Unlock multi-touch attribution with CRM campaign tracking

If you’re using a CRM to house leads then you likely have the campaign tracking tools for middle funnel activity even if you have an offline transaction point.

The post Unlock multi-touch attribution with CRM campaign tracking appeared first on Marketing Land.

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Image credit: www.Curata.com

Brands with an offline transaction point often struggle to measure the full customer journey from acquisition source through to revenue. Often times, if revenue can be attributed back to something, it’s to the marketing channel responsible for the lead. This measurement is usually implemented with either a first or last touch attribution model for channel attribution and completely leaves out the rest of the customer journey.

The missing visibility and measurement is post lead acquisition. Once a lead enters our systems, how do we measure the effectiveness of our campaigns and lead treatments? Even better, how do we attribute revenue to content pieces and treatments applied to that lead in-funnel?

The answer may be something we already have access to. If you’re using a CRM to house leads then you likely have the tools to track middle of funnel activity at your fingertips with Campaign Tracking.

What is campaign tracking?

Campaign tracking within a CRM is technically an entity or object that tracks a variety of information about an event, mailing, emailing, or other marketing initiatives. It’s basically a container that houses all of the components of a campaign across channels and treatments.
Leads and contacts can be members of one or more CRM campaigns allowing visibility into the effectiveness of both single and multiple campaign influence across all levels of our funnel from lead to cash.

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Image credit: www.Salesforce.com

What are the benefits of CRM campaign tracking?

Depending on the CRM and how it has been architected and implemented, campaign tracking provides a significantly deeper level of insights and measurement including the ability to

  • Tie marketing activities to our sales pipeline
  • Compare the effectiveness of different marketing initiatives and their influence on each other
  • Measure mid-funnel activities alongside marketing channel attribution
  • Measure the effectiveness of content post lead acquisition
  • Inform the sales team of historical marketing activities via the contact record
  • Roll-up similar lead sources into a single object
  • Connect online & offline activities
  • Enable holistic ROI reporting
  • Preserve data integrity & maintain hygiene
  • Enables multi-touch attribution modeling within your funnel

Attribution and CRM campaign tracking

Now that measurement is enabled at such a granular level in-funnel we can see marketing activity influence across the funnel from lead to customer. This is where attribution really gets complex! Similar to the first-touch, last-touch, multi-touch debates on marketing channel attribution. Now we have these same debates in-funnel when attributing back to campaigns within our CRM.

Do we give credit to the campaign that initially acquired the lead?

Do we give credit to the campaign the lead responded to before they converted to an opportunity?

Do we give credit to the campaign that influenced the lead right before they converted to a customer?

First-touch attribution model

First-touch is pretty self-explanatory. In this attribution model, all credit is given to the very first action taken by the user that created the lead record.

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Images credit: www.Curata.com

The first-touch attribution has its advantages, it’s super easy to implement. The lead is tagged using a custom field and that field rides on the record all the way through the funnel to closed won. However, this model leaves so much of the story out neglecting to consider all other interactions the user had or actions the user took beyond that initial entry into the database.

Last-touch attribution model

Last-touch attribution is the opposite of first-touch. Instead of giving all credit to the first action the user took, we’re giving it to the last step the user took. Also easy to implement by merely over-riding that custom field.

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Last-touch is fantastic for measuring the effectiveness of campaigns targeting the bottom of the funnel geared directly toward driving a purchase decision. However, if we only look at what ultimately turned into a sale, we really lack insights into what levers to pull to get them to that point and we are leaving a ton of opportunity on the table. We are also boxing ourselves into diminishing returns and expensive tactics and are unable to scale our marketing programs.

Multi-touch attribution model

Multi-touch models are more complex, recording all interactions and giving credit to all touch points in the journey. They provide the clearest picture of attribution and provide the most insights regarding what levers to pull across the funnel to improve velocity and efficiency of our marketing investments. To implement a multi-touch attribution model within your funnel you have to utilize CRM campaign tracking. This is the biggest benefit of the campaign tracking tools within your CRM.

