

Whether Airbnb’s gambit turns out to be a game changer or a total flop, it may just set a precedent for marketers, who stand to be emboldened by its successes or learn from its mistakes.

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Podcast ads projected to grow to 4.5% of global audio ad spending by 2022

Study reported that 78 percent of listeners say they don’t mind podcast ads.

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Podcast advertising spending is expected to double to $1.6 billion by 2022, according to a study by advertising research firm WARC. This figure accounts for 4.5 percent of global audio ad spending, up from 1.9 percent in 2018.

More stats. The study also found that:

  • 78 percent of listeners don’t mind branded sponsorships because they understand it supports the content.
  • Podcasts reach 62 million Americans (22 percent) weekly.
  • 41.7 percent of podcast ads are inserted dynamically, at the point of downloaded (instead of being pre-recorded).
  • 53 percent of listeners turn to YouTube to tune in.

Why we should care. Like advertising on other on-demand formats, podcasts are one way advertisers can reach a specific, engaged audience. If nearly four of five listeners don’t mind ads, this could be an even more effective way to connect with that audience.

As a podcast platform, YouTube may be overlooked: it doesn’t require users to log in or pre-download an episode and easily lends itself to subscriptions, social commenting and sharing. By providing a YouTube option for listeners, podcast producers and marketers can take advantage of these features, monetize with ads and make use of YouTube’s ad capabilities and analytics.

Despite the advantages and advancements (such as dynamic ad insertion), there are still trade-offs to consider before investing. Podcasts still lack real-time audience metrics – making it difficult to tell if ads are getting skipped over – and programmatic ad buying is almost non-existent.

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Measure Your Success

Business management consultant Peter Drucker is often attributed with the saying “you can’t manage what you can’t measure.” By this he meant that you don’t know whether you’re succeeding unless your goal is defined and tracked. When it comes to DMO websites there are six goals we see tracked more often than others. They are:… Read More

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Business management consultant Peter Drucker is often attributed with the saying “you can’t manage what you can’t measure.” By this he meant that you don’t know whether you’re succeeding unless your goal is defined and tracked.

When it comes to DMO websites there are six goals we see tracked more often than others. They are:

  • eNewsletter SignUp
  • Visitor Guide Download
  • Aggregate Bounce Rate
  • Aggregate Time On Site
  • Aggregate Goal Conversion Rate
  • Aggregate Pages Per Visit

Because it is the most commonly tracked, we covered eNewsletter Sign-up in more detail in this previous post. In this post, we’ll pull from our report State of Personalization for Destination Marketers, so you can see how you measure up to your peers.

In the below charts, the Non-Targeted numbers represent website visitors who were not served personalized content. If you are not serving personalized content, you should compare your own performance against this group.

If you are serving personalized content, you will be in the higher performing group and should compare your performance to that of the website visitors tracked under Targeted.

How does your website compare to your peers on these key metrics? Does this bring up questions about what you’re measuring and managing? A simple but well organized measurement strategy is critical to managing a successful website. If you have any questions about best practices, please feel free to contact the Bound team here, and we’ll be happy to chat.

If you would like to download the  Free Guide: State of Personalization 2018 Report from which we pulled these metrics, click here. In the report, you will learn how destination marketers like you are leveraging:

  •      Website personalization benchmark statistics
  •      Strategies for implementing personalization
  •      2018 trends in content and personalization
  •      Real case studies from successful destinations

Related Posts

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Images and Stories Inspire Us to Travel

Photo courtesy of Tupelo.net When you see an image of a beautiful location or hear a great story about a destination, your natural response is to want to experience it yourself. The first step in that experience is often looking at the pictures of other travelers and reading their thoughts, opinions and narratives of their… Read More

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Photo courtesy of Tupelo.net

When you see an image of a beautiful location or hear a great story about a destination, your natural response is to want to experience it yourself. The first step in that experience is often looking at the pictures of other travelers and reading their thoughts, opinions and narratives of their experiences. We respond strongly to this user generated content because we can relate to the creators and we can relate their experience to what ours could be like.

In our 2018 State of Personalization Report, we identify user generated content as a major driver in online engagement. That’s the difference we see between user generated content and advertiser or marketer generated content. Travelers trust other travelers over advertisers. According to a study by Elon University, 65% of consumers trust word of mouth on the Internet more than content produced by advertisers.

Incorporating user-generated content into your destination’s digital marketing campaigns is a great opportunity to include an undeniable level of authenticity. In the report, we look at how leveraging local audiences to create content creates three benefits:

  • Modern consumers are visual decision makers.
  • Real people don’t feel like an advertising campaign.
  • User generated content establishes credibility.

As part of a bigger initiative to turn all marketing directives from professional photos to user-generated images taken by real visitors, Bound customer, Tupelo Convention and Visitors Bureau, started their #MyTupelo campaign. While Elvis’ hometown draws crowds from far and wide, many visitors only come for one specific attraction — so the challenge for the marketing team at Tupelo CVB was to increase overnight/weekend stays. Tupelo realized that it could take its marketing goals and initiatives to another level with a strategy that involved leveraging their locals.

“With UGC it’s not just us telling you to use our hashtag; it’s us saying there’s another traveler who stood in the exact same spot you’re standing in right now, and telling their travel story with a level of authenticity we just can’t provide on our own,” said Will Crockett, Online Content Manager at Tupelo CVB.

San Francisco Travel Association launched their “I am San Francisco and You Are Always Welcome” campaign as part of an initiative to let international travelers know that all people are always welcome. The first phase addressed the visitor directly in a dedicated video and #AlwaysWelcome hashtag. Phase two involves a nine-feature campaign leveraging locals with the goal of showcasing San Francisco as a diverse and welcoming destination. Titled “I Am San Francisco,” it’s an online series sharing the stories of both natives of the city and those who came to visit and found a home.

“We wanted to tell stories that are real and authentically San Francisco,” President and CEO of SF Travel Association, Joe D’Alessandro said. “This is what San Francisco is all about–not just acknowledging diversity but celebrating and defending it around the world.”

User generated content is just one of the topics we cover in our annual report. You can download the Free Guide: State of Personalization 2018 Report to learn how destination marketers like you are leveraging:

  • Website personalization benchmark statistics
  • Strategies for implementing personalization
  • 2018 trends in content and personalization
  • Real case studies from successful destinations

Related Posts

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