Universal Analytics: Now out of beta!

We’ve been talking about Universal Analytics for a long time – over a year. In that time Universal has always been in beta because it was not 100% compatible with the existing version of GA. Sure, various parts of the Universal platform have rolled out, like the Measurement Protocol and Dimension Widening, but we were […]

Universal Analytics: Now out of beta! is a post from: Analytics Talk by Justin Cutroni

The post Universal Analytics: Now out of beta! appeared first on Analytics Talk.

We’ve been talking about Universal Analytics for a long time – over a year. In that time Universal has always been in beta because it was not 100% compatible with the existing version of GA. Sure, various parts of the Universal platform have rolled out, like the Measurement Protocol and Dimension Widening, but we were missing things like Remarketing and Audience data. But no more :)

I’m excited to say that as of today, April 2, 2014, Universal Analytics is out of beta!

Universal Analytics: The next generation of Google Analytics

Let’s run through everything you need to know about the announcement.

100% Feature Compatibility

Universal Analytics now supports all standard Google Analytics features. This includes:

Remarketing with Google Analytics. This is one of my favorite analytics features – and it made me very sad that Universal Analytics did not support it. But that’s in the past – You can now use the remarketing feature with Universal Analytics.

Audience reporting. The audience reports are an awesome way to understand who is using your site. They include data like gender and interest categories. This can be incredible helpful when trying to understand if the correct audience is using your site. Now you can use this feature with Universal Analytics.

Premium SLA Support. For all of those using Google Analytics Premium, all of your standard SLAs now apply to Universal Analytics. This includes data collection, data processing, etc.

Full Google Tag Manager support. Google Tag Manager now fully supports all Universal Analytics features, this includes audience data and the new User ID feature (discussed below).

I’ve said it many, many times – I’m a big fan of tag management. If you are going to migrate to Universal Analytics you might as well migrate to Tag Manager (or any tag management solution) now!

Universal Analytics is Google Analytics – and vice versa. Everything that Google Analytics can do, Universal Analytics can do – and more :)

Cross Device Measurement

In addition to complete feature compatibility, cross device measurement, via the User-ID feature, is now available.

The User-ID feature let's you measure the user journey across multiple devices - and even in stores.

The User-ID feature let’s you measure the user journey across multiple devices – and even in stores.

As you recall, this feature lets businesses use their own User-ID to measure customers across multiple devices. This feature includes some awesome reports to help businesses understand which devices and behaviors generate value. Here’s a quick overview:

Device Overlap: This report can help you identify what types of devices your users use to access your service or content.

The Device Overlap report shows what percentage of users access your content from multiple devices.

The Device Overlap report

Device Paths: This report will show the last five devices that were used prior to a conversion. It’s a bit like the Multi-Channel Funnels report – but for devices.

The Device Path report shows the last five devices that were used prior to a conversion.

The Device Path report

Acquisition Device: This report shows revenue based on the device that generated the first conversion. It’s can help you understand if users on a certain device have a larger impact on revenue.

The Acquisition Device Report.

The Acquisition Device Report

Understanding cross device measurement, and implementing it correct, is a huge topic – way more than I can cover in one post. I’ll be publishing a few other articles that explain cross device measurement in Google Analytics ASAP.

Time-zone Based Processing

In addition to the above features, there’s one more piece that is rolling out today. Google Analytics users can now specify the time-zone where their data is processed. In the past all data was processed in the Pacific Timezone (because that’s there Google is).

But now data processing will occur in the time zone of each data view.

The time zone setting in a view now controls when your data is processed.

The time zone setting for a view now controls when your data is processed.

While most people will not notice a big difference, this is a HUGE improvement for many users in Australia, Japan and other parts of Asia.

This also means that, for some users, automated daily reports will arrive on the correct day!

Do you need to migrate?

Ok, so that’s a brief overview of what’s happening today. But the big question that everyone will ask is, “do I need to migrate to Universal Analytics?”

No, you do not need to migrate to Universal Analytics – at least not now.

However, you need to start planning to migrate.

Universal Analytics is the new platform – all new features will be developed for UA. So if you want to use the new shiny things in the future you need to be on UA.

But migrating t can be a lot of work depending on your specific measurement plan. I’ll address that in another post.

Ok, that’s it for this post. But there is a lot more on Universal Analytics coming.

Universal Analytics: Now out of beta! is a post from: Analytics Talk by Justin Cutroni

The post Universal Analytics: Now out of beta! appeared first on Analytics Talk.

“What Would be Worse than Launching C**p?” – Compell.dk on Email Marketing

The best way to improve your email marketing is to ask an expert what works and what doesn’t. He has years of experience ahead of you, so he has the prerequisites to give you good advice. To find out what … Continue reading

The best way to improve your email marketing is to ask an expert what works and what doesn’t. He has years of experience ahead of you, so he has the prerequisites to give you good advice.

To find out what are some of the best strategies to tackle email marketing, we turned to the experts who are deeply involved with the game of email, and picked their brains with a few questions about what works and what doesn’t.

Professionals achieve expert status because they learn the hard way: testing, continuous improvement, testing again, taking risks, comparing notes with other professionals, and shipping campaigns no matter what.

The reason someone is an expert at email marketing is because they’ve done the hard work. There are no shortcuts to gaining expertise. You have to go yard by yard, until you get the touchdown.

Bjarke2

Bjarke Bekhøj, Compell.dk

Today we are interviewing Bjarke Bekhøj, the leader of Compell.dk, a very active online marketing company located in Aarhus, Denmark.

Bjarke started Compell back in 2011, and it’s the brainchild of his passion for online marketing.

In this interview with Bjarke we are covering several important topics related to email marketing:

  • common mistakes companies are making
  • great email marketing tools
  • the ROI of email
  • companies just starting to use email marketing
  • and more…

Q1. Tell us about yourself and about your company.

Compell is an online marketing company located in Aarhus C, Denmark. At Compell we specialize in a variety of online marketing disciplines such as email and social media marketing, SEO, link building and remarketing.

I started Compell back in 2011 and the company is the ‘product’ of my passion for business strategy, sales and marketing. A passion that my team of coworkers, with their different fields of expertise, and I strive to put into use every day, in order to improve our clients’ businesses and let them benefit from the value of online marketing.

We deliver tailored solutions and measurable results because we believe that every client is different and has different needs in order to succeed.

All this from a very down-to-earth work environment, where our clients feel just as much as home as we do ourselves.

Q2. What are the 3 biggest or the most common mistakes companies are making when running email marketing campaigns?

  1. They use inside-out content that is irrelevant for the receivers.
  2. They do not put any effort into making the subscribers lists grow before sending out one newsletter after another.
  3. They forget that the emails that we send out today mostly are opened via smart phones or tablets and they therefore neglect the fact that the newsletters’ content may not be seen or read as intended.

Q3. What are your favorite email marketing tools? Why did you choose these tools, and how did they help you?

Campaign Monitor and MailChimp are both excellent tools for email marketing.

Actually, they both share a great deal of features and possibilities, but there are still differences, such as price and usability, which is why we work with both email marketing services.

We often use Campaign Monitor because it has a great usability to it – not just for us but for our clients as well.

