The future is now: Mobile traffic up 87% YOY. Social referrals up 80%. We found out why—and what you can do about it.

The U.S. Commerce Department reported that year-over-year (YOY) ecommerce sales growth was 15.8% for Q2 2016. As we reported in the latest Ecommerce Quarterly benchmark report, almost all of that growth can be attributed to th…

The U.S. Commerce Department reported that year-over-year (YOY) ecommerce sales growth was 15.8% for Q2 2016. As we reported in the latest Ecommerce Quarterly benchmark report, almost all of that growth can be attributed to the shopping activity of returning visitors...

7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails

Your customers are the essence of your business. Most business owners instinctively know this. What many don’t know is that you have to cultivate and nurture your customers to grow your base and retain your customers. In this article, we look at seven ways to grow your business with emails. We’ll show you how to […]

The post 7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails

Your customers are the essence of your business. Most business owners instinctively know this.

What many don’t know is that you have to cultivate and nurture your customers to grow your base and retain your customers.

In this article, we look at seven ways to grow your business with emails. We’ll show you how to do it and why.

Let’s look at the transactional email and the power it has to grow your business.

The Transactional Email

Transactional emails are triggered emails. They involve correspondence you send to someone based on the action your user had with your website.

For example, your customer places an online order, and he expects a confirmation in his inbox shortly thereafter. This is a transactional email.

Often times if the customer doesn’t receive your email, he’ll call customer service to find out why not.

How about when someone signs up for your email list. Do you send them a welcome email? Again, this is a transactional email.

If you aren’t leveraging the power of this type of advanced email marketing, you’re missing out on a big chance to grow your customer base.

Bottom line – a transactional email is an advanced way to send trigger-based, ultra-personalized, targeted and highly-specific emails.

You can expect your transactional emails to have high open and click-thru rates and low bounce rates. This is, after all, information that’s valuable to your customer.

How Transactional Emails Grow Your Base

First, your customers are usually happy to see these emails in their inboxes. Because they’ve done something on your website to trigger the info, they are usually expecting it.

Email marketing extends your digital reach well past your website. Your customers have invited you into the inner sanctum of their inbox, so you have a chance to deliver personal, valuable information.

Now let’s look at the seven ways to grow your customer base with emails – transactional emails.

#1: Welcome Email

Someone created an account, made a purchase, downloaded a product or signed up on your site. This is a good tie to send them a welcome email.

Welcome emails usually provide a login and password and a welcome from your company.

Take this time to say thank you and let your customers know how much you appreciate them. Send this email within an hour of the action taken.

You can also include a call to action in the welcome email. How about asking your customers to tweet or share that they joined your company?

#2: Confirmation Email

You send a confirmation email to notify your email user when the action they took on your website is complete.

This email is fairly straightforward as it’s most often a receipt for a purchase, confirmation of a reservation or a link to a download.

Confirmations have all the information your customer needs in them. It’s up to you, though, to make sure you’re getting everything you can out of the email.

You can take the space to add some additional information in your email that provides value for your customer.

Offer them helpful tips and resources. For example, if they purchased a new camera from you, direct them to your website for blogs and whitepapers on how to use it.

If they booked a room at your hotel, send them their confirmation email with a list of restaurants and things to do in the area. Include insider tips only locals know about.

#3: Newsletter Sign Up Confirmation Email

Don’t be the business who neglects to send a newsletter sign up confirmation. Many of your website visitors will be confused if you don’t.

Not only do these emails confirm their subscription, but this is your chance to let them know what to expect and to welcome them to your “family.”

Provide them a list of what you’ll send and when. Give them a brief overview of the types of information you’ll send.

If you offered them something special for joining your list, you want to provide it to them in this email.

#4: Cart Abandonment Email

Cart abandonment is one of the biggest challenges facing e-retailers today, as the average abandonment rate is nearly 70%.

The best way to encourage your customers to come back to your website and complete their purchase is with a transactional email.

Often, people who return to their carts spend more than they had originally planned.

The best time to send this email is within 24 hours of the abandoned cart. You can even include a special offer such as free shipping or 10% off to increase the odds they’ll finish their purchase.

Do put a time limit on the promo – a sense of urgency moves the process along.

#5: Birthday Email

These are easy emails to send and work to further customer loyalty by growing your customer base.

Provide a gift for your customer in this email. Think video, download or special.

#6: Customer Feedback Email

This email solicits feedback from your customer. Ask for comments on your products and services.

It lets your customers know you value their opinion.

#7: Reactivation Email

Send this email to subscribers who used to interact with you, but haven’t in a while. This email is the perfect vehicle to grow your customer base.

These emails keep your company top of mind and remind subscribers why they signed up in the first place.

To Conclude

We’ve looked at seven ways to grow your customer base with emails.

These emails are transactional emails, and they are key to your advanced email marketing strategy.

Why? Transactional emails are expected, and they encourage your users to take another action.