CRM campaign tracking reports

Once campaign tracking is properly set up and working within your CRM and when used in conjunction with a clean and granular lead source strategy, CRM campaign tracking opens up rich and robust reporting options. Your data will tell a very different story!

Here are a few sample reports that can be generated when both campaign tracking and a clean and granular lead source strategy are applied within Salesforce.

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I’d love to hear how you are utilizing campaign tracking within your CRM and what kind of new insights you’ve been able to pull. My guess is that once you were able to get to this level of insights, marketing resources were moved around to concentrate on what you didn’t even know was working within your marketing program.

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Measure Your Success

Business management consultant Peter Drucker is often attributed with the saying “you can’t manage what you can’t measure.” By this he meant that you don’t know whether you’re succeeding unless your goal is defined and tracked. When it comes to DMO websites there are six goals we see tracked more often than others. They are:… Read More

The post Measure Your Success appeared first on Bound.

Business management consultant Peter Drucker is often attributed with the saying “you can’t manage what you can’t measure.” By this he meant that you don’t know whether you’re succeeding unless your goal is defined and tracked.

When it comes to DMO websites there are six goals we see tracked more often than others. They are:

  • eNewsletter SignUp
  • Visitor Guide Download
  • Aggregate Bounce Rate
  • Aggregate Time On Site
  • Aggregate Goal Conversion Rate
  • Aggregate Pages Per Visit

Because it is the most commonly tracked, we covered eNewsletter Sign-up in more detail in this previous post. In this post, we’ll pull from our report State of Personalization for Destination Marketers, so you can see how you measure up to your peers.

In the below charts, the Non-Targeted numbers represent website visitors who were not served personalized content. If you are not serving personalized content, you should compare your own performance against this group.

If you are serving personalized content, you will be in the higher performing group and should compare your performance to that of the website visitors tracked under Targeted.

How does your website compare to your peers on these key metrics? Does this bring up questions about what you’re measuring and managing? A simple but well organized measurement strategy is critical to managing a successful website. If you have any questions about best practices, please feel free to contact the Bound team here, and we’ll be happy to chat.

If you would like to download the  Free Guide: State of Personalization 2018 Report from which we pulled these metrics, click here. In the report, you will learn how destination marketers like you are leveraging:

  •      Website personalization benchmark statistics
  •      Strategies for implementing personalization
  •      2018 trends in content and personalization
  •      Real case studies from successful destinations

Related Posts

The post Measure Your Success appeared first on Bound.

How data visualizations enhance Executive decision making

Just as Michelangelo approached that giant block of Carrara marble and said, “I saw the angel in the marble and…Read blog postabout:How data visualizations enhance Executive decision making
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Just as Michelangelo approached that giant block of Carrara marble and said, “I saw the angel in the marble and...Read blog postabout:How data visualizations enhance Executive decision making

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Who’s Hiring in October?

 Here are our picks: A/B Testing & Personalization Analyst – Barnes and Noble is looking for a candidate in New York to “execute critical tests and personalization initiatives alongside business units such as merchandising, UX, creative, editorial and technology to ensure the most optimum experience for customers to drive greater conversions.” Analyst, eCommerce Intelligence – Join […]

The post Who’s Hiring in October? appeared first on Brooks Bell.


Here are our picks:

A/B Testing & Personalization Analyst – Barnes and Noble is looking for a candidate in New York to “execute critical tests and personalization initiatives alongside business units such as merchandising, UX, creative, editorial and technology to ensure the most optimum experience for customers to drive greater conversions.”

Analyst, eCommerce Intelligence – Join the Perrigo’s Allegan Mi Facility in Michigan to help drive account specific eCommerce Intelligence strategy development, implementation, and maintenance along with providing analytic support to eCommerce Marketing enabling them to develop best in class go to market strategies.