By giving our clients access to their own accounts in Campaign Monitor, they can easily learn to understand the mechanisms that lies behind the creation of a newsletter, making it easier and more beneficial for both parties to plan and create newsletters and the client’s email marketing in general.

MailChimp actually has a more sleek design and a great usability to it – however, this is mostly limited to professionals who work with the system on a daily basis.

To a client it may be too complex to actually understand the features of the service within a short-term period, which is why we limit the use of MailChimp to our professionals within the company.

Q4. How does the ROI of Email Marketing compare to other popular marketing channels (website, social, search etc)? Is Email Marketing a viable source of clients/revenue?

Email Marketing is the most viable marketing solution both short term and long term.

Email Marketing gives continuity in the communication with your clients, which fosters a great basis for a loyal relationship between you and your clients – and that, of course, equals a measurable ROI.

Q5. Let’s say a new company is just trying out email marketing, what would you recommend them to do? Can you help them outline a basic plan/strategy?

There is a simple way to put this: “Launch crap – but launch!”

When trying out email marketing you must start with the basics.

Ask yourself: “Whom, what and why”, and you have already come a long way.

The next step: Just do it!

You might be nervous that what you are launching is not good enough or needs lots of adjusting, but you can literally spend months trying to adjust and perfect your content.

Try asking yourself: “What could be worse than launching crap?”

Well, the answer is simple: Not launching anything!

Once you have sent out your first newsletters you can begin to adjust and maybe design new templates etc. to perfect the content – all the while your lists of subscribers and customers are growing thanks to your email marketing efforts.

Q6. What would be the 3 essential resources on email marketing that make/made a difference for you? (articles, websites, books, reports, whitepapers)

Working with email marketing on a daily basis makes it essential that you keep yourself up to date.

By following blogs at Campaign Monitor and MailChimp we are always up to date with the most recent tools or features in these services.

These blogs are great if you want to learn more about optimizing your email marketing while working specifically with Campaign Monitor or MailChimp.

For a more general outtake on email marketing I recommend Deliverability.com.

This blog delivers some very ‘boiled-down’ and simple guidelines or rules, that will help you optimize your email marketing.

Q7. Please share with us a very useful/interesting email marketing tip or trick.

Try using email marketing as a 1:1 tool.

Normally you probably want to send out your email to as many subscribers as possible, but sometimes you just need to send out one mail.

Using your email marketing service to deliver a 1:1 newsletter is an interesting way of making sure that your information gets out to that one specific person while “disguising” it as a message meant for a public audience.

Key takeaways, insights and tips from Bjarke Bekhøj, Compell.dk:

  • Email has great ROI, both long term & short term.
  • Launching a “crappy” campaign is way more useful that not launching at all. Trial, Error, Optimize. Repeat.
  • Optimize your email newsletter for multiple devices.
  • Even though you are blasting a whole email list, personalize your newsletter so that it looks & feels like you are sending a personal email.
  • Grow your email list continuously.
  • Learn about the basics and grow with each new campaign.

***

Thank you Bjarke for this interview.Bjarke

Check out Compell.dk website here.

Like Compell.dk on Facebook here.

Folow Bjarke on Twitter here

What We Learned From 3 Million Leads – Part I: Targeting Rules

A few months ago we managed to reach a very important milestone in journey to make PadiAct the best email lead generation tool for all platforms and businesses of all sizes. That mark represents collecting 3 million leads for our users. … Continue reading

A few months ago we managed to reach a very important milestone in journey to make PadiAct the best email lead generation tool for all platforms and businesses of all sizes.

That mark represents collecting 3 million leads for our users.

We were extremely happy to hit the mark at the start of the 2014, and this year we hope we can quadruple the amount of leads we collect for our users.

We have a live counter on PadiAct’s homepage, you can check it out if you are curious.

Because we love numbers and we find beauty in data and statistics, we are starting a series of articles called: “What we learned from 3 million leads we collected”.

We hope by sharing more of our stats & data, we can help business from all over the world attract more qualitative leads.

In this series we have a look at how we managed to collect 3 million leads, what proved to be successful, what works and what doesn’t. 

Hopefully, we can demystify lead generation for most people so that they can have a more pragmatic approach to collecting emails.

In the first part of the series we are going to cover the “Targeting rules“.

Less is more

“Less is more” is one of our core mantras, as we are not looking just to get our users more leads, we are striving to get them the best leads.

People are bothered by pop-ups and fly-out subscription forms, not because of the copy or the offer, but because of the timing.

Imagine this: you’ve just entered a website and after a few seconds you get a pop-up that urges you to subscribe to get the latest offers. If you are a totally new visitor, that can be a very distracting and annoying, and in some case, it can drive you away.

Why would you pass on a lead, just because you were to eager to show him a subscription form?

We think there is a better solution to this: you should target people when they are in the mood to “hear you out”, not before that, and not after they decided to leave your website.

This approach doesn’t mean less leads, but for sure it means better, more interested leads.

Because of this particular way of thinking about lead generation, we are continuously investing in our behavioral targeting engine, by adding more targeting rules to it and analyzing visitor patterns, to make sure we show up our forms at the best time, when the visitor is actually considering subscribing.

Not before, not after.

Always at the right time!

Now let’s get back to 3 million targeted leads we wanted to talk about.

We went in our “records”, we crunched some numbers, checked out hundreds of campaigns, and we got some interesting insights from our users (both paying & free users).

Why targeting engaged visitors is so important and why you should you care about it

Most of the lightbox email capturing tools out there are promoting a very bad habit: “target all website visitors”.

While in the case of blogs it might be useful, that doesn’t mean it should be the industry standard, especially not for big websites or ecommerce websites.

If you used or know about PadiAct, you probably know that at the core of our product we have a very flexible behavioral targeting system that allows our users to target specific segments of traffic.

While the “target all people” mentality can attract a fair amount of email subscribers, we think this is counter-productive on the long term.

Why?

Because you treating all visitors the same.

(Un)Fortunately, not all visitors are equally as important.

Some visitors need some time “alone” with your website. So, they would disregard a pop-up right there in their faces, 1 second after they landed on your website. These visitors might leave your site immediately. Why scare them away?

targeting

We  always advise targeting people after they’ve spent some time on the website, and maybe after they browse through a few pages. There’s no big rush, we know everyone is in a hurry, but that’s no reason to push the visitor to do certain actions before they get to trust your website. 

If you don’t rush the visitor, you can ask more engaged visitors to subscribe, not just anyone who landed on your website. If you calculate the average value of an email subscriber for your business, driving the right type of email subscribers (more engaged) might make the difference for you. Driving better leads will increase the average value of one’s email subscribers.

The harsh truth: Not all people are interested in your brand and/or your offer, so why engage with all visitors, when you can target and convince your most valuable visitors: the ones that actively engage with your content and website. 

After analyzing our users’ campaigns, we noticed something awesome. We noticed that most of our users applied our advice, and worked to bring better leads, not just to collect any email address.

You see, for some people it might look like a number’s game, collect more email address – this will improve revenue (eventually), but for people that get it, it can make a huge difference in their marketing. Instead of having thousands of people on their list after a few contests and giveaways, you will have people that “deep dive” your product catalog and website.