While some transactional emails are sent because of someone’s inaction, many more are sent because of their action.

Another word for transactional emails that grow your customer base is relationship-based emails. These emails have much higher open and click-thru rates. They also have greater revenue potential than regular emails.

It’s in your best interest to harness the power of the transactional email today. Increase your engagement opportunities with relationship-based emails and watch your customer base grow.

We’d like to leave you with one last tip. Ensure that every transactional email you send is optimized for mobile. The email must render as well on a smartphone or tablet as it does on a desktop or laptop computer.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by fine-tuning your landing pages to skyrocket growth among your email subscribers and current customers? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Alexandru Tudorache

The post 7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Introducing Dynamic Testing: the revolutionary way to test ecommerce experiences

You might think most marketing automation solutions feel like a black box. You’re not exactly sure what the software is doing or how it’s deciding which content to put in front of your customers. You might even feel like…

You might think most marketing automation solutions feel like a black box. You’re not exactly sure what the software is doing or how it’s deciding which content to put in front of your customers. You might even feel like...

Unbounce: How it Compares to Rivals Like Leadpages and Instapage

Creating high-impact landing pages are essential if you want better results from your online marketing efforts. And there are now many tools that help you quickly create high quality landing pages. But which landing page…

Unbounce versus Instapage and Leadpages

Creating high-impact landing pages are essential if you want better results from your online marketing efforts. And there are now many tools that help you quickly create high quality landing pages. But which landing page tool is best? There are now so many to choose from, each with different benefits.

To help you decide for yourself, I have compared and reviewed the three leading landing page tools – Unbounce, Instapage and LeadPages. I have created a comparison table including ratings for key aspects of the tools, listed the pros and cons of each, and who each tool is best for.

First of all, why use a landing page creation tool?

  • Lets you create high quality website pages quickly and easily without needing help from developers
  • Few design skills are needed as tools come with many stylish modern templates to choose from
  • You benefit from templates featuring best practices to convert more visitors into sales or leads

So now let’s move onto the actual ratings and comparisons for these major landing page creation tools. As you can see each has their own specific advantages and disadvantages:

unbounce logo instapage logo leadpages logo
Cost Plans from $79 a month for their ‘Essential’ level (500K visitors). Plans start from $68 a month for ‘Core’ level (200K visitors). Plans start from $25 a month for ‘Standard’ level (unlimited visitors).
Amount and quality of landing page templates
9/10 Great amount of templates (125+) and very high quality with built in conversion best practices. All are now mobile optimized. 9/10 Over 100 templates for all major categories like lead generation and webinars. Fairly good quality templates which are all mobile optimized. 7/10 The highest amount of templates offered, but many have extra cost to use. Varying quality of templates, but are all mobile optimized.
Ease of use of the page editor
8/10 Ease to use page editor. Advanced features are harder for beginners though. 8/10 Simple to use and intuitive editor menu system. Ideal for beginners. 8/10 Easy to use editor that is very intuitive and ideal for beginners.
Ability to customize pages
9/10 Excellent ability with full drag and drop options. Not limited to a grid system. 8/10 Good drag and drop functionality for customizing pages and CSS editing options. 5/10 Very limited page customization ability as it uses a rigid grid layout for editing.
Amount of landing page features
8/10 Great amount of features. Includes new ‘convertables’ popups and sticky bars. 8/10 Good amount of features. Lacks popups, but includes good countdown timers and multi-step forms. 9/10 Highest amount of features and includes variety of popup and exit intent options.
Landing page hosting and tool integration options 9/10 Pages hosted on their servers or on WordPress. Great tool integration options including most email marketing tools and Google Analytics. 9/10 Pages hosted on most websites including WordPress, and an option to host on their servers. Good amount of tool integrations. 9/10 Pages hosted on most types of website including WordPress or their servers. Good amount of tool integration options.
Analytics and reporting options
8/10 Simple reporting of traffic and conversions, with good option to get traffic and conversion reports by email. 9/10 Excellent reporting functionality and conversion tracking, now with click heatmaps on premium plans. 8/10 Good reporting and graph options make it easy to understand traffic and conversions.
A/B testing options
8/10 Good A/B testing options, with easy ability to create multiple variations. 6/10 A/B testing available but not included in the basic plan level. 6/10 A/B testing available but also not included in the basic plan level.
Popup lead generation options
9/10 Has great new ‘convertables’ popups for lead generation including exit intent. 0/10 No popup options included (I suggest using a tool like Optin Monster in addition). 9/10 Strong emphasis on popups with their excellent ‘Lead Boxes’ feature.
Support options
9/10 Phone, email and live chat support at all plan levels. Great coaching included in enterprise level. 7/10 Varies by plan. Email support only at lowest plan. Phone support only offered in highest level plan. 7/10 Varies by plan. Email support only at lowest plan. Phone support only offered in highest level plan.
Overall rating 9/10 Has the best page editing options and flexibility. Definitely the best option for experts and marketing teams. 9/10 Great all-around tool and at a great price. Reasonable editor with good features, for beginners and experts. 8/10 Lowest cost and great popup options, but page editor gives least flexibility. Better suited for beginners.
Free trial? Get a 30-day free trial of Unbounce Get a 30-day free trial of Instapage No free trial, but has money back guarantee

 

As you can see from the comparison table, all three tools have high ratings, so now let’s explore in more detail. Here are the pros and cons of each tool, and then which type of user each tool is ideal for.

