Dynamic Testing drives 10% click-through lift for multichannel home luxury retailer Frontgate

The very first Frontgate catalog was delivered to 300,000 households wayyyyy back in 1991. It featured the finest home furniture, décor, and more. Today, Frontgate is the leading home luxury multichannel retailer with catalog, ecom…

The very first Frontgate catalog was delivered to 300,000 households wayyyyy back in 1991. It featured the finest home furniture, décor, and more. Today, Frontgate is the leading home luxury multichannel retailer with catalog, ecommerce, and brick-and-mortar operations. This...

Your Definitive Guide To Customer Acquisition

Customer acquisition is the process you go through to gain new customers. It’s how you persuade people to purchase your products or services. Are you doing enough to increase your customer acquisition rates? In this article, we provide your definitive guide to customer acquisition. You’ll learn some advanced strategies for acquiring, and keeping, new customers. […]

The post Your Definitive Guide To Customer Acquisition appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Your Definitive Guide To Customer Acquisition

Customer acquisition is the process you go through to gain new customers. It’s how you persuade people to purchase your products or services.

Are you doing enough to increase your customer acquisition rates? In this article, we provide your definitive guide to customer acquisition.

You’ll learn some advanced strategies for acquiring, and keeping, new customers.

First, let’s look at the cost of customer acquisition.

The Cost

An often neglected part of the customer acquisition process is the cost to do so.

For small businesses and even established ones, this cost can quickly get out of control if it isn’t watched and monitored.

The most successful businesses can rattle off their customer acquisition cost numbers. To help you know your customer acquisition costs (CAC), follow this formula:

  • Take the entire cost of your sales and marketing over a specific time period and divide it by the number of customers you acquired in that same period.

For example, if you spent $1000 on marketing in one year, and you acquired 1000 new customers that year, your CAC is $1.00.

Another helpful number to know is the Lifetime Value of a Customer (LTV). To find this number, you look at the gross margin you expect to make from that customer over the lifetime of your relationship.

In a well-balanced business model, your CAC shouldn’t exceed the LTV of your customer. It should be significantly less.

Now, it’s time for the advanced tips on customer acquisition.

Content Marketing

You’ve probably heard that in this century, content is king. This phrase was coined in 1996 by Bill Gates who saw the future of the Internet as a marketplace for content.

It turns out that content is an allover great tactic for acquiring new customers.

Why? The content you publish on your website allows you to meet new and potential customers head on with the content they need.

By providing your website visitors with the content they want and need, you’ll not only meet their goals, but yours as well. Intrigue your site visitors with practical, useful, educational, important and sometimes humorous content, and you’ll encourage them to sign on as your customer.

Search Engine Optimization

You’ve got the great content to attract new customers, but have you properly optimized it?

Customer acquisition can’t happen if people can’t find your content.

Share your content through email marketing and social media. The more shares and links back to your website, the better. These work together to increase your natural, organic rank in the search engines.

Conversion Rate Optimization

Once your visitors land on your website, you have to do something with them. If they simply land on a page with content, but they don’t see any further actions to take, they’ll just bounce off.

When it comes to customer acquisition, your conversion rate optimization matters. Improve your landing pages to increase your leads and your sales.

Consider A/B testing your copy, calls to action buttons, colors and images to see what works best.

Copy Writing

A piece of your conversion rate depends on your copy – the body copy and your headlines.

Your copy is important. Give great thought to your headlines. Are they catchy? Do they match the content? Are they spot on or misleading?

Then look at your body copy. It should be specific and succinct. Choosing the right words here can make the difference between a sale and a bounce.

If you aren’t sure what works, test your landing pages. This is the best way to find out what copy converts the best.

Social Media Marketing

Social media is another terrific tactic for customer acquisition.

Use your social media platforms to get people back to your website where you can intrigue them with your quality content and then encourage them to take your desired action.

Email Marketing

Have you started building your email list? It’s an essential step to customer acquisition.

For example, a website visitor lands on your optimized landing page, reads your optimized content and then clicks on your call to action – signing up for your email list.

Once on your email list, you can continue to market to them in the privacy of their own inbox.

All of your inbound marketing and SEO worked to encourage them to join your email list. Through your future email marketing, you can direct them to your products and services.

Analytics

Don’t forget your analytics.

The only way to know if your customer acquisition tactics are working is by analyzing your data. Your analytics shows you which of your tactics are most successful and which pages your customers are visiting or leaving.

Use your Google Analytics to see what’s happening on your website. Set up funnels, view your traffic sources and rules and set up your goal tracking.