We are glad that this message has reached our users, and they prove us on a daily basis that this approach works great for businesses all over the world. If it wasn’t working, probably we would’ve been out of business by now.

How to Get Bucket Loads of Leads On a Daily Basis

PadiAct has over 30 rules (inclusion and exclusion rules), and we add rules quite frequently based on customer requests and lead experiments we run.

Because of these rules our users  have the flexibility to target visitors exactly how they want to, when they want to, on what pages they want to.

They can go and have a more broad approach by targeting based on time spent on the website, and a minimum of pages visited, or they can go very granular with their targeting, and target people coming from specific websites/traffic sources and target only visitors who get passed certain website elements or are triggering different events.

From our point of view, this is what an expert marketer needs: a flexible & powerful tool to targeting website visitors.

After we hit the 3 million mark, we wanted to learn what are the most used targeting rules by our users, and this is what we learned:

(click for full image)

(click for full image)

Here’s also the table version, in case you need it:

Targeting Rule Percentage
Target People a # of Times (Once, On Each Visit, On Every Pageview) 28%
Target People After They Visited a # of Pages 23%
Target Returning/New Visitors 20%
Target People That Spend # Seconds on Your Website 7.5%
Exclude People Interacting With Certain Pages on Your Website 4.5%
Target People Intectacting With Certain Pages on Your Website 3.5%
Exclude People Coming from Marketing Campaigns (CPC, Email etc) 2.5%
Exclude People that already converted 1.5%
Target People coming from certain websites 1.5%
Target People only when they scroll down 1%
Other rules 7%

Another interesting insight we got after looking into our users’ campaigns was that the most used targeting rules are usually used together, that’s why they appear to be more prevalent.

With just these 4 rules, our users can create a radically different setups, and target different segments based on how visitors interact with their websites.

Let’s go deep into the rules, to learn how they work.

The “Target People a # of Times” has 3 options:

  • target people only once
  • on each visit
  • for every pageview

Depending on the type of website, one option might fit you better than the other, but we learned that most people choose only once or on each visit.

With “Target People After They Visited a # of Pages” you can specify the minimum no. of pages before targeting a visitor and you can count the pageviews that correspond with other targeting rules or any pageviews.

“Target Returning/New Visitors” is one of the most powerful. Based on what website you run, it might make more sense to target new visitors, as you want to include them in a lead nurturing campaign or send them some education content.

This rule has a have a huge influence on the subscription rates, as targeting visitors based on recency can drive loads of email leads, especially if you compliment your strategy with a cleverly designed subscription form

The 4th most used targeting rule, “Target People That Spend # Seconds on Your Website”, allows you to target people based on the amount of time they’ve spent on your website. Usually we see campaigns with at least 10 seconds delay since the user landed on the website.

As you can see, you can go really granular or have a broad approach to targeting.

You can choose to target all new visitors that spend 10 seconds on your website and visit at least one page, or you can choose returning visitors, who browse through 3-4 pages, and spend at least 1-2 minutes on your website. Of course you can take this even further, and play with the rules however you wish.

Our advice, no matter what email capturing tool you are using, always A/B test different campaign setups, this way you can find the middle ground between the subscription rate you want, and the way your visitors behav.

The cool thing about flexible targeting rules is that the only limitation is your imagination. :)

OK. So far we only talked about inclusion rules. Let’s talk a minute about what people we don’t want on our email list. Here’s a sample of people we wouldn’t want to target:

  • already subscribed (we already have them, why bother them with forms?)
  • people that already converted
  • people coming from different sources of traffic
  • people who are in the process of buying from you

Exclusions rules are extremely helpful, especially when you want to go beyond the norm, and make sure you treat your visitors in a very unique way, by making sure you know in what relation are they with your website and your brand.

Having this customization in mind, exclusion rules can be used to exclude the profiles of visitors described above.

So, as you can see, you can personalize your targeting rules so that you target only the prospects, and not the clients. Isn’t that cool or what? :)

I hope you enjoyed the first part of our series, if you have any questions about the targeting rules, just drop us a comment.

Who is Winning at the Game of Marketing? Email vs Social Media Stats

People have been arguing/debating over the value of these 2 for some time now. Because of this constant debate, we decided to put some perspective into the argument. Let the numbers decide. If you are a smart marketer, you will … Continue reading

People have been arguing/debating over the value of these 2 for some time now.

Because of this constant debate, we decided to put some perspective into the argument. Let the numbers decide.

If you are a smart marketer, you will follow the data.

You can still try out new stuff before you have the data, it’s OK to experiment, but it’s even better to make sure you have overview over some of the most popular marketing channels out there.

Instead of choosing sides, we are going to provide you with some interesting statistics and let you decide which one is winning at the game of marketing: email or social media.

email_social_media

Email – old, but effective; Social Media – new, hip, ROI not so great

Depending on your industry/niche you might be inclined to like one over the other.

Email                                     VS             Social Media Stats

  1. As of 2013, there are 3.6 billion email accounts (Source)
  2. 91% of consumers check their email daily (Source)
  3. People spend 13 hours of their workweek in their email inbox. (Source)
  4. 74% of consumers prefer to receive commercial communications via email (Source)
  5. 54% of emails sent by businesses are marketing messages (Source).
  6. 60% of marketers believe email marketing produces positive ROI (Source)
  7. 66% of consumers have made a purchase online as a result of an email marketing message (Source).
  8. Email marketing has an ROI of 4,300% (Source).
  9. 17% of marketers don’t track or analyze email metrics for their organization (Source)
  10. 76% of email opens occur in the first two days after an email is sent (Source).
  1. 4.2 billion people access social media sites via mobile devices (Source)
  2. 95% Of Facebook users log into their accounts daily (Source)
  3. 27% of total U.S. internet time is spent on social networking sites. (Source)
  4. Social media produces almost double the marketing leads of trade shows, telemarketing, direct mail, or PPC. (Source: Source)
  5. 52% of marketers cite difficulties in accurately measuring ROI as their biggest source of frustration in social marketing. (Source)
  6. 52% of all marketers have found a customer via Facebook in 2013. (Source)
  7. More than 23% of marketers are investing in blogging and social media (Source)
  8. 30% of traffic from social media is from SlideShare.net (Source)
  9. 53% of social media marketers don’t measure their success. (Source)
  10. 53% say a Youtube Video influenced their purchase at least once (Source)

***

Gathering the stats for this article was very revealing.

It was funny to see to see how some people bash email for being an “old technology”, but ignore to see the ROI of it. Old technology doesn’t mean obsolete technology, and new technology doesn’t mean it’s going to be a cash-cow you can milk at your will.

We are big fans of email marketing, that’s why we’ve built PadiAct, but that doesn’t mean we don’t find social media valuable.

A smart marketer should know how to use different marketing channels to drive more conversions. Conversion isn’t as easy as 1-2-3. You need to influence decisions over multiple marketing channels.

We don’t have favorite channels, we only care about what brings in revenue.

That’s why we are going to use whatever works for us and brings in more revenue.