Unbounce Overview

Overall an excellent choice, ideal for marketers who want to get the most flexibility for creating pages. Comes at higher cost than the other landing page tools though.

unbounce editor screenshot

Unbounce Pros:

  • Has the most flexible editor which is not restricted to a grid system like LeadPages uses
  • New ‘convertables’ feature for lead generation is great with many popup types
  • Great high quality templates with many conversion best practices built in
  • Has dynamic keyword replacement for getting better results from PPC campaigns
  • Offers the best support options even at the lowest plan level, including phone support

Unbounce Cons:

  • Most expensive tool and gets more expensive with high traffic levels (over 5,000 visitors per month)
  • Doesn’t offer as many features as the other tools e.g. lacks countdown timer
  • Beginners may prefer other landing page tools that have a simpler grid editing system

Rating on G2Crowd: 4.4/5 (as of December 2017)

Try the tool for yourself: Get a free 30 day trial of Unbounce

Instapage Overview

Overall a great landing page tool for beginners and experts, with good options (apart from offering no popups though), a simple to use editor, and at a great low cost.

instapage screenshot

Instapage Pros:

  • The highest amount of templates included with fairly good quality
  • Has one of the easiest to use editors for customizing pages, great for beginners
  • Very easy to setup and integrate with WordPress and other common tools
  • Offers great built-in click heatmaps on their premium plans

Instapage Cons:

  • No popup functionality included, unlike the other tools reviewed
  • The ability to do A/B testing is not available in the lowest plan level
  • The editor could offer more customization options, not as good as Unbounce

Rating on G2Crowd: 4.7/5 (as of December 2017)

Try the tool for yourself: Get a free 30 day trial of Instapage

Leadpages Overview

The lowest cost option and great for beginners wanting to create pages quickly, although has the poorest flexibility to customize pages out of all the tools.

leadpages screenshot

Leadpages Pros:

  • Excellent popup functionality with their Lead Boxes feature, great for lead capture
  • Offer the lowest monthly plan for creating landing pages ($25)
  • Good amount of templates that don’t need much customization
  • They offer the biggest template marketplace if you want to buy versus create

Leadpages Cons:

  • Poorest page customization options out of all tools, restricted to a fixed grid layout
  • They don’t offer the ability to start from a blank page, you must start from a template
  • Many of their templates look very average or have become too commonly used
  • They don’t offer a free 30 day trial like the other tools offer

Rating on G2Crowd: 4.1/5 (as of December 2017)

Try the tool for yourself: No free trial, but they offer a money back guarantee

So which landing page tool is better?

As you can see, all three tools rate well for creating landing pages. Each have different strengths and weaknesses which will be more important to different types of users. To help you understand which is better for your needs, here are the main tool differences and who each is ideal for:

  • Use Unbounce if you want the most flexibility when creating pages and want the most customization options. Ideal for experienced online marketers with advanced needs for landing pages.
  • Use Instapage if you want a good overall tool for creating and editing landing pages at a reasonable cost. Ideal for online marketers who have moderate landing page needs.
  • Use LeadPages if you are beginner or want landing simple pages, and don’t want many customization options. Ideal for entrepreneurs who want to create simple landing pages quickly.

So which tool you should chose really depends on what your needs are for creating landing pages. Personally I use Unbounce for creating my landing pages as I prefer greater editing options and flexibility. I suggest you check out Unbounce and Instapage and see for yourself as they both offer a 30 day free trial.

Other landing page tools worth checking out

I reviewed and compared the 3 most popular landing page creation tools. There are some other good options you can consider though, and each have their own strengths:

  • OptimizePress – a landing page WordPress plugin, ideal if you don’t want to pay monthly
  • LanderApp – one of the lowest cost and better landing page tools to appear recently
  • KickOffLabs – growing fast and includes unique email marketing and contest features

Wrapping up

That is my expert 2 cents for the best landing page tools. Now over to you – which is your favorite tool for creating landing pages? Please comment below. Thanks!

The Hotjar Guide for Improving Your Website Sales or Leads

You may have already heard of this relatively new website tool called Hotjar, it’s quickly become one of the most popular tools for improving websites. They now have over 200,000 online businesses signed up! So…

hotjar website improving guide

You may have already heard of this relatively new website tool called Hotjar, it’s quickly become one of the most popular tools for improving websites. They now have over 200,000 online businesses signed up!