Senior Data Scientist, SEM – “Using data science techniques that include predictive modeling and machine learning,” TripAdvisor is looking for someone in Needham, Massachusetts to focus on “optimizing SEM campaigns in such areas as auction bid optimization, user-based targeting, remarketing and landing page optimization.”

Marketing Manager (Strategy & Analytics) – GrubHub is looking for a Manager in New York, to “support the Marketing Strategy and Analytics team by analyzing A/B tests, managing budget, building key-metric dashboards, overseeing ETL data pipelines, and analyzing trends.”

Marketing Personalization Manager – In Bolingbrook, Illinois Ulta Beauty is looking for Manager of Personalization Strategy to “develop strategies and tactics for leveraging the customer data collected through the loyalty program, Ultamate Rewards, to deliver personalized, relevant communications across all channels that foster long-term loyalty and drive enterprise sales.”

JavaScript Developer – Brooks Bell is looking for a front-end JavaScript Developer with experience in modern technologies like REACT, AngularJS and Backbone.  This role will work closely with the execution and consulting teams in Raleigh, North Carolina coding test variations on complex sites along with interacting directly with clients.

Personalization Manager – Rooms To Go is seeking a Personalization Manager in Atlanta, Georgia.  “This position develops and executes e-commerce personalization strategies based on real-time data in partnership with analytics, email, merchandising, content, other marketing teams and business units.”

Manager Digital Optimization – Mayo Clinic is looking for a candidate is Rochester, New York to be “responsible for developing, implementing and leading the Digital conversion rate optimization program with AB and MVT testing discipline, focused on data-driven continuous improvement of Mayo Clinic’s™ digital customer experience.

Data Analyst, Personalized Customer Experience – Join Bose Corporation in Framingham, Massachusetts as a member of the Personalized Customer Experience (PCE) program Insights for Action (IFA) team and collaborate with business and technical stakeholders to produce reports and dashboards to drive decision making.

Experience Center, Front End Developer, Senior Associate – PwC is looking for a Senior Associate to join their team in New York to help clients change customer behaviors through the experience journey from strategy to implementation bringing interactive tools in the form of mobile apps, websites, or other digital platforms.

 

Have a job posting within the testing space?  Send it to us and we’ll post it in next month’s blog!

 

The post Who’s Hiring in October? appeared first on Brooks Bell.

When it comes to campaign design and measurement, many sizes fit all

When you focus on tuning one campaign KPI, you inevitably affect the others. It’s an imperfect world where you must be aware of the tradeoffs you’re making.

The post When it comes to campaign design and measurement, many sizes fit all appeared first on Marketing Land.

Crafting the right digital strategy to hit your ultimate marketing goal is a balancing act. You need to vet platforms, allocate budget and determine appropriate campaign KPIs.

This last point is seemingly the easiest element of a campaign to settle upon. However, focusing on the wrong KPI or not understanding how various KPIs interact with each other may negatively impact campaign success.

In today’s advertising marketplace, where the tech-stack can provide innumerable campaign measures, digital marketers need to put extra care into fine-tuning their campaign KPIs to help ensure that the scale they need is not limited by the measures they put in place.

The ideal versus the reality

Wouldn’t it be perfect if every campaign could be tuned so it delivers 100 percent viewability, zero percent invalid traffic (IVT), 100 percent in-demo targeting -– and deliver in-full while hitting click-through rate (CTR), cost per acquisition (CPA), or video completion rate (VCR) goals?

Marketers, like everyone else, must operate in an imperfect world. There are tradeoffs –- and these tradeoffs might mean altering or changing the weight placed upon various campaign KPIs to help ensure success.

A one-size-fits-all approach to campaign design and measurement does not always work, and it certainly does not always work for a single advertiser under every condition at all times of the year.