Then, take a look at who is visiting your website. Find out what they do before and after they sign up on your website or take another action.

A good way to analyze your metrics is to start by making goals and working backwards. Since we’re discussing customer acquisition, that is your goal here.

Then build the funnel. Perhaps it starts with an email sign up, and then you send them an email inviting them to a free trial of your product or service. Ultimately, you hope they’ll convert to full paying, lifetime customers.

Identify your metrics in your funnels. You want to know things like who signed up for your email list or white paper and then who converted into a paying customer.

Final Thoughts

You see that in your definitive guide to customer acquisition, you have many advanced tactics at your disposal.

You’ll find that there are many different ways that lead to the same end goal of customer acquisition.

How do you choose the right strategy? First, you have to know you target audience. Next, you have to know how they’ll make their way through your sales funnel. Do some research on both your audience and your customer acquisition funnel before you create your acquisition strategies.

And, remember, you don’t have to choose just one tactic. Use a few and integrate them for the best success. Your ultimate goal is to increase your website conversion rate through the acquisition of new customers.

Test your strategies, and then test them again. Use what works and refine the rest.

You’ll soon be on your way to growing your company through targeted customer acquisition strategies.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by optimizing your leads and your lead generation process to drive your business online? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Alvaro Serrano

The post Your Definitive Guide To Customer Acquisition appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Optimize your website for holiday conversions with the 2016 Monetate Holiday Prep Guide

Every year during the first week of August, the Monetate Strategy & Insights (S&I) team meets in a well-lit room at the back of the office. They dust the cobwebs off their favorite festive holiday mugs, pour a generous se…

Every year during the first week of August, the Monetate Strategy & Insights (S&I) team meets in a well-lit room at the back of the office. They dust the cobwebs off their favorite festive holiday mugs, pour a generous serving of hot...

The future is now: Mobile traffic up 87% YOY. Social referrals up 80%. We found out why—and what you can do about it.

The U.S. Commerce Department reported that year-over-year (YOY) ecommerce sales growth was 15.8% for Q2 2016. As we reported in the latest Ecommerce Quarterly benchmark report, almost all of that growth can be attributed to th…

The U.S. Commerce Department reported that year-over-year (YOY) ecommerce sales growth was 15.8% for Q2 2016. As we reported in the latest Ecommerce Quarterly benchmark report, almost all of that growth can be attributed to the shopping activity of returning visitors...

7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails

Your customers are the essence of your business. Most business owners instinctively know this. What many don’t know is that you have to cultivate and nurture your customers to grow your base and retain your customers. In this article, we look at seven ways to grow your business with emails. We’ll show you how to […]

The post 7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails

Your customers are the essence of your business. Most business owners instinctively know this.

What many don’t know is that you have to cultivate and nurture your customers to grow your base and retain your customers.

In this article, we look at seven ways to grow your business with emails. We’ll show you how to do it and why.

Let’s look at the transactional email and the power it has to grow your business.

The Transactional Email

Transactional emails are triggered emails. They involve correspondence you send to someone based on the action your user had with your website.

For example, your customer places an online order, and he expects a confirmation in his inbox shortly thereafter. This is a transactional email.

Often times if the customer doesn’t receive your email, he’ll call customer service to find out why not.

How about when someone signs up for your email list. Do you send them a welcome email? Again, this is a transactional email.

If you aren’t leveraging the power of this type of advanced email marketing, you’re missing out on a big chance to grow your customer base.

Bottom line – a transactional email is an advanced way to send trigger-based, ultra-personalized, targeted and highly-specific emails.

You can expect your transactional emails to have high open and click-thru rates and low bounce rates. This is, after all, information that’s valuable to your customer.

How Transactional Emails Grow Your Base

First, your customers are usually happy to see these emails in their inboxes. Because they’ve done something on your website to trigger the info, they are usually expecting it.

Email marketing extends your digital reach well past your website. Your customers have invited you into the inner sanctum of their inbox, so you have a chance to deliver personal, valuable information.

Now let’s look at the seven ways to grow your customer base with emails – transactional emails.

#1: Welcome Email

Someone created an account, made a purchase, downloaded a product or signed up on your site. This is a good tie to send them a welcome email.

Welcome emails usually provide a login and password and a welcome from your company.

Take this time to say thank you and let your customers know how much you appreciate them. Send this email within an hour of the action taken.

You can also include a call to action in the welcome email. How about asking your customers to tweet or share that they joined your company?