So what is Hotjar? Well, it’s a really powerful 8-in-1 analytics and visitor feedback tool that reveals exactly what your visitors think of your website, including the most common issues they have, and what they like the most about it.

This isn’t just any ordinary website tool though – the unique combination of 8 features it offers give excellent insights for improving your website, but only if you know the best ways to use it. Most people don’t know this though, so that’s why I have created this in-depth guide to help you maximize the true potential of this tool and transform the amount of sales or leads coming from your website.

hotjar screenshot

This Hotjar guide really helps with the most important part of CRO – conversion research, and you can use it to improve any kind of website, from ecommerce websites to startup websites. It’s a pretty long guide, so for easier navigation I have included links for the main contents:

Part 1: Collect website visitor research using Hotjar
Part 2: Look for insights from Hotjar findings
Part 3: Create and launch high-impact improvement ideas

A quick overview of the 8 tools included with Hotjar:

Before we get into details of how to use Hotjar for greatest success, I thought it would be good to give a quick overview of the main features of the tool and their benefits.

1: Visitor clickmaps: Much like CrazyEgg offers, these heatmaps let you see exactly what your visitors are clicking on (and is often quite different than you may expect). These give you great insights for knowing which elements on your pages need improving most or making more or less prominent.

2: Visitor recordings: These let you discover exactly what visitors do on your website, including mouse movements and how far they scroll. The recordings are often very revealing, and help you understand which parts of your website that visitors are most often having problems with, and their typical journey.

3: Feedback polls: This polls feature is similar to the Qualaroo tool, and takes the form of a single question in the bottom right corner of your website. This is one of the most simple yet powerful parts of the tool, and is excellent for gathering very insightful quick feedback on specific pages of your website.

4: Form analytics: Google Analytics can’t easily help you with this part – this feature reveals exactly which fields on your forms that visitors most often abandon on. Very important for using on your sign-up forms and checkout pages, the insights from this are vital for improving completion rates of your forms.

5: Funnel analytics: This feature helps you understand exactly how well your checkout or signup flows are performing, and the drop off rate of your visitors between each page of the flow. This helps you discover which pages in your funnel need improving first.

6: Visitor Surveys: It also includes a survey tool every bit as good as SurveyMonkey.com. Use it to find out in-depth feedback from your visitors, and exactly what they think of your website content and your offerings, and get feedback on how they would improve it.

7: Incoming Feedback: This simple but effective tool allows visitors to leave ratings of your pages and website elements, and allows them to easily take and send screenshots of what they are having issues with or what they are loving.

8: User feedback recruitment: This helps you find participants for doing website usability and user research. I won’t be focusing on this in this guide though, as you need additional tools to run the usability research (like UserTesting.com).

Part one: Collect website visitor research using Hotjar

Time required for this part: You will need a few hours to setup each feature, and then will need to wait several days for responses (depending on how much traffic you have).

New to Hotjar? You will of course first need to create a Hotjar account if you haven’t already done so. They offer a free basic plan, so I suggest you try that first. Then you need to add the tracking code which is very simple – they have install guides for each website platform too.

This setup and collecting research part if vital, and there are many things to ensure you do, particularly for the poll and survey features. Don’t rush into using Hotjar out of excitement or you won’t spend enough time setting it up to maximize your website insights.

1: Turn on heatmaps for your key website pages.

The first thing you need to setup are heatmaps. These help you understand exactly what your visitors are clicking on your website. And it’s often different than what you might expect!

It’s really easy to turn on heatmaps, but don’t just turn them on for your homepage and a few other pages, you need to determine your most important pages to turn them on for. This should be your key pages and ones relating to your website goals, like your product or service pages, and your checkout or signup flow. You should also create them for your top entry pages, as these get seen very often and visitors will often judge your whole website based on them.

hotjar heatmpap setup

You will need at least 500 views per heatmap that you create so you get a representative sample to review and gain insights from – the more views the better.

2: Turn on the visitor recordings feature.

Next you need to turn on the visitor recording feature. This lets you start gaining excellent insights by watching your visitors website journey and most common issues that you will need to fix and improve.

To get these recordings started, click ‘Record visitors’ on the recordings section of the tool and it will begin to record your visitors on your whole website – there is no need to pick specific pages. There are a few extra options, but I suggest you leave the default options on, and you can limit the recordings to specific pages if you have a pro level account.

hotjar record visitors setup

Ideally you need at least 50 recordings to review and gain insights from, and at least 20 that involve multiple page flows to get a good understanding of your visitors common whole journey.

I asked a Hotjar expert for some of his words advice on recordings, Joris Byron:

Joris Bryon, CRO Expert at Yorro.co
“My #1 tip for Hotjar: Don’t use visitor recordings unless you know what you’re looking for. If you don’t know what you’re looking for you’ll be watching hours of videos and you won’t get any wiser. For example: in GA you see a huge dropoff on the form in your checkout. Start recording the visits to that page and see what people are doing on that specific page. Only record the sessions with visits to that page. That way you won’t ‘waste’ visitor recordings on sessions that are at that point irrelevant for your analysis. By focusing your visitor recordings on the sessions that matter, you’ll save a lot of time and you’ll learn a lot more than just randomly recording and watching sessions.”