For us, at this moment email is way more valuable than social, but we don’t neglect the fact that social media is a new opportunity for businesses to make themselves more visible, that’s why we keep a social appearance.

Which one do you prefer? Social media or Email? Which one brings in for you more business? Which one has better ROI?

Let us know through a comment.

Advanced Content Tracking with Universal Analytics

A while ago I wrote Advanced Content Tracking – a post about how to measure if users are actually reading your content. I’ve been getting a lot of requests to update this code for Universal Analytics. So here it is – an updated script specifically for use with Universal Analytics. This Google Analytics customization collects […]

Advanced Content Tracking with Universal Analytics is a post from: Analytics Talk by Justin Cutroni

The post Advanced Content Tracking with Universal Analytics appeared first on Analytics Talk.

A while ago I wrote Advanced Content Tracking – a post about how to measure if users are actually reading your content. I’ve been getting a lot of requests to update this code for Universal Analytics.

So here it is – an updated script specifically for use with Universal Analytics.

This Google Analytics customization collects data as users scroll down a page. It uses events to track when a post loads, when the user scrolls more than 150 pixels, when the user reaches the bottom of the content and when the user reaches the bottom of the page.

This technique uses Google Analytics events to track a user as they scroll down a page of content.

This technique uses Google Analytics events to track a user as they scroll down a page of content.

The end result is some cool data about how many users actually read content. Here’s a sample of what the data looks like. This is just an basic event report with the Event Action and Event Label.

You can access the Reading data in your Event reports. Here we see a single article and how often users scrolled, read the whole article and got to the bottom of the page.

You can access the Reading data in your Event reports. Here we see a single article and how often users scrolled, read the whole article and got to the bottom of the page.

The Scroll Tracking Code

Here is the JavaScript code that measures user scrolling.


TIP – You can use the tabs at the top of the code window to try the script. Just click on Result.

What’s changed in this version?

First, the blog post title is now collected as part of the event. Specifically I’m pulling the page title from the HTML and putting it into the event label. This makes it easier to drill down and see which pages people are reading. This was possible before using the Page Title dimension, but using the event label makes it just a bit easier. See the image above.

Another thing I change is I now use a Custom Dimension rather than a Custom Variable, to collect the ‘reader type’. Custom variables do not exist in Universal Analytics.

This change will impact your data! You will no longer see data in the Custom Variables report – because you’re not using Custom Variables. Custom Dimensions are only available in Custom Reports and Custom Dashboards.

I also changed how the Custom Dimensions are set. This script will set a Custom Dimension when the user reaches the bottom of the post content – not the bottom of the page. When they reach the bottom of the content they are categorized as a scanner or a reader.

  • A scanner is someone that simple scrolls to the bottom of the content in less than 60 seconds.
  • A reader is someone that take more than 60 seconds to reach the bottom of the content.

This is hardly a scientific way to categorize users, but it works for me :)

Finally, I added three custom metrics to store the time metrics: time to scroll, time to content bottom and time to page bottom.

Remember, in order to configure Custom Dimensions and Custom Metric you must first add them via your Google Analytics admin settings.

Other than the above changes the functionality is still the same.

Implementing the code

Step 1: There are a few code changes that you must make in order for this code to work on YOUR site.

1. Turn off debugging: This flag will display alert messages, rather than send GA data, when the user scrolls, reaches the bottom of the content and reaches the bottom of the page. If you do not set this to FALSE your users will get all sorts of alert messages :)

2. Decide how far you want for scroll depth: I send an event after the user scrolls 150 px. You can change this value, but I believe it works fine and does capture user engagement.

3. Specify where the bottom of your content is: This is the most important setting. This script sends an event when the user gets to the bottom of a post. That’s determined by the HTML. For me, the HTML is identified as .entry-content, as shown in this code.

if (bottom >= $('.entry-content').scrollTop() + $('.entry-content').innerHeight() && !endContent) {

You must change this line of code to identify a piece of HTML on your site that signifies the end of the content. This is the hardest part of the implementation.

Step 2: Add the code before the closing on your site. Make sure it appears AFTER the Universal Analytics page tag. It should look something like this when complete:

<head>

... all sorts of tags ...

<script>
  //
  // Universal Analytics page tag
  //
  (function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){
  (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o),
  m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m)
  })(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga');

  ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXX-YY');
  ga('send', 'pageview');

  //
  // Scroll tracking script
  //
  jQuery(function($) {
    // Debug flag
    var debugMode = true;

    // Default time delay before checking location
    var callBackTime = 100;

    // # px before tracking a reader
    var readerLocation = 150;

    // Set some flags for tracking & execution
    var timer = 0;
    var scroller = false;
    var endContent = false;
    var didComplete = false;

... More code here ...

</script>

That should be it. You should see data instantly in the Real Time Event reports.

I encourage you to read the instructions in my original post.

Finally, a lot of people have asked me about implementing this script with Google Tag Manager. This really warms my heart :) I love tag management!

You can use this script with Google Tag Manager – but it takes a bit of work. I’ll write a separate post on that topic.

That’s it. I hope you find this script useful. Feel free to modify it to fit your needs. I’ve really enjoyed the data that it generates – it’s helped me better understand my readers and content.

Advanced Content Tracking with Universal Analytics is a post from: Analytics Talk by Justin Cutroni

The post Advanced Content Tracking with Universal Analytics appeared first on Analytics Talk.

10 Valentine’s Day Marketing Ideas for Ecommerce Websites

Oh, Valentine’s Day! One of the finest days of the year, a day when ecommerce businesses can drive some serious revenue. If you are on the hunt for some fresh ecommerce marketing ideas or you just need some inspiration for … Continue reading

Oh, Valentine’s Day!

One of the finest days of the year, a day when ecommerce businesses can drive some serious revenue.

If you are on the hunt for some fresh ecommerce marketing ideas or you just need some inspiration for your Valentine’s Day Marketing campaign, you came to the right place.

Before we go into the list, you should also check out our 2 other articles about Valentine’s Day:

Now, let’s get back to our list.

10 Valentine’s Day Ecommerce Marketing Ideas

1. Increase your email list on the short term

Even though you shouldn’t be lazy and you should be focused on collecting email leads at a good rate throughout the whole year, we forgive you if you didn’t, and we offer you a solution to get a huge amounts of subscribers on the short term.

What you should do is use PadiAct and target visitors with a pop-up and a clever copy.

Here’s an example of what targeting rules you can use:

returning_visitors

You can remove the targeting rule about timing if you want to target people as soon as they enter the website, but depending on the website, sometimes is better to leave people some time before you show them the pop-up.

Here’s a pop-up subscription box example and a copy related to your targeting rules:

pop-up-overlay

The Pop-up looks pretty simple, I know, but I’m sure it can drive great results, as eConsultancy reports that a pop-up overlay will increase opt-ins by up to 400%.

To maximize your results from this, consider A/B testing certain scenarios against each other, so that you use the best subscription form for your website.

2. Create a last-minute package

Design a last-minute package for the late birds who didn’t realize that Valentine’s Day is knocking at their door.

You could send out emails a few days before Valentine’s Day to be sure you can also deliver in time any orders.