#2: Confirmation Email

You send a confirmation email to notify your email user when the action they took on your website is complete.

This email is fairly straightforward as it’s most often a receipt for a purchase, confirmation of a reservation or a link to a download.

Confirmations have all the information your customer needs in them. It’s up to you, though, to make sure you’re getting everything you can out of the email.

You can take the space to add some additional information in your email that provides value for your customer.

Offer them helpful tips and resources. For example, if they purchased a new camera from you, direct them to your website for blogs and whitepapers on how to use it.

If they booked a room at your hotel, send them their confirmation email with a list of restaurants and things to do in the area. Include insider tips only locals know about.

#3: Newsletter Sign Up Confirmation Email

Don’t be the business who neglects to send a newsletter sign up confirmation. Many of your website visitors will be confused if you don’t.

Not only do these emails confirm their subscription, but this is your chance to let them know what to expect and to welcome them to your “family.”

Provide them a list of what you’ll send and when. Give them a brief overview of the types of information you’ll send.

If you offered them something special for joining your list, you want to provide it to them in this email.

#4: Cart Abandonment Email

Cart abandonment is one of the biggest challenges facing e-retailers today, as the average abandonment rate is nearly 70%.

The best way to encourage your customers to come back to your website and complete their purchase is with a transactional email.

Often, people who return to their carts spend more than they had originally planned.

The best time to send this email is within 24 hours of the abandoned cart. You can even include a special offer such as free shipping or 10% off to increase the odds they’ll finish their purchase.

Do put a time limit on the promo – a sense of urgency moves the process along.

#5: Birthday Email

These are easy emails to send and work to further customer loyalty by growing your customer base.

Provide a gift for your customer in this email. Think video, download or special.

#6: Customer Feedback Email

This email solicits feedback from your customer. Ask for comments on your products and services.

It lets your customers know you value their opinion.

#7: Reactivation Email

Send this email to subscribers who used to interact with you, but haven’t in a while. This email is the perfect vehicle to grow your customer base.

These emails keep your company top of mind and remind subscribers why they signed up in the first place.

To Conclude

We’ve looked at seven ways to grow your customer base with emails.

These emails are transactional emails, and they are key to your advanced email marketing strategy.

Why? Transactional emails are expected, and they encourage your users to take another action.

While some transactional emails are sent because of someone’s inaction, many more are sent because of their action.

Another word for transactional emails that grow your customer base is relationship-based emails. These emails have much higher open and click-thru rates. They also have greater revenue potential than regular emails.

It’s in your best interest to harness the power of the transactional email today. Increase your engagement opportunities with relationship-based emails and watch your customer base grow.

We’d like to leave you with one last tip. Ensure that every transactional email you send is optimized for mobile. The email must render as well on a smartphone or tablet as it does on a desktop or laptop computer.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by fine-tuning your landing pages to skyrocket growth among your email subscribers and current customers? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Alexandru Tudorache

The post 7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Introducing Dynamic Testing: the revolutionary way to test ecommerce experiences

You might think most marketing automation solutions feel like a black box. You’re not exactly sure what the software is doing or how it’s deciding which content to put in front of your customers. You might even feel like…

You might think most marketing automation solutions feel like a black box. You’re not exactly sure what the software is doing or how it’s deciding which content to put in front of your customers. You might even feel like...

The Universal Analytics Command Queue

For those of you who remember Google Analytics classic, the next four characters I write after this sentence should ring with nostalgia:

_gaq

_gaq is the name of the global variable that Google Analytics would install when it was executed on a page. The _gaq variable was defined (initially) as an Array. The default snippet had it right at the top:

<script type="text/javascript">
  var _gaq = _gaq || [];
  _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-XXXXX-X']);
  _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);

  (function() {
      var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
      ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
      var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
  })();
</script>

The _gaq array was a command queue for things we wanted Google Analytics to do. The default snippet passed it some stuff right away – specifically, it passed in the instructions to create a tracker and fire a pageview. This pattern was really cool – it allowed for commands to be registered in-line while the browser was busy fetching Google Analytics and was the backbone of GA’s transition to asynchronous loading. No messy callbacks, no need to check if _gaq was defined; once Google Analytics loaded, each command would be executed in the order it appeared in the queue.

Another part of what made this exciting was that non-GA functions could also use the queue, and Google Analytics would call them for us. This allowed for clever folks to push in commands to run before Google Analytics did its tracker creation; for example, if I wanted to fire a callback function when Google Analytics loaded, I could do this:

var _gaq = window._gaq = window._gaq || [];

_gaq.push(function() {
  notifyGALoaded();
});

The first thing GA would do after it finished loading and bootstrapping itself would be to call my function, which would call notifyGALoaded, in turn. I could be comfortable adding this code anywhere, because GA would inherit any existing _gaq values non-destructively. This meant the .push() method always would work.