As we move into the months where marketers are executing their Q4 strategies, this is especially important to consider. Most brands this time of year need scale to affect the buying habits of as many consumers as possible. More than ever, a finely-tuned advertising strategy with strategic campaign KPIs is necessary to help ensure the ultimate opportunity is not hindered by restrictive or competing measures.

Performance measures, whether an advertiser’s campaign KPIs or a supply partner’s benchmarks, are the currency by which we evaluate the efficacy of the advertiser/media partner relationship. Their critical importance to the relationship reinforces the need for careful measurement planning and design.

Advertisers should carefully balance strategic campaign performance measures such as acquisition, brand impact, and video completion with tactical delivery measures of viewability, brand safety, and in-demo performance. The balance struck between measures will vary for each advertiser and will likely be impacted by overall marketing objectives.

How to strike a balance

Striking a balance does not mean abandoning one measure -– such as viewability -– for the sake of another. Marketers should recognize, however, that there is interplay between measures. And that the focus on one measure may impact another.

Advertisers have the right to demand -– and media partners have the responsibility to provide –- a high-quality and effective advertising environment. As we head into Q4, it is important to review overall marketing objectives and how they translate to individual campaign KPIs. Adjust where necessary and work to understand how a focus on a specific KPI has the potential to either enhance or detract from another.

A poorly-designed program with conflicting KPIs may potentially limit your reach and hand customers over to a savvy competitor. Consider how the KPIs you focus on could impact the return on your media investment.

In the end, you want to use your media spend as efficiently as possible to scale your programs to engage as many potential customers as possible.

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Bring order to chaos: Wrangling data for actionable insights

How to bring an overwhelming amount of data under control and use the insights gained throughout your business.

The post Bring order to chaos: Wrangling data for actionable insights appeared first on Marketing Land.

Producing actionable insights is one of the most challenging issues that brands face today. Urgency is ever-present, pushing marketers and analysts to rush decisions. But urgency is only half of the problem. Making the situation more chaotic is the fact that we are simultaneously awash in waves of data from too many sources. Between the urgency to produce results combined with the massive sea of data, we are inundated us every time we wade in and then simply washed back to shore.

So where do we start? Transactional, engagement, or demographic data? Prospecting or retention? The inundation keeps pushing us back.

There are strategies to navigate the churn and turbidity, and remedy those issues. Sometimes we simply need to take a step back, narrow our focus, and even get a little ruthless.

Insights begin with goal-setting

First, we need leadership teams to get ruthless with what really matters. Analytics can’t chase the shiny object or rely on some utopian commerce breakthrough — if only we could find attribution in some rabbit-hole metric.

Think bigger. Get brutal with company and divisional goals.

Great goals have a couple of key characteristics in common. First, they’re specific — they have clear expectations and a path forward to measure and show success. Great goals also unify teams instead of dispersing them in different directions where everyone has a separate idea of how they can accomplish them.

To reach goals, every single person needs to be pulling the boat in the same direction. Great goals produce unity, which in turn helps to focus analytical firepower where it matters most. Remove the rest.

Where to start

The lowest hanging fruit is almost always customer retention. It’s the easiest behavior to shift; it has the most room to grow; it’s the most profitable. One way to understand the importance of retention is to ask this question: if a brand acquires a new customer, what does that matter if that brand can’t keep the customer engaged? Prospecting without first nailing down the current customer makes teams spin their wheels and waste energy.

Align your performance indicators

So, we have our goals narrowed down and all teams are working towards a common purpose.  The next step is to flawlessly align our performance indicators to those stringently selected goals. Again, narrow your focus and be strict with the fidelity of indicators to goals.  They should have either a clear cause-and-effect relationship or a very strong correlation to prove success.

Once we’ve identified those core components, we can simply let the rest of the data wash away.  It takes work up front, but that work will be rewarded with a strong path forward and will avoid data paralysis down the road. By deriving indicators naturally from a core set of goals, you organically narrow the data set, so we can focus on producing insights that drive change.