Extra tip: think about a similar package for the early birds. You need to make everyone happy.

3. Create an ebook called “How to save Valentine’s Day”

How to Save Valentine's Day

“How to Save Valentine’s Day – an Amazon Bestseller”

Offer it as an incentive to people who didn’t order to get their products delivered on time, but will get their products 1 or 2 days after the V Day. Maybe you’ll save a few relationships.

4. Run an online Kissing Booth Content

People can upload pictures of them and their loved ones kissing and they can win products, coupons or they can get different offers at a great price.

To make everyone a winner what you could do is to offer a small discount to all participants.

5. Run A Black-Friday Type of V Day Flash Sale

This year’s Valentine’s Day falls on Friday, so you can use that” excuse” to organize a Flash Sale at midnight with huge discounts or incredible promo offers.

Use this opportunity to get rid of unnecessary stock and or sell bundles.

Maybe you can use this opportunity to drive more revenue from your email list, by making this Flash Sale only available to your email subscribers.

6. Create an Valentine’s Day web app

The app should allow people to send love themed e-cards to their loved ones.

Also, together with the e-cards people can also send a voucher or can subscribe their loved ones to your newsletter.

With this one, you are hitting 2 birds with one stone, making people happy and also getting closer to a sale.

7. Offer free luxurious wrapping to available on Valentine’s Day

Insert a tick-box in your checkout process that allows people to check it if they want their order to be gift wrapped in a luxurious paper.

People don’t want to loose too much time with the gift wrapping, so you are saving them time and money and also closing a sale for yourself. Sweet, right?

8. Create gender specific showcases

Help your customers by telling them what gifts are right for their loved ones. We all know, searching for a gift can be a very complicated tasks, nobody wants to screw it up, so this would definitely make your customers’ life easier.

Also considering that the average spent in the US is $130/gift, this will be a great chance to sell more expensive items.

Here’s how Ralph Lauren did it.

Valentines-Day-Website-Example

Example via PrestaShop Blog.

9. Create specific showcase based on FB relationship status

Thanks to Facebook, people now probably care more about their relationship status than ever. So, you can leverage this to create some kind of specific lists based on FB relationship status.

I think this might appeal to a younger audience, so if you catering to teens this might be an exciting opportunity for you.

10. Rebrand your live chat into “Cupid’s Hotline”

For until you consider Valentine’s Day done as a holiday rebrand your live chat into Cupid’s Hotline.

Instruct your customer representatives on how to suggest gift ideas to your customers. Teach them how to up-sell, cross-sell and how to provide added-value.

This way you make the idea of live chat way more appealing to your customers, and also, you are capitalizing on your customer representatives communication skills to drive more sales.

Final thoughts

As you can see, there are plenty of things you can try to drive more sales on Valentine’s Day, to get your business noticed or to make your customers happy.

You just need to pick a few ideas, adapt them to fit your needs, and push them hard so that you maximize your efforts.

Please let us know if you enjoyed any of our ideas, or if you have an idea of yours, please share it with us.

 

How to Increase Your Open Rates on Valentine’s Day

Everyone wants a piece of the pie that it’s called Valentine’s Day. With men expected to spend more than $130 on average and women to spend on average at least $50, online marketers are dying to get a share of … Continue reading

Everyone wants a piece of the pie that it’s called Valentine’s Day.

With men expected to spend more than $130 on average and women to spend on average at least $50, online marketers are dying to get a share of a period that topped 18.6 billion dollars in 2013.

But wait, there’s more…

In 2011 the online sales reached 2.65 billion dollars. So yeah, we have the premises to achieve incredible results, and because email it’s still the best channel to drive sales, we need to take email marketing seriously.

But for that we need to come up with some smart email subject lines to get our emails opened.

7 Email Subject Lines Ideas

Sean Platt in an article for Copyblogger says this subject line is the most effective he ever met. He saw open rates of over 90%, and in some tests of over 100%, that means some users opened the email more than once.

He didn’t use it for Valentine’s Day, but I’m sure if you can target a specific segment, e.g. the single segment of your list, you can achieve the same results as Sean Platt did.

You will never guess what subject line he is talking about: “You are not alone”.

Retail Email Blog does a very good job of documenting the most interesting subject lines that are used on Valentine’s Day email marketing campaigns. Our favorite selection from their Season Finale Post Series are:

What’s better than flowers or candy for Valentine’s Day?
Used by Fredericks of Hollywood in their 2011 Valentine’s Day campaign.

Cupid made us do it – 14% OFF EVERYTHING! Just today
Used by Norm Thompson also in 2011.

Love at First Sight, Plus Complimentary Shipping‏
Used by Tiffani in 2010.

20% Off + Tips to Create a Mood in the Bedroom
Used by Art.com in 2007

Pizza Restaurant, via Inbox Vision, teaches us a great lesson on copywriting with 2 excellent subject lines:

You had me at hello.
Clever use of the famous catchphrase from Jerry Maguire.

The greatest love lines of all times and pizza to share this weekend.
Nothing more cheesy, yet effective, than great love lines from the movies and a pizza :).

Achieve High Open Rates: Mailchimp Style

The guys from Mailchimp have a great habit on creating really inspiring posts.

In a particular one, they’ve talked about the best and the worst email subject lines that were delivered through their platform.

The secret to getting stellar open rates is very simple, some people may consider it almost stupid simple: “Describe the subject of your email”.

The best email subject lines that described the subject of the email achieved open rates of over 60%, up to over 87%.

The worst email subject lines, achieved between 1 and 14%.

If you are a Mailchimp user you can capitalize on their Subject Line Researcher that helps you find great ideas for your headline by referencing to how the words you chose performed in other campaigns. Cool, right?

Creating your own formula

If you are trying to create a stellar subject line based on what you read in this article, then you should check out this small guideline I’ve assembled for your:

1. Make me curious

If you want me to open your email, appeal to my curiosity, nothing makes me more curious than a good question, an inciting copy or a great offer that waits to be unveiled.

2. Incentivize me

One great method to get me to click on your email is to incentivize me by offering me a discount, tips & tricks, or something that I can talk about with my friends.

3. Talk about love

It’s Valentine’s Day so you got to talk to me about love, why it matters and yes, you can also say that you love me (even though you probably love me more for my money :P ).

4. Don’t get me confused

You already read Mailchimp’s formula for achieving stellar open rates, so it’s imperative that I understand that your email is about Valentine’s Day. I understand that you probably are a fancy copywriter, but nothing makes you happier than me reading your email and eventually buying something from you. That’s what I call copywriting and a love connection.

Final thoughts

There’s not really much to do with this email subject line thing. Create something relevant and incredibly attractive for your prospects. You already know this, but you probably only needed a few ideas to get ideas flowing through your head.

I hope you got some insights from this article and I’m sure if you planned your campaign correctly and tailored a great email subject line, you can get the most from this Valentine’s Day.

Your email content must also be  great in order to get conversions, but your first obstacle it will always be, to get the email opened and viewed by your list.