3: Create a feedback poll for each of your key pages.

This poll feature is one of the best ways to gain feedback, but if you don’t ask a good enough question or don’t choose the right page to ask it on, you won’t get very good insights. The key is to ask relevant questions for each of your key pages that provide you actionable insights – not just yes/no or generic questions. For example, if you have a prices or plans page, ask a question for gaining feedback about your pricing, like whether pricing seems reasonable or plan differences are easy to understand.

You will get better insights running polls on pages relating to your website goals, and work very well on features pages, product pages, sales pages, pricing pages and signup pages. Homepages don’t work as well, as visitors often don’t know enough about what you offer to give feedback at that point in their journey.

When you create these polls, the most important options are choosing the page to target, the type of poll (multiple choice or long text answers work well), giving visitors the choice to get a response, choosing 20 seconds for the trigger behavior for the poll (sooner and you risk annoying visitors) and most importantly, choosing a question to ask. You can actually ask more than 1 question and use logic to show a related question next that relates to their answer  – this helps you get more detailed feedback.

Hotjar poll setup

Here are some great poll questions for gaining better insights on your key pages:

– Is there anything stopping you from purchasing today?

– Which elements look most and least appealing?

– Is there anything you don’t understand?

– What do you think of the pricing of our service/product?

– Would a free trial or guarantee compel them to try it?

– What else could be added to make our service more appealing?

You should aim to collect at least 50 responses for each page poll that you are running. Any less and you may not get a representative sample to gain insights from.

4: Create a survey for in-depth general website feedback

This survey feature is excellent for gaining more indepth general visitor insights about your website, and complements feedback gathered by poll insights. So go ahead and setup a survey of less than 10 questions (any more and you will get lower completion rates). While setting it up, use the option to popup the survey on your website, but choose the trigger option to wait at least 60 seconds after visitors arrive or after a few page views, or you risk annoying them.

Hotjar survey setup

To get more responses I also suggest you offer an incentive for visitors to complete your surveys (like a discount or free months access to what you are offering).

The key is don’t just ask questions about your product/service and visitor demographics, the survey questions should be more focused on the actual website experience. Here are some good questions to use to gain excellent insights for improving your website:

– What was the main reason you came to this website today?

– Did you find what you are looking for? If not, why not?

– What features of our website and offering did you find most appealing?

– What do you feel could be improved on our website?

– Have you visited other similar websites? Did you prefer anything on them?

– What do you think of the shipping and delivery options?

– What are the biggest factors that influence your decision to purchase?

How easy was it to use our website? Did you find anything difficult?

You will need at least 50 responses to analyze in phase 2. This should be quite achievable depending on your traffic levels. To gain more responses I suggest you create an additional survey customized just for your existing customers and send that out via email.

5: Setup a funnel analysis for your checkout or signup page

Next turn on the funnels feature for your most important flow of pages like your checkout or signup set of pages. Setting up this funnel helps you discover at which pages that visitors most often drop out from – indicating issues and potential for improvement. E.g you may find that your billing page has a very high drop off rate.

Setting up this funnel is easy and works much like creating a goal in Google Analytics. Just click ‘new funnel’ and enter names for each step and the corresponding page URL structure. You should set this up for your main conversion funnel like a checkout or signup flow, but also for most common visitor funnels that go back earlier in the visitor journey, for example from the homepage to the features page, to the sign-up page.

hotjar funnel setup

Ideally you need in the very least 100 funnel visitor sessions to start gaining insights from.

6: Setup form analysis for your important forms or single page checkout

This last step is optional depending on whether you have long forms on your website – for example a sign-up form or a single page checkout. This form analytics feature of Hotjar lets you discover which fields on your forms that visitors abandon the most, and is something you can’t actually do with Google Analytics. For example, you may find out that people are confused about one of the questions you are asking in the signup form, or don’t like giving the answer to one of your personal information questions.

This is also easy to setup. For every form you want to track, just click ‘new form’ and then enter the page URL that contains the form you want to analyze. Then you confirm which fields in the form that you want to track. You will need at least 100 form views to start getting reliable insights.

hotjar form setup

Note: I haven’t mentioned turning on the last feature of the tool, user feedback recruitment, as you actually need other tools like Usertesting.com to be able to setup and analyze the actual user feedback. This part of the tool just helps you find people to recruit.

Part two: Look for insights from Hotjar findings

Time required for this part: This is the most important part, and you ideally need to spend at least 4 hours reviewing the results from each part of the tool you setup.

In this essential part you gather insights and website improvement ideas from each area of Hotjar that you just setup. Gathering these insights is the important conversion research part of CRO, and doing this leads to better understanding of your visitors and their needs, and therefore better website improvement ideas.