It’s easy to see how many brands can get stuck in the mud during this phase. There are so many temptations, so many paths to take that could work if only for one added piece that we don’t have in the model. But this is a faulty mindset and the effort will be wasted with little to show for all that added work. Put the blinders on and be strict.

Where to start

The answer is almost always transactional data, especially if we’ve felt the impact of overwhelming data paralysis. Stick to transactional indicators early. They’re reliable and strongly aligned to behavior. What shows customer sentiment better: a Facebook Like or purchasing items?

Measure, rinse, repeat

Lastly, all of that work is useless if we don’t have a measurement plan in place to prove success. If we can’t measure, it doesn’t matter.

The best approach is a rigorous test-and-learn strategy. Not only does it prove success, but it also provides actionable insights for the future to help build individual successes into larger groups of changes across channels and teams to drive and achieve goals.

Analytics teams can definitely get backed up, especially with A/B testing. Sometimes the waitlist is daunting. But there are two good options if that happens. First, consider an outside agency dedicated to helping us learn about the customer. An outside source can provide focus when things get too tight for internal teams to produce results.

The other option is to test historically. I can hear the gasps and guffaws of analytics teams, but we need to read the tea leaves however we can to produce results. That means pushing changes to market and measuring year-over-year data instead of one-off direct causations.  That option is better suited to areas where we already know best practices or have some data points to suggest the right decisions with high degrees of confidence.

Another reason it’s a viable option — and why analysts should love it — is that it frees up the testing schedule dramatically. So many tests don’t really need to be run in an A/B format; sometimes we have years of historical data or mountains of best-practice to influence our decision. In those instances, measurement is less of a read and more of a confirmation.

Bring order to chaos

These ideas may sound simple and, to a large degree, they are simple. They’re foundational. But without a foundation, how can we achieve our brand aspirations?

So many brands run before they can walk and they fall flat. To bring order to chaos, we need to start with the lowest common denominators to build on our learnings. Start small, grow big. Incrementally and soon, teams from every channel will have the learnings they need to act and provide the best experiences possible for both the brands and the customers.

The post Bring order to chaos: Wrangling data for actionable insights appeared first on Marketing Land.

Making Marketing Analytics Simple And Easy To Understand

Does the thought of marketing analytics make you cringe? Does it seem overwhelming and time consuming? Many business owners find analytics and reporting a cumbersome task and one they put off until absolutely necessary. If this is you, or you’d like some advanced tips on measuring data, this is the article for you. We look […]

The post Making Marketing Analytics Simple And Easy To Understand appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Making Marketing Analytics Simple And Easy To Understand

Does the thought of marketing analytics make you cringe? Does it seem overwhelming and time consuming?

Many business owners find analytics and reporting a cumbersome task and one they put off until absolutely necessary. If this is you, or you’d like some advanced tips on measuring data, this is the article for you.

We look at making marketing analytics simple and easy to understand so it’s something you want to do, not grudgingly have to do.

First, let’s define marketing analytics.

Marketing Analytics Is…

Marketers (and business owners) use marketing analytics to evaluate the success of their marketing initiatives.

These analytics make up the processes and technologies to measure their performance.

Bottom line – marketing analytics tell you if your marketing programs are working.

You want to gather your data from all of your marketing channels and consolidate it into one common view. From here, you can decide how to drive your future marketing efforts.

To increase your lead generation and ultimately your conversions, you’ve got to know how to interpret your data.

Many business owners think marketing analytics are best left to the experts. We’re here to tell you that you are the expert. No more worries about metrics. You can do it.

To create your report, you want to attend to these items first:

  • Ask yourself what you want to learn.
  • Find the report that answers that question.
  • Put it into your overall marketing analytics.
  • Include a balanced assortment of reports.
  • Assess your strategies.
  • Then, you can use your report to change or revise your marketing strategy.

Here’s how to make marketing analytics simple and easy to understand.

Take Little Bites

When gathering your data, you often have access to multiple metrics. In the beginning start small.