Hits, Sessions & Users: Understanding Digital Analytics Data

We talk about data every day – sessions, visits, conversions, pages, hits, etc. etc. etc. But sometimes we fail to understand how all of these metrics fit together and where they come from. Let’s take a look at how digital analytics tools organize data. All digital analytics data is organized into a general hierarchy of […]

Hits, Sessions & Users: Understanding Digital Analytics Data is a post from: Analytics Talk by Justin Cutroni

The post Hits, Sessions & Users: Understanding Digital Analytics Data appeared first on Analytics Talk.

We talk about data every day – sessions, visits, conversions, pages, hits, etc. etc. etc. But sometimes we fail to understand how all of these metrics fit together and where they come from. Let’s take a look at how digital analytics tools organize data.

All digital analytics data is organized into a general hierarchy of users, sessions and hits. It doesn’t matter where the data comes from, it could be a website or a mobile app or a kiosk. This model works for web, apps or anything else.

Digital analytics data is organized into a hierarchy of hits, sessions and users.

Digital analytics data is organized into a hierarchy of hits, sessions and users.

Sometimes we use the terms visitors instead of users and visits instead of sessions – they’re analogous. The onset of mobile devices (and other devices, like set top boxes) have prompted us to introduce new terms into our vocabulary.

It’s important to understand each piece of the hierarchy and how it builds on the other to create a view of our customers and potential customers. Because, at the end of the day, we need to use this data to evaluate our decisions and look for new business opportunities.

Let’s start at the bottom, with hits, and work our way up to users.

Hits

A hit is the most granular piece of data in an analytics tool. It’s how most analytics tools send data to a collection server. In reality, a hit is a request for a small image file. This image request is how the data is transmitted from a website or app to the data collection server.

All data is sent using a hit. Most hits are actually the request for an invisible image file.

All data is sent using a hit. Most hits are actually the request for an invisible image file.

There are many different kinds of hits depending on your analytics tool. Here are some of the most common hits in Google Analytics:

Pageviews/Screenviews: A pageview (for web, or screenview for mobile) is usually automatically generated and measures a user viewing a piece of content. A pageview is one of the fundamental metrics in digital analytics. It is used to calculate many other metrics, like Pageviews per Visit and Avg. Time on Page.

Events: An event is like a counter. It’s used to measure how often a user takes action on a piece of content. Unlike a pageview which is automatically generated, an event must be manually implemented. You usually trigger an event when the user takes some kind of action. The action may be clicking on a button, clicking on a link, swiping a screen, etc. The key is that the user is interacting with content that is on a page or a screen.

Transactions: A transaction is sent when a user completes an ecommerce transaction. You must manually implement ecommerce tracking to collect transactions. You can send all sorts of data related to the transaction including product information (ID, color, sku, etc.) and transactional information (shipping, tax, payment type, etc.)

Social interaction hit: A social interaction is whenever a user clicks on a ReTweet button, +1 button, or Like button. If you want to know if people are clicking on social buttons then use this feature! Social interaction tracking must be manually implemented.

Customized user timings:User timings provide a simple way to measure the actual time between two activities. For example, you can measure the time between when a page loads and when the user clicks a button. Custom timings must be implemented with additional code.

That’s a lot of hit types!

All hit types are sent to Google Analytics via a tracking code. The tracking code variation depends on what you are tracking. If you are tracing a website then JavaScript code, named analytics.js, generates the hits. If you are tracking a mobile app then an SDK (either Android or iOS) generates the hits. If you are tracking a kiosk, then YOU generate the hits with the measurement protocol.

Regardless of the hit type, the hits are all formatted in a similar manner. They are a request for an invisible image and contain data in query string parameters.

http://www.google-analytics.com/collect?v=1&_v=j16&a=164718749&t=pageview&_s=1&dl=http%3A%2F%2Fcutroni.com%2F&ul=en-us&de=UTF-8&dt=Analytics%20Talk%20-%20Digital%20Analytics%20for%20Business&sd=24-bit&sr=1920x1080&vp=1308x417&je=1&fl=12.0%20r0&
_utma=32856364.1751219558.1391525474.1391525475.1391525475.1&
_utmz=32856364.1391525475.1.1.utmcsr%3D(direct)
%7Cutmccn%3D(direct)%7Cutmcmd%3D(none)&_utmht=1391525534970&
_u=cACC~&cid=1751219558.1391525474&tid=UA-91817-11&z=378275262

For all the nerds out there, the data hits can be sent via a GET request or a POST request. This is really important to know, because the amount of data can change. With a GET request you can only send 2048 characters of data. Technically a post can be any length (it’s a setting on most servers), but it’s around 8000 characters when sending data to Google Analytics.

The information in a hit is transformed into dimensions during processing. Every report is just a single dimension, and the corresponding metrics for each value. that you see in your reports.

Each report in Google Analytics shows all of the values for a single dimension, and the corresponding metrics for each value.

Each report in Google Analytics shows all of the values for a single dimension, and the corresponding metrics for each value.

A quick note on mobile…

The mobile SDKs do not send data in real time. They actually store the hits locally and them send them in bursts. This is called dispatching and it’s used for a couple of reasons. First, mobile devices are not always connected to a network. So analytics must store the hits until it detects a connection and then it sends the hits. Second, sending hits in a bunches can help conserve battery life. Don’t worry, dispatching does not impact session calculations – which we’ll talk about right now :)

Session

A session is simply a collection of hits, from the same user, grouped together. By default, most analytics tools, including Google Analytics, will group hits together based on activity. When the analytics tool detects that the user is no longer active it will terminate the session and start a new one when the user becomes active.

Most analytics tools use 30 minutes of inactivity to separate sessions. This 30-minute period is called the timeout.

A session is a collection of hits. It ends when there has been 30 minutes of inactivity.

A session is a collection of hits. It ends when there has been 30 minutes of inactivity.

Google Analytics, and most tools, use the time between the first hit and the last hit to calculate the time on site. The time between hits is also used to calculate other metrics, like time on page. You can read more in my overview of how Google Analytics performs time calculations.

Most tools let you change the default timeout to better suit your needs. For example, if you have a lot of video on your site you might want to change the timeout – especially if your video last more than 30 minutes.

Why?

If a user is watching a 60 minute video (and by watching I mean that no other hits are sent to analytics) their session will end 30 minutes after the first hit. To insure that the session lasts until the end of the video you could change the timeout to match the longest video length.

OR, a better way to extend the session, would be to send additional hits while the user is watching the video. Think about it – more hits create more data points that can be used to calculate time. Trust me, take 12 minutes to read more about how Google Analytics performs time calculations.

Now that we know that hits are grouped together into sessions, let’s look at how sessions are grouped based on users.

Users

Here’s where things start to get interesting. A user is the tools best-guess of an anonymous person. Users are identified using an anonymous number or a string of characters. The analytics tool normally creates the identifier the first time a user is detected. Then that identifier persists until it expires or is deleted.

The identifier is sent to the analytics tool with every hit of data. Then the analytics tools can group hits (and thus sessions) together using the identifier in the hits.

Make sense?

Sessions from the same user can be grouped together as long as each hit has the same user ID.

Sessions from the same user can be grouped together as long as each hit has the same user ID.

Here’s how users are detected on some of today’s most common digital platforms.

