Who’s Hiring in November?

Here are our picks: Sr. Analytics Manager – Experimentation – Ebates.com is looking for a “creative problem solver with a passion for delivering data-driven insight and has experience in leveraging Testing and Experimentation framework to improve customer experience” in San Francisco. Marketing Analyst- Growth Analytics – In Atlanta, Georgia, Pandora is looking for a candidate […]

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Here are our picks:

Sr. Analytics Manager – Experimentation – Ebates.com is looking for a “creative problem solver with a passion for delivering data-driven insight and has experience in leveraging Testing and Experimentation framework to improve customer experience” in San Francisco.

Marketing Analyst- Growth Analytics – In Atlanta, Georgia, Pandora is looking for a candidate to “assist the Marketing Analytics group’s analysis efforts around customer targeting, acquisition, and retention; campaign, audience and subscription forecasting, and KPI tracking as Marketing Analytics works in conjunction with broader Finance, Product, Engineering and Data Science teams.”

Product Manager, Data & Analytics – Join The Walt Disney Company in New York and lead the “analytics-related product development efforts.” “Provide strong input into data tech R&D and data-related critical initiatives, and work on the integration activities with Disney Streaming Services’ analytics technology partners.”

Marketing Analytics Analyst/Data Scientist – The Children’s Place is looking for an analyst to be “responsible for supporting the company’s efforts to create a strong and advanced analytics team focusing on our customer” in Secaucus, New Jersey.

Ecommerce Product Manager – Boxy Charm is looking for a candidate to join their team in Pembroke Pines, Florida to “work with stakeholders across the business to understand needs and build requirements to create and maintain a roadmap for transforming our customers’ experience.”

Executive Director, Chief Marketing Officer – Lenovo in Chicago is looking for a leader to “generate revenue by increasing sales through successful marketing for the entire organization, by driving global marketing and communication, advertising, Public Relations, digital and social media.”

If you are looking to fill a position, give us a shout and we’ll add it to the next careers blog post.

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Measure Your Success

Business management consultant Peter Drucker is often attributed with the saying “you can’t manage what you can’t measure.” By this he meant that you don’t know whether you’re succeeding unless your goal is defined and tracked. When it comes to DMO websites there are six goals we see tracked more often than others. They are:… Read More

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Business management consultant Peter Drucker is often attributed with the saying “you can’t manage what you can’t measure.” By this he meant that you don’t know whether you’re succeeding unless your goal is defined and tracked.

When it comes to DMO websites there are six goals we see tracked more often than others. They are:

  • eNewsletter SignUp
  • Visitor Guide Download
  • Aggregate Bounce Rate
  • Aggregate Time On Site
  • Aggregate Goal Conversion Rate
  • Aggregate Pages Per Visit

Because it is the most commonly tracked, we covered eNewsletter Sign-up in more detail in this previous post. In this post, we’ll pull from our report State of Personalization for Destination Marketers, so you can see how you measure up to your peers.

In the below charts, the Non-Targeted numbers represent website visitors who were not served personalized content. If you are not serving personalized content, you should compare your own performance against this group.

If you are serving personalized content, you will be in the higher performing group and should compare your performance to that of the website visitors tracked under Targeted.

How does your website compare to your peers on these key metrics? Does this bring up questions about what you’re measuring and managing? A simple but well organized measurement strategy is critical to managing a successful website. If you have any questions about best practices, please feel free to contact the Bound team here, and we’ll be happy to chat.

If you would like to download the  Free Guide: State of Personalization 2018 Report from which we pulled these metrics, click here. In the report, you will learn how destination marketers like you are leveraging:

  •      Website personalization benchmark statistics
  •      Strategies for implementing personalization
  •      2018 trends in content and personalization
  •      Real case studies from successful destinations

Related Posts

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How Important are Pageviews for Bloggers?

If you’re a new blogger or have been around the block some, pageviews are really important. If you’re not paying attention to your website’s stats, then you’re missing out on a lot of things that could make you money. Money or any return on investment is important for a lot of bloggers, whether the blogger…

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how-important-are-pageviews-for-bloggers-200x200If you’re a new blogger or have been around the block some, pageviews are really important. If you’re not paying attention to your website’s stats, then you’re missing out on a lot of things that could make you money. Money or any return on investment is important for a lot of bloggers, whether the blogger is a professional or writing on a website as a hobby. In this article, we’ll cover how important are pageviews for bloggers.