If you don’t spend adequate time reviewing findings and creating insights then you won’t get very good website improvement ideas. Here are the main insights to look for when analyzing your findings:

1: Review the heatmaps for key pages. First you need to gain good insights from the heatmaps which will help you create ideas to improve your website.  Here are some key things to consider when reviewing heatmaps for each of your key pages:

  • Are visitors clicking or looking at parts of your page that you would expect?
  • Are any elements being ignored that are important to your goals and need promoting better?
  • What links in the navigation are clicked most or least? This gives you a great idea of visitor intent and for optimizing menu contents.
  • Is anything being clicked on more than your main CTA buttons? This may indicate confusion or non engaging CTA wording.
  • Are visitors not scrolling far down your pages and often not seeing key content?

The goal is to create at least 10 heatmap insights you can use to improve your website sales or leads.

hotjar heatmap

2: Review the visitor session recordings. Next you need to start watching recordings of your visitors on your website. But to get the most insights from them you have to know what to look for – and not just watch them all as this can be very time consuming. Here are some best practices to help you:

  • Review recordings from your most important pages first – your homepage, your product or service pages, and your signup/checkout flow. You can setup filters to only see these.
  • Watch at least 10 videos for each key page to get a feel for how users interact with each of them.
  • Look for which parts of the pages visitors seem to get stuck on or don’t seem to notice.
  • Look how often visitors click the back button or go the previous page, as this can indicate confusion.
  • Look for any small errors or usability issues that you may not have noticed before.
  • Review recordings on mobile devices too – these are really important for gaining insights into your mobile visitors and their challenges.
  • When reviewing each video, use the tag feature for recordings using words that help you summarize what happens (checkout issue, confused, purchaser etc).
  • If you have a pro account, use the notes feature to comment on specific points of the session replay. This makes it much easier to keep track of insights

Using these tips be sure to create at least 10 insights as you review your visitor session recordings.

hotjar visitor recording

3: Review your poll visitor responses. After you have got enough responses to each of your polls you need to start looking for insights from the feedback you have received. Here are the most important things to do to maximize your insights:

  • See which type of feedback response is most common if you are using multiple choice answers. The results graph lets you quickly see the most common responses.
  • For open response questions, use the ‘word cloud’ results option look for common words so you can see patterns for what visitors are giving feedback most often about.
  • If you haven’t got much feedback that is useful, consider changing your question to be more specific or change the topic slightly.
  • Based on the feedback you have received, consider creating follow up polls to dig a little deeper into most common responses.

The goal is to create at least 10 website improvement insights based on feedback from your visitor polls.

Signup to Hotjar for free and start using this guide on your website
Ready to get started improving your website? Get your free Hotjar basic plan now

4: Review your visitor survey responses. Next you need to analyze the feedback you get from the surveys you created. To help you create better website improvement insights, here are some of the key things to consider when reviewing your responses:

  • Discover the most common answers for each of your questions and look for most common patterns.
  • Understand which parts of your website they think need improving the most.
  • Understand visitor’s purchase motivations – do you give them enough information to purchase?
  • Discover visitor’s major issues using your website, and what they had most trouble finding or doing.
  • Learn which competitors they like using, and reasons why. What is lacking on your website in comparison to them?

Create at least 10 insights from the survey feedback that will help you improve your website.

5: Review your funnel report. After you have enough visitors to your funnel you need to look for insights into how these key pages are performing. Here are some key things to look for to improve your insights:

  • Check which page of the funnel has the highest drop off percentage – come up with insights why this might be.
  • Any page with over 50% drop off rate is high and you should create insights for improving these pages.
  • Look at the visitor recordings and heatmaps for each of the pages with highest drop off to help you come up with insights for improving these pages.
  • Setup a poll for any of the pages that have high drop pages (if you haven’t already done so previously).
  • Look for the total conversion rate at the top of each funnel report. If this is for your checkout or signup flow of pages, anything lower than 30% conversion rate is below average and means you have big room for improvement (this is because the average shopping cart abandonment rate is 68%).

The goal is to create at least 10 insights from the funnel report to help you improve your website.

hotjar funnel report

6: Review your forms reports. If you setup a form to analyze you should next analyze the results from this and create insights to improve your forms. these are some of the most important things to look for while reviewing the report:

  • Check which form field has the highest drop off percentage, and think of reasons causing this.
  • Are any of your form fields confusing that might be leading to higher drop off rates?
  • Do you really need to ask for personal information in your fields? This lowers completion rates.
  • Do you need to make all of your form fields mandatory? Can you make some non-mandatory?
  • Watch recordings of visitors completing your forms to see if you can get additional insights.
  • How good are your error validation messages? This is important to improve to reduce form exits.

From the form report try to come up with as many insights as possible to improve your key forms.

hotjar form report

Note: In addition to these Hotjar tool insights, it’s also essential to look at your Google Analytics reports to find additional insights like the bounce rate and conversion rate for your key pages. You should also run usability tests using a tool like Usertesting.com to gain additional feedback and gain insights from that too.