Website Users

To measure a user on a website almost all analytics tools use a cookie. A cookie is a small text file. The cookie contains the anonymous identifier. Every time a hit is sent from the browser back to the analytics server identifier stored in the cookie is sent along with the data.

When measuring a website, the analytics tool usually uses a first party cookie to store an anonymous ID.

When measuring a website, the analytics tool usually uses a first party cookie to store an anonymous ID.

Now let’s have the cookie talk.

Google Analytics uses a first party cookie. A first party cookie is connected to the domain that creates it. A first-party can only be used by the domain that sets it. So on this site, the cookie has a domain of cutroni.com and can only be used by this website.

In Universal Analytics the cookie is named _ga and lasts for two years. In the previous version of Google Analytics the cookie was named __utma.

The good thing about a first party cookie is that almost all browsers will allow a first party cookie. It’s a very reliable piece of technology.

First party cookies are challenging when your site spans multiple domains. When a user leaves your site, and traverses to another site that you own, they do not take their first party cookies. In most situations, unless you configure analytics correctly, analytics will set another cookie when the user lands on the second domain.

Analytics uses a first party cookie to maintain a user ID.

Analytics uses a first party cookie to maintain a user identifier.

Now you have one user with two cookies. That could lead to double counting of users. Plus, if we want to create really cool metrics, like Revenue per user, it becomes very, very hard because we don’t know the true number of users.

The other type of cookie, a third-party cookie, can be set and accessed by domains other than the domain that creates it. Some analytics tools will let you use a third party cookie.

The value of a third party cookie is that the analytics tool can use a third party cookie to identify a user as they move from one domain to another.

A third party cookie can be used by multiple domains.

A third party cookie can be used by multiple domains.

However, third-party cookies are not permitted by most browsers – that means no data.

Google Analytics does not use a third party cookie. You can read all about the Google Analytics cookies in the developer documentation.

So what’s the solution here? How do you correctly identify a user if your website spans multiple domains? In the Google Analytics world we use a feature called Cross Domain Tracking. I’m not going to talk about it in this post, but you can read about it in our support documentation.

Mobile Users

Now let’s move on to mobile platforms – something that is very popular :)

Mobile tracking is similar to web tracking. There is an anonymous identifier stored on the device. The identifier is generated every time the app is installed. So if a user deletes the app the identifier will also be deleted. But if a user updates the app the identifier will not change.

The big difference between mobile and web is that the identifier is not stored in a cookie. It’s stored in a database on the mobile device – but it basically functions the same way as a cookie. The identifier is sent on every hit back to the analytics server. The analytics server then uses the identifier to create metrics like unique users.

Here’s one challenge with user measurement on an app. Many apps are not just an app. They’re a hybrid app/website. They use a browser within the app to “frame” content from a website. This can mess up the data collection.

In this situation we have two technologies with two different user identifiers. The app will measure a user based on the ID stored on the device and the website will use a cookie when a page loads in the app.

Mobile apps that "frame in" content from a website, might be sending duplicate hits to the analytics tool.

Mobile apps that “frame in” content from a website, might be sending duplicate hits to the analytics tool.

There are some ways around this, but it’s a long solution that need it’s own blog post. But just be aware of this potential data issue.

Ok, so now we know about website users and mobile users. But what about other digital touch-points, like a kiosk?

Other Digital Touch-points

In today’s world a user can interact with your digital content on lots of different devices (computers, mobile, kiosks, set top boxes, etc.). And that can cause a lot of issues as tools try to de-duplicate users and get an accurate count of users.

One of the key features of Universal Analytics is the ability to track users on devices other than websites and mobile devices, things like a point-of-sale system or a kiosk. It does this using a technology called the measurement protocol.

But how does it actually work?

The measurement protocol works by – wait for it – collecting hits :) These are the same hits that I described above. The big difference is that you must manually build the hits. So if you want to implement analytics on a kiosk, you must create MORE code to build the hits that are sent to Google Analytics.

But what about measuring users when you use the measurement protocol?

When you create the hit you must insert a user identifier into the hit. Google Analytics will then use this identifier as the unique identifier when it processes the data.

To measure users when tracking other devices, like a kiosk, you must insert your own identifier and generate your own data hits.

To measure users when tracking other devices, like a kiosk, you must insert your own identifier and generate your own data hits.

Unlike websites and mobile apps, there is no cookie or database to store the identifier. So the ID does not persist from one hit to another, or from one session to another. You must manually insert the identifier into every hit in every session.

Your code must control the generation of the identifier and the storage of the identifier.

Let’s end it there. That’s a pretty good overview of digital analytics data.

I know this was a really geeky post, but it’s an important subject and will become more and more important.

Now it’s your turn. Thoughts? Please feel free to leave a comment.

Hits, Sessions & Users: Understanding Digital Analytics Data is a post from: Analytics Talk by Justin Cutroni

The post Hits, Sessions & Users: Understanding Digital Analytics Data appeared first on Analytics Talk.

The Ultimate Guide to Email Marketing on Valentine’s Day

According to US National Retail Federation, in 2012 alone people were willing to spend on average $126.03 on Valentine’s Day for their significant other. In 2013, the spend went up to $130.97, so the total spend related to Valentine’s Day … Continue reading

According to US National Retail Federation, in 2012 alone people were willing to spend on average $126.03 on Valentine’s Day for their significant other.

In 2013, the spend went up to $130.97, so the total spend related to Valentine’s Day in the US was estimated at 18.6 billion dollars. In 2012 it was 17.6 billion dollars.

Just like Christmas, Valentine’s Day is a holiday celebrated by pretty much everyone nowadays. Actually, it isn’t just an american tradition anymore, countries all over the world are celebrating Valentine’s Day, and businesses are looking to leverage this.

As always, email marketing is  probably one of your best bets to capitalize on people’s willingness to spend money on Valentine’s Day.

Add some creative advertising and some engaging social media content to the mix and you got yourself a winning strategy.

Opportunity: checked.

Strategy: this article will help you out with that.

What To Do to Win Valentine’s Day

Your Valentine’s Day to do list should look something like this:

  1. add more subscribers to your email lists
  2. segment your list
  3. schedule when you are going to send the emails
  4. write great subject lines
  5. design amazing emails

Valentine’s Day is all about love and that means you shouldn’t have a “one night stand” with your email list. . (tweet this)

Treat this holiday right, and it can bring you HUGE benefits on long term.

Also, don’t make this holiday about you: make it about your customers and about your audience.

Help them experience a day they’ll never want to forget.

How to grow your email list very fast

I know, Valentine’s day is almost here. Getting more email leads & subscribers in such a short time is not an easy task.

Don’t freak out though, everything is not lost. We’ve got a few tips that can earn you some serious Valentine’s business.

Create a valentine’s Day Business Venture

Partner up with other companies, find companies that are not selling products or services suitable for Valentine’s Day. However, they might have bigger email lists than you do.

By partnering up with them you’ll get to increase the sales of your products and they’ll get a partnership commission out of a holiday which otherwise would bring them no extra sales.

Closing a partnership might take time so get it done right now.