How Important are Pageviews for Bloggers?

What is a Pageview?

In many web analytics platforms, pageviews is a statistic that is commonly measured. Simply, a pageview is how many times a page has been seen. Yes, it’s really that simple of a definition. There are some technical ones, and Google has one specifically defined for those that use the Google Analytics tracking code.

Pageviews as defined by Google Anayltics:

A pageview is defined as a view of a page on your site that is being tracked by the Analytics tracking code. If a user clicks reload after reaching the page, this is counted as an additional pageview. If a user navigates to a different page and then returns to the original page, a second pageview is recorded as well.

A Pageview is Just Another Number, Right?

It’s a number, but not just any number. Pageviews are a very important number to bloggers because it’s one of the statistics that bloggers need to give to potential advertisers that are interested in placing ads on their site. Advertisers aren’t going to pay you to put up an text link, banner ad, or sponsored post without knowing your website’s stats.

A lot of times, the more pageviews you have, the more you can ask of an advertiser. Usually the stat they want is your monthly count, however, a lot of web analytics systems can be broken down into daily and weekly amounts.

As a note, aside from the pageviews, knowing what the majority of the audience is (gender, age range, and location), and keywords are also important numbers to pass to advertisers. For every pageview you get, web analytics platforms like Google Analytics tracks these details for you! 🙂

Pageviews versus Unique Pageviews – What is that?

Other than making money, it also allows you to see the progress of your own website. In fact, aside from pageviews, you also get a number for unique pageviews too! Unique pageviews are when the page has been visited once by a user. For example, if you visit a website and go through 6 pages after visiting the home page, and then return back to the home page when done, that is 7 pageviews, and only 6 of them are unique.

In fact, in Google Analytics, this is measured as a stat, and this is a good indicator of figuring out why your users left your site when you know where they exited the site.

So, really, how important are pageviews for bloggers? If you’re looking at your stats for pageviews for the first time, then you’re looking at a lot of potential for the future.

Do you know your pageview stats? If so, are you using your pageview stats to your advantage?

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Google Analytics: How to Set Up a Simple Goal

Google Analytics provides a great feature for website owners to be able to track specific campaigns, also called a goal. It can be places on pages, forms, or anything you are wanting to track for to see if a campaign has an effective website conversion. It also tracks how the visitor arrived to the area…

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google-analytics-thumbnailGoogle Analytics provides a great feature for website owners to be able to track specific campaigns, also called a goal. It can be places on pages, forms, or anything you are wanting to track for to see if a campaign has an effective website conversion. It also tracks how the visitor arrived to the area you want to convert.

This works great after you’ve tried A/B Testing so you can verify the results from live traffic. In this article, you’ll learn how to set up a simple goal in Google Analytics.

Google Analytics: How to Set Up a Simple Goal

Please note, if you haven’t added your site to Google Analytics, then you can’t take advantage of the goal tool until you do. Aside from adding your site to Google Analytics, you will also need to apply the generated tracking code to your website.

The first step is in creating a simple goal is by clicking on your site in the Google Analytics dashboard. On the right hand side, scroll down to the area called Conversions. If you click on it, the area will expand and show you other links. Look for the area called overview as shown below.

googleanalytics-goals-screenshot-1

Now, you can either do this and be led to set up a simple goal or you can also click the Admin tab at the top. Image is below. In order to view the image larger and much better, you will have to right click on the image to open it in a new tab or window.

googleanalytics-goals-screenshot-2

On the last column under View, is an area called Goals. You’ll click that and be led to the page that has an area much like the image below.

googleanalytics-goals-screenshot-3

Click on the red button to create a goal. Once you have, you will need to name your goal and tell it hat type of tracking you want. In the case of this tutorial, and it being how to set up a simple goal, we’ll choose the first option called Destination. This is great for contact forms or lead generation forms. Once you have selected the option on how you want to track your goal, then click the blue button that says Next Step. See the example image below to see how you should proceed.

googleanalytics-goals-screenshot-4

In the next step, you tell it what page you are wanting to land on. You do not put the full URL. See the image below for how this step should go.

googleanalytics-goals-screenshot-5

Before hitting the blue button that says Create Goal, make sure to click the link that says Verify this Goal. This helps to make sure that your goal will work and checks it against your previous 7 days of stats on Google Analytics. In the case that you just joined and don’t have 7 days of stats, then proceed by clicking the button to create the goal. You can always check after a few days if the goal is actually working.