Part three: Create and launch high-impact improvement ideas

Time required for this part: You should spend at least 3 hours creating ideas based on insights, ideally brainstorming with other team members.

This is where things get exciting and you start to launch website improvements based on the insights you have gathered using Hotjar. But to ensure greatest chances of increasing your website sales or leads, you need to know how to best turn the insights into ideas, and know what to launch first for biggest impact.

1: Turn your insights into improvement ideas.

Now that you have created some excellent insights from your findings in part two, next you need to turn these into ideas for website improvement and A/B test ideas (if you have enough traffic). To help you prioritize, here are the key things you need to list for each idea:

  • A short descriptive name for your improvement idea.
  • A hypothesis and insight for each idea (the reason why you think it will have a good impact).
  • List the page or page element that will be improved for each idea.
  • Estimate the likely impact the idea would have on increasing conversions and sales (ranked 1 to 10, with 10 being highest potential).
  • List how much traffic each page gets relating to each idea – the more the better (ranked 1 to 10, with 10 being highest traffic).
  • Estimate how easy the idea would be to launch in terms of design and development (rank 1 to 10, with 10 being easiest).

To help list and store these extra details for each idea you should create a spreadsheet. This is perfect for sharing easily with other key people in your business like your marketing, web design and development teams that will be working on the improvements. Here is a sample of the one that use:

website improvement idea prioritizer

2: Prioritize the improvement ideas based on highest impact.

Rather than guess at what improvement or test idea to launch first on your website (which can lead to varying success), with the information you listed for each idea you can now prioritize and determine the ones that will maximize your chances of increasing your website sales or leads.

To do this prioritization, on your ideas sheet simply sort the likely impact column to show highest rated ones first. Then look for the ideas towards the top that have the highest ease of launch rating – these are going to give you the quickest and biggest impact on improving your website. These easier to change high impact ideas are known as low hanging fruit, and typically will involve changing simple things on key pages like headlines and call-to-action buttons.

3: Start launching highest potential ideas first, and progress through the list.

Once you have determined the improvement ideas that will likely have biggest impact and easiest to implement, start launching the ideas one at time. You will often need to get your website designer and developer to help create the visuals and code. Don’t forget to get help from the marketing team to help you writing better headlines, wording and call-to-actions too.

For each improvement you launch, monitor the impact on your key metrics in your Google Analytics reports, both for the page you are trying to improve (lower exit rate and higher conversion rate) and for your website as a whole (increased website conversion rate and improved shopping cart/signup abandonment rates).

Ideally you should A/B test a few variations for each improvement idea as this helps you experiment and find the best performing variation for your ideas. For low traffic pages this A/B testing may not be possible though – this guide will help you if you low traffic.

After you have launched about 5 improvements to your website, you should start to see some great impact on increased conversion rates, sales or leads. Don’t stop there though, keep working through the list until you have launched all of the ideas you created.

Wrapping up

Using Hotjar and this guide should really help improve your website sales or leads, and ideally you should repeat this improvement process at least one a year on your website, and definitely when you have just changed major elements on your website.

Now over to you – have you started using Hotjar on your website yet? Had any great success using it so far?

The Universal Analytics Command Queue

For those of you who remember Google Analytics classic, the next four characters I write after this sentence should ring with nostalgia:

_gaq

_gaq is the name of the global variable that Google Analytics would install when it was executed on a page. The _gaq variable was defined (initially) as an Array. The default snippet had it right at the top:

<script type="text/javascript">
  var _gaq = _gaq || [];
  _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-XXXXX-X']);
  _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);

  (function() {
      var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
      ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
      var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
  })();
</script>

The _gaq array was a command queue for things we wanted Google Analytics to do. The default snippet passed it some stuff right away – specifically, it passed in the instructions to create a tracker and fire a pageview. This pattern was really cool – it allowed for commands to be registered in-line while the browser was busy fetching Google Analytics and was the backbone of GA’s transition to asynchronous loading. No messy callbacks, no need to check if _gaq was defined; once Google Analytics loaded, each command would be executed in the order it appeared in the queue.

Another part of what made this exciting was that non-GA functions could also use the queue, and Google Analytics would call them for us. This allowed for clever folks to push in commands to run before Google Analytics did its tracker creation; for example, if I wanted to fire a callback function when Google Analytics loaded, I could do this:

var _gaq = window._gaq = window._gaq || [];

_gaq.push(function() {
  notifyGALoaded();
});

The first thing GA would do after it finished loading and bootstrapping itself would be to call my function, which would call notifyGALoaded, in turn. I could be comfortable adding this code anywhere, because GA would inherit any existing _gaq values non-destructively. This meant the .push() method always would work.

Then Universal Analytics came along and ruined everything – the new syntax didn’t use the familiar .push() syntax, and instead opted for commands to be pushed in as arguments to the function ga.