ADD BUcketloads of subscribers by using behavioral targeting

If you are not using PadiAct, maybe this is the best opportunity for you to try it out.

You can start by defining a campaign and target people exclusively for the Valentine’s Day lists.

Here are a few tips to get loads of email subscribers from Day 1:

  • identify the most successful products of last year’s Valentine’s Day and ask people to subscribe while visiting similar products
  • target visitors after spending at least 2 minutes viewing the products (they are still in the researching phase)
  • offer them the best reason to subscribe, so they can’t refuse you: let people know about the Valentine’s Day exclusive emails with tips, gifts and promotions.
Setting up targeting rules inside PadiAct.

Example: How to target visitors with PadiAct.

Segment and clean your lists

On the romantic 14th of February and the days before it, the subscribers are going to receive loads of emails with Valentine’s offers. For them, it will be a tipping point and people will probably “abuse” the Report as spam or Unsubscribe buttons.

That’s why, you need to be one step ahead.

The week of 14th of February should be a week when open rates, click rates and purchases are at their best.

Here are a few segments that you should look into:

  • gender: craft emails respecting the fact men & women have different needs
  • activity: the closer you get to the last emails of your Valentine’s Day campaign, the more you should refrain yourself from sending emails to inactive subscribers
  • interest: use different call to actions in emails to identify user interest. Based on the links they’ve clicked, add subscribers in different buckets
  • age: a 40 year couple will probably have a different idea on how to spend that day compared to an 18 year one

A great way to keep your lists clean, is to allow people to opt-out of the Valentine’s Day emails, but to stay subscribed toyour other lists. A visible copy like the following one with the appropriate link should do the job:

I already found a gift and no longer want to receive Valentine’s Day emails.

Drip your emails

We already told you that love is in the air, a “one night stand” is very a bad idea.

Don’t plan a single email for Valentine’s Day. Avoid the “hit and run” approach.

Build a campaign that reminds people about the big day, a campaign with ideas on how to surprise their partners, makes it easy for them to find a gift and then follow up to make sure everything went well.

Is it your first Valentine’s Day email campaign?

Feel free to use the following Valentine’s Day Marketing Calendar:

20th-22ND January – announce Valentine’s Day

Send an email to all your subscribers reminding them that Valentine’s Day is coming. Tell them to hop on the exclusive Valentine’s day email list.

Give a few hints of presents or things they can do for their special one.

Add up to 3 call to actions in the email, each one of them describing a different user intention.

Future campaigns should be sent to visitors based on what link they clicked.

January 27th – 30th – content aware campaign

Based on expressed intention through the links they’ve clicked in the previous email, send them suggestions of gifts.

Make sure to add a story to each gift idea.

People would rather relate to stories than to product descriptions, so you’ll make their choice easier.

February 3RD – 5th – launch THE OFFER

The period when most people do the purchases. The more they delay, the harder it will be to find and have the perfect gift delivered on time.

Be creative about your incentive. Go beyond the classic discounts.

Discounts are always welcomed, but extravagant wrapping of purchased products can make a strong impression, especially on Valentine’s Day.

10th of February – continue with the promotion

Only send to people that opened at least one email in the last 3 months.

From this moment on, you are playing the safe card and you are keepings unsubscribes and spam reports as low as possible. This email should speak of urgency. It’s the last chance of buying a gift, if it’s not too late already.

13th of February – the day before

It’s probably too late to sell anything and deliver it on time. To the subscribers that did not purchase anything for their loved ones, offer them some tips on how to save the day. To the ones that did purchase, give them tips on how to surprise without actually giving them a gift.

This one email might be the one that actually helps you WIN your email list. If you provide them with great ideas on how to save the day, your subscribers will remember you and they will recommend you to all their friends.

15th of February – the day after

Encourage subscribers to write back their stories. Maybe even through in a prize or some gift cards.

Get as many testimonials & stories as possible.

Create content around your customers’ stories (it can be an article, a video or an infographic), and post it on Pinterest, Facebook and, what the heck, release it even on Google+.

Make it a Valentine’s Day that everyone remembers, and promote it heavily so that your competition will be jealous because they’ve decided to have a “one night stand” instead of actually providing help to their audience

Subject lines your email list will not ignore

One of your biggest challenges will be to get as many subscribers to open your emails. Here is what Experian found in a study they’ve conducted last year:

experian

As you see, subject lines are crucial, so here’s a list that can get you started on writing great emails:

  • Hurry, Cupid’s Counting Down! Send a Special Greeting Card
  • 3 Days Until Valentine’s Day. Find The Perfect Gift Today Or It Could Be Your Last.
  • Order now to avoid heartbreak this Valentine’s
  • For love or money?
  • Get gifts as extraordinary as your Valentine
  • Valentine’s Day gifts for your Rebecca
  • You’ll ❤ Key Pieces for the Season
  • We’ve got a crush (or two). How about you?
  • Ten Ways to Say “I Love You”
  • Wine, Chocolates & $0 Shipping
  • Will You Be Our Valentine? Sweepstakes, News, & More To Show Our LUV
  • Last Chance to Get the Look You Love Before V-Day

By sending up to 6 emails ’till the big day, you’ll have a chance to test a few sets of subject lines to find the best one for you.

Design amazing emails

Once you have subscribers open your emails, the copy and the design are going to be decisive in having people become customers as well.

Check out the following designs that were shared heavily on the web. Click on the images to get the full newsletter:

01-apple

02-perfume

03-pink

04-starbucks

05-restaurants

06-trips

07-jewels

08-furniture

 

How will you approach valentine’s day in 2014?

What are your plans for 2014’s Valentine’s Day?

What worked for you the last year and what do you plan to do better in 2014?

Did we miss something? We would love to hear your opinion on this article.

Collect Email Subscribers & Leads Using BlackMail

Here at PadiAct we are committed to growing your email leads & subscribers lists. This is what we know best, this is what we do for hundreds of online businesses. With this mission in mind we are constantly testing and … Continue reading

Here at PadiAct we are committed to growing your email leads & subscribers lists.

This is what we know best, this is what we do for hundreds of online businesses.

blackmail

With this mission in mind we are constantly testing and experimenting with features, pop-ups and targeting rules to find new and effective ways to get you more emails.

Recently, we developed a design that we think will skyrocket your subscription rates.

We introduce you: BlackMail

Hihi! Gotcha!

I had you worried there for a second.

Blackmail_form

BlackMail is a slick, yet elegant, predesigned subscription form that you can use as a popup, left to right slider and bottom slider, just like the other 2 predesigned styles (Default and Good Old Mail).

Adding the image is very easy, you just need to paste the URL where you hosted the image.

Recommended image width is 200px.

How to Start Using BlackMail

  1. Go and edit your campaign.

  2. Select the style to be BlackMail.

  3. Paste your image URL in the field

  4. Personalize the Interaction Look & Feel

  5. Quick preview it to see if you are happy with the results

  6. Fine tune your copy

  7. Save the campaign.

You’re done. Congratulations.

That’s it. Easy, right?

Now, just sit back, relax, and enjoy “the view” (the reports).

From now on, you will collect email leads and subscribers using “BlackMail”.