Once this has been set up, you won’t have to mess with it any more. You can just sit back and analyze how your goal is doing. Simple, right? There are other ways you can set up a goal in Google Analytics, like how long visitors are staying on your site (called Destination), by how many pages visits (Pages/Screens per Visit), or Event (like from watching a video.)

Have you taken advantage of setting up a goal in Google Analytics? Did you find it easy?

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What Do You Do After You First Apply Google Anayltics to Your Website?

When you get into creating and managing a website, at some point you’re going to hear about Google Analytics, especially being told you need to have it on your website. Regardless if you’re a blogger, a small business owner, or a big corporate business, you do need a tool to measure your site’s progress. Google…

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google-analytics-thumbnailWhen you get into creating and managing a website, at some point you’re going to hear about Google Analytics, especially being told you need to have it on your website. Regardless if you’re a blogger, a small business owner, or a big corporate business, you do need a tool to measure your site’s progress. Google Analytics just happens to be a good one that is also free to use.

So…

What Do You Do After You First Apply Google Anayltics to Your Website?

The majority of users may look in on their stats once a day or once a week. Google Analytics provides quite a bit of statistics. You can even set campaigns to analyze traffic from your website and some of your social network handles.

It’s quite alright to take a frequent look at your stats, but if you’re just looking at them and wishing your traffic to improve, then you’re missing out on what Google Analytics can do for you. It takes analyzing what’s going on and planning a campaign to drive attention to those areas of your website that you want people to see.

The great thing about most stats programs, including Google Analytics is that they provide exactly what information you need to know about your visitors. You can even find out if you’re targeting the correct audience, and at what times they hit your website.

Once you’ve installed Google Analytics on your website, you should let it do it’s job in collecting information. After about 3 weeks to a month, you should have a nice tentative spread of your website’s traffic.

When installing Google analytics to your website for the first time, some of the most important stats you should look at are:

  • Pageviews
  • Percentage of new visitors
  • Percentage of returning visitors
  • Bounce rate
  • How you are acquiring your visitors (where are they coming from)
  • Keywords

While there are a TON of other stats, your first time through should be to gather this information and start to put together a first campaign.

Your keywords, acquisition, and your bounce rate with each campaign you plan will change in time depending on how you adjust your website conversion plan.

Keywords

Before you even look at your stats, you really should already have a list of keywords that you’ve been wanting to work on for your website. If your analytics in Google are not coinciding with your intended list, then you’ve got homework to do in creating content around those keywords. Don’t worry, some people have websites for a few years before realizing that they’ve been missing out on capitalizing on being more laser focused on their keyword strategy.

Acquisition

If your website is brand new, you might not have too much information on how you’ve been acquiring your visitors. You will have a small idea, and can use those stats to either focus on those places that are sending you traffic, or working on trying to get traffic from new sources. It might take making sure your website is properly listed on search engines, creating social network handles, and sharing your content.

Bounce Rate

Bounce rate gives you a percentage of how many of your website visitors are only viewing one of your pages, and then leaving. Your bounce rate should never be high. In fact, your strategy should be in converting those visitors to fill out your lead forms, buy your product, share and comment on your blog posts, or even subscribe to your newsletter.

If you can put a plan together that gives you a low bounce rate, great acquisition sources, and above all, making a return on investment, you’re on the right path to great website conversion. The great thing is that Google Analytics is free to use… so what are you waiting for? Go forth and find out how your website is performing!

Do you use Google Analytics in your website conversion strategy? Do you still struggle with deciphering those stats and putting a plan together? If not, what advice do you have for newbies just hooking their website’s up to Google Analytics?

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