A good place to begin is with page views, conversions and visitor information.

You want to track the most important information first. After you get accustomed to analytics and reporting, you can dive deeper for more metrics.

Marketing experts put much of their emphasis tracking conversions. Why?

This is a much more accurate number for you to gauge your success. Conversions track actual customers doing something on your website, like signing up, downloading information or buying something.

Your conversion rate focuses on dollars and the value of your visitor.

Be the Master

The true analytics expert knows which metrics and data matter and which ones don’t matter so much.

The fact is you don’t need to track everything. It’s too hard to stay on top of it all.

For example, if you want to focus on lead generation, your most important data is page views and your opt-in rate.

Understand Your Data

It also helps to narrow your focus to the most relevant metrics so you know what data to capture.

Here are some areas to look at depending on your business:

Ecommerce businesses can look at conversion rate, total revenue, orders completed, average order value, drop off rate and where that happens and full on cart abandonment.

A business to business company might look at page visits, page views, conversion rate and leads generated.

A business to consumer company might focus on conversion rate, click-through rate and orders completed.

Remain Objective

It’s easy to selectively look at your data and search for things that confirm a hypothesis. You might have something in mind you want to confirm and find data that validates it, but that leads you to ignore all of the contrary information.

Don’t get caught up looking for metrics that confirm what you expect and disregard all other data.

Be objective and look at the data from multiple angles.

For example, many people think a high bounce rate is due to the fact that visitors didn’t like your page. But you have to ask these questions:

  • What is happening?
  • Why is it happening?

Your first instinct is to attribute a high bounce rate to people not liking your page. Yet, there are many other reasons your landing page may have a high bounce rate:

  • Your content is superb and meets the users’ needs, and you only have one call to action that people take and then “bounce” off.
  • The landing page was simply to collect an email address, thus they bounce when they were done.
  • Your page load time is too high.
  • Your page doesn’t meet users’ needs.
  • Users landed on your page from a Google Ad campaign, and your page didn’t match the ad.

The goal is to assess why you have a high bounce rate before arbitrarily deciding you have to redo your entire page.

Know the Value

You’ve probably searched Google for “What’s a good conversion rate?” That isn’t necessarily the same information for everyone.

You want to understand the value of your analytics for your industry. Don’t stack your business up to businesses in other industries because their “good” conversion rate may not be yours.

Your Google search should instead be for, “What’s a good conversion rate in my industry?” Once you’ve narrowed down the field, you really can compare rates.

Comparing to unlike industries sets you up for misplaced expectations.

Final Thoughts

Now that you know how to make marketing analytics simple and easy to understand, we want to leave you with a few more thoughts.

Take advantage of these advanced ways to break down your marketing into analytics you can understand.

If you don’t, you’ll end up with a bunch of marketing information cobbled together that has no relationship with one another.

To make the best decisions for your business, you have to take your entire marketing picture into account.

This means your social media insights, your Google analytics and your emails stats. It means taking a look at all of your marketing efforts in one place so you can decide how to proceed.

Use your marketing analytics to make sound business decisions and drive your future marketing. Use them to refine and test your lead generation to increase your profits.

Tie your marketing efforts to your leads to your bottom line, and you’ll quickly see what’s working and where you can improve.

So, say goodbye to marketing analysis paralysis. Use these advanced tips to make it work for your business.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by analyzing your marketing metrics? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

 With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

 If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Kazuend

 

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Average Session Duration- What is it and Why Bloggers Should Care

There are a lot of stats to look at when viewing Google Analytics and average session duration is one of them. This article will cover what is average session duration and why bloggers should care about it. Even if you’re not a blogger, you may want to read in on this. Average Session Duration –…

The post Average Session Duration- What is it and Why Bloggers Should Care appeared first on Diamond Website Conversion.

average-session-duration-200x200There are a lot of stats to look at when viewing Google Analytics and average session duration is one of them. This article will cover what is average session duration and why bloggers should care about it. Even if you’re not a blogger, you may want to read in on this.