Then Universal Analytics came along and ruined everything – the new syntax didn’t use the familiar .push() syntax, and instead opted for commands to be pushed in as arguments to the function ga.

Getting Back Our Queue with the Alternative Syntax

Deep in the bowels of the Universal Analytics documentation, there’s an article that describes an alternative syntax for loading Google Analytics. We can use the first part of this snippet to get back our command queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

This snippet instantiates our ga global and configures the internal command queue for us. Now we can go right back to adding commands into our queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Do some stuff
});

Just like with our old _gaq Array, we needn’t be concerned about detechting when Google Analytics loads or accidentially overwriting the existing global.

So…?

You might be thinking “So, what? When would I need that anyways?”. Imagine you’re providing code to a 3rd party, and they want to dictate whether Google Analytics loads or not. You know Google Analytics may load, but you don’t want to force it to load if it doesn’t, and you don’t want to poll every n milliseconds to see if it has loaded. Now you can just instantiate the queue, push in your commands, and carry on worry-free.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;
ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXX-YY', ...)
// etc

You also may want to have code execute only after Google Analytics has loaded. Using this syntax, you can instantiate ga, push in your command, and be guaranteed that it will execute only after Google Analytics has loaded.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Some code I'd like to fire
});

This simple interface provides a really simple way to queue up commands before and after the Google Analytics library loads. How will you use it? Drop me a line or on Twitter.

For those of you who remember Google Analytics classic, the next four characters I write after this sentence should ring with nostalgia:

_gaq

_gaq is the name of the global variable that Google Analytics would install when it was executed on a page. The _gaq variable was defined (initially) as an Array. The default snippet had it right at the top:

<script type="text/javascript">
  var _gaq = _gaq || [];
  _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-XXXXX-X']);
  _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);

  (function() {
      var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
      ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
      var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
  })();
</script>

The _gaq array was a command queue for things we wanted Google Analytics to do. The default snippet passed it some stuff right away - specifically, it passed in the instructions to create a tracker and fire a pageview. This pattern was really cool - it allowed for commands to be registered in-line while the browser was busy fetching Google Analytics and was the backbone of GA's transition to asynchronous loading. No messy callbacks, no need to check if _gaq was defined; once Google Analytics loaded, each command would be executed in the order it appeared in the queue.

Another part of what made this exciting was that non-GA functions could also use the queue, and Google Analytics would call them for us. This allowed for clever folks to push in commands to run before Google Analytics did its tracker creation; for example, if I wanted to fire a callback function when Google Analytics loaded, I could do this:

var _gaq = window._gaq = window._gaq || [];

_gaq.push(function() {
  notifyGALoaded();
});

The first thing GA would do after it finished loading and bootstrapping itself would be to call my function, which would call notifyGALoaded, in turn. I could be comfortable adding this code anywhere, because GA would inherit any existing _gaq values non-destructively. This meant the .push() method always would work.

Then Universal Analytics came along and ruined everything - the new syntax didn't use the familiar .push() syntax, and instead opted for commands to be pushed in as arguments to the function ga.

Getting Back Our Queue with the Alternative Syntax

Deep in the bowels of the Universal Analytics documentation, there's an article that describes an alternative syntax for loading Google Analytics. We can use the first part of this snippet to get back our command queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

This snippet instantiates our ga global and configures the internal command queue for us. Now we can go right back to adding commands into our queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Do some stuff
});

Just like with our old _gaq Array, we needn't be concerned about detechting when Google Analytics loads or accidentially overwriting the existing global.

So...?

You might be thinking "So, what? When would I need that anyways?". Imagine you're providing code to a 3rd party, and they want to dictate whether Google Analytics loads or not. You know Google Analytics may load, but you don't want to force it to load if it doesn't, and you don't want to poll every n milliseconds to see if it has loaded. Now you can just instantiate the queue, push in your commands, and carry on worry-free.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;
ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXX-YY', ...)
// etc

You also may want to have code execute only after Google Analytics has loaded. Using this syntax, you can instantiate ga, push in your command, and be guaranteed that it will execute only after Google Analytics has loaded.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Some code I'd like to fire
});

This simple interface provides a really simple way to queue up commands before and after the Google Analytics library loads. How will you use it? Drop me a line or on Twitter.