Average Session Duration – What is it?

According to Google,

Average session duration is total duration of all sessions (in seconds) / number of sessions.

A single session is calculated from the first time someone views your page, to the last page view of that person. So, if someone enters your site and visits a few places, say 5, on it that takes them 10 minutes, then their session is 10 minutes, or 600 seconds. If their session is one page and only 30 seconds, then their total session is 30 seconds.

The average session duration is taking the total time of the session divided by the number of sessions during a specific date range.

Average Session Duration – Why Bloggers Should Care

Average session duration can be influenced by bounce rate, page views,and sessions, but for some, this could be a indicator of how much people like to stay on specific areas of your website. For bloggers, this allows them to know if an article has been well received.

Google loves long form content. This has been said over and over by many leaders in the SEO industry. However, Google also has suggested that content in a post be at least 300 words.

Well, 300 words doesn’t take long to read. If you’re a blogger that constantly published content that ranges around 300 words, you’re not really beefing up the potential of time that your readers are spending on your website. Often, the reader will skim through in under a minute, possibly comment, and then leave.

Rather than giving the reader a “wham bam thank you mam” experience, why not do some of the following to possibly increase the average session duration, and thusly your reader’s interest in remaining on your website:

  • Create a series of posts and interlink them. People who have an interest for the topic will click to each topic and stay on the site longer.
  • Always find ways to link to other relevant posts in your website. Whether it’s a specific term that you explain or some other relevant content, this gives the reader a possible option to be curious enough to click that link and read more.
  • Have cornerstone content that is lengthier and filled will several methods in which the reader can digest your content. Aside from long form text, don’t forget that you can add images, video and audio to expand upon your point. Cornerstone content is usually quite lengthy (more than 1500 words), and sometimes may even seem like it should be in an ebook.
  • Don’t forget to link to your services, encourage visitors to comment, or ask readers to subscribe to your newsletter. It’s your website, don’t be shy. All of these encourage some type of positive action that brings them to another place on your website.

Most bloggers will probably look more at their page views, but seriously, if you’re setting goals on individual pages, you may want to also focus on whether people are staying on those pages or going to the places you want them too.

Have you taken the time to look at your site or individual article’s average session duration?

The post Average Session Duration- What is it and Why Bloggers Should Care appeared first on Diamond Website Conversion.

How to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics

You can link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics? Why yes you can! In doing so, it allows you to integrate all the services of each into one big tool to measure the behavior of your site’s traffic. This allows you to dig deeper into how people are searching your website so you can see what…

The post How to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics appeared first on Diamond Website Conversion.

how-to-link-webmaster-tools-with-google-analytics-200x200You can link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics? Why yes you can! In doing so, it allows you to integrate all the services of each into one big tool to measure the behavior of your site’s traffic. This allows you to dig deeper into how people are searching your website so you can see what they are looking for the most. Aside from their capabilities, the great thing about having both of these tools are that they are absolutely free. The only thing you need to do in order to take advantage of them, are to sync them together.

This article will show you how to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics.

How to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analtyics

Before you can link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics, you need to sign up for a Google account. After you have a Google account, you need to sign up for Google Webmaster Tools and Google Analytics. You will need to submit your website to each of them and add their tracking code onto your website.

The best tool to add the tracking code from Google Analytics or get your site crawled by Google Webmaster Tools, especially for WordPress users, is to use Google Analytics for WordPress, and WordPress SEO by Yoast, both of which are handy plugins.

After you’ve installed the tracking codes, either manually, or using the recommended plugins if you’re a WordPress user, then you need to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics.

Step 1. You can link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics by going to the Google Analytics tab called Admin. After you’ve clicked to go to the Admin section, there are 3 columns. Look for the middle column that says Property. You want to click on the link that says All Properties. (Note: Right click on the image below to open in a new tab or window in order to see how you can navigate to where you need to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics.)

link-webmaster-tools-to-google-analytics

Step 2. On the All Properties page, if you scroll, you’ll see all sorts of Google properties listed. You will want to find the Google Webmaster Tools section.

webmaster-tools-all-property-page-in-google-analytics

Step 3. Fill out the form and hit save. On this page you’ll want to also decide if you want to enable features like Demographics and Interest Reports Advertiser Features, and In-Page Analytics.

The Demographics and Interest reports basically collect information on your visitors in regards to age, gender, and their interest. The Advertiser Features give you options not available in regular use of Google Analytics and give you the ability to remarket with the platform, as well as have DoubleClick integration, reporting on Demographics and Interests, and reports on Google Display Network Impression.

As a note, while in this step, please make sure that you’ve hooked your website up to Google Webmaster Tools. The website has to be verified or this will not work right. Click save when you’re done.

webmaster-tools-link-to-google-analytics

The process in how to link Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics doesn’t take long at all. If you’ve already hooked your website up with each Google property, then it’s pretty easy to do.

Have you linked your Webmaster Tools with Google Analytics?

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How Important are Pageviews for Bloggers?

If you’re a new blogger or have been around the block some, pageviews are really important. If you’re not paying attention to your website’s stats, then you’re missing out on a lot of things that could make you money. Money or any return on investment is important for a lot of bloggers, whether the blogger…

The post How Important are Pageviews for Bloggers? appeared first on Diamond Website Conversion.

how-important-are-pageviews-for-bloggers-200x200If you’re a new blogger or have been around the block some, pageviews are really important. If you’re not paying attention to your website’s stats, then you’re missing out on a lot of things that could make you money. Money or any return on investment is important for a lot of bloggers, whether the blogger is a professional or writing on a website as a hobby. In this article, we’ll cover how important are pageviews for bloggers.

How Important are Pageviews for Bloggers?

What is a Pageview?

In many web analytics platforms, pageviews is a statistic that is commonly measured. Simply, a pageview is how many times a page has been seen. Yes, it’s really that simple of a definition. There are some technical ones, and Google has one specifically defined for those that use the Google Analytics tracking code.

Pageviews as defined by Google Anayltics:

A pageview is defined as a view of a page on your site that is being tracked by the Analytics tracking code. If a user clicks reload after reaching the page, this is counted as an additional pageview. If a user navigates to a different page and then returns to the original page, a second pageview is recorded as well.

A Pageview is Just Another Number, Right?

It’s a number, but not just any number. Pageviews are a very important number to bloggers because it’s one of the statistics that bloggers need to give to potential advertisers that are interested in placing ads on their site. Advertisers aren’t going to pay you to put up an text link, banner ad, or sponsored post without knowing your website’s stats.

A lot of times, the more pageviews you have, the more you can ask of an advertiser. Usually the stat they want is your monthly count, however, a lot of web analytics systems can be broken down into daily and weekly amounts.

As a note, aside from the pageviews, knowing what the majority of the audience is (gender, age range, and location), and keywords are also important numbers to pass to advertisers. For every pageview you get, web analytics platforms like Google Analytics tracks these details for you! 🙂

Pageviews versus Unique Pageviews – What is that?

Other than making money, it also allows you to see the progress of your own website. In fact, aside from pageviews, you also get a number for unique pageviews too! Unique pageviews are when the page has been visited once by a user. For example, if you visit a website and go through 6 pages after visiting the home page, and then return back to the home page when done, that is 7 pageviews, and only 6 of them are unique.

In fact, in Google Analytics, this is measured as a stat, and this is a good indicator of figuring out why your users left your site when you know where they exited the site.

So, really, how important are pageviews for bloggers? If you’re looking at your stats for pageviews for the first time, then you’re looking at a lot of potential for the future.

Do you know your pageview stats? If so, are you using your pageview stats to your advantage?

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