Getting Back Our Queue with the Alternative Syntax

Deep in the bowels of the Universal Analytics documentation, there’s an article that describes an alternative syntax for loading Google Analytics. We can use the first part of this snippet to get back our command queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

This snippet instantiates our ga global and configures the internal command queue for us. Now we can go right back to adding commands into our queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Do some stuff
});

Just like with our old _gaq Array, we needn’t be concerned about detechting when Google Analytics loads or accidentially overwriting the existing global.

So…?

You might be thinking “So, what? When would I need that anyways?”. Imagine you’re providing code to a 3rd party, and they want to dictate whether Google Analytics loads or not. You know Google Analytics may load, but you don’t want to force it to load if it doesn’t, and you don’t want to poll every n milliseconds to see if it has loaded. Now you can just instantiate the queue, push in your commands, and carry on worry-free.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;
ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXX-YY', ...)
// etc

You also may want to have code execute only after Google Analytics has loaded. Using this syntax, you can instantiate ga, push in your command, and be guaranteed that it will execute only after Google Analytics has loaded.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Some code I'd like to fire
});

This simple interface provides a really simple way to queue up commands before and after the Google Analytics library loads. How will you use it? Drop me a line or on Twitter.

For those of you who remember Google Analytics classic, the next four characters I write after this sentence should ring with nostalgia:

_gaq

_gaq is the name of the global variable that Google Analytics would install when it was executed on a page. The _gaq variable was defined (initially) as an Array. The default snippet had it right at the top:

<script type="text/javascript">
  var _gaq = _gaq || [];
  _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-XXXXX-X']);
  _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);

  (function() {
      var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
      ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
      var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
  })();
</script>

The _gaq array was a command queue for things we wanted Google Analytics to do. The default snippet passed it some stuff right away - specifically, it passed in the instructions to create a tracker and fire a pageview. This pattern was really cool - it allowed for commands to be registered in-line while the browser was busy fetching Google Analytics and was the backbone of GA's transition to asynchronous loading. No messy callbacks, no need to check if _gaq was defined; once Google Analytics loaded, each command would be executed in the order it appeared in the queue.

Another part of what made this exciting was that non-GA functions could also use the queue, and Google Analytics would call them for us. This allowed for clever folks to push in commands to run before Google Analytics did its tracker creation; for example, if I wanted to fire a callback function when Google Analytics loaded, I could do this:

var _gaq = window._gaq = window._gaq || [];

_gaq.push(function() {
  notifyGALoaded();
});

The first thing GA would do after it finished loading and bootstrapping itself would be to call my function, which would call notifyGALoaded, in turn. I could be comfortable adding this code anywhere, because GA would inherit any existing _gaq values non-destructively. This meant the .push() method always would work.

Then Universal Analytics came along and ruined everything - the new syntax didn't use the familiar .push() syntax, and instead opted for commands to be pushed in as arguments to the function ga.

Getting Back Our Queue with the Alternative Syntax

Deep in the bowels of the Universal Analytics documentation, there's an article that describes an alternative syntax for loading Google Analytics. We can use the first part of this snippet to get back our command queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

This snippet instantiates our ga global and configures the internal command queue for us. Now we can go right back to adding commands into our queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Do some stuff
});

Just like with our old _gaq Array, we needn't be concerned about detechting when Google Analytics loads or accidentially overwriting the existing global.

So...?

You might be thinking "So, what? When would I need that anyways?". Imagine you're providing code to a 3rd party, and they want to dictate whether Google Analytics loads or not. You know Google Analytics may load, but you don't want to force it to load if it doesn't, and you don't want to poll every n milliseconds to see if it has loaded. Now you can just instantiate the queue, push in your commands, and carry on worry-free.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;
ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXX-YY', ...)
// etc

You also may want to have code execute only after Google Analytics has loaded. Using this syntax, you can instantiate ga, push in your command, and be guaranteed that it will execute only after Google Analytics has loaded.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Some code I'd like to fire
});

This simple interface provides a really simple way to queue up commands before and after the Google Analytics library loads. How will you use it? Drop me a line or on Twitter.

What to Do When Your A/B Test Doesn’t Win: The Essential Checklist

Unless you are an A/B testing and CRO expert, did you realize that most of your A/B test results won’t get a winning result? You may have even experienced this disappointment yourself if you’ve tried…

better AB test results

Unless you are an A/B testing and CRO expert, did you realize that most of your A/B test results won’t get a winning result? You may have even experienced this disappointment yourself if you’ve tried A/B testing.

Some good news though. You can actually do something with these inconclusive A/B tests and turn them into better tests with a much greater chance of succeeding – therefore increasing your website sales or leads without needing more traffic.

Instead of simply throwing away losing A/B tests and hoping to get luckier with your next one, you have a fantastic learning opportunity to take advantage of – that most online businesses don’t know about or do well. But what should do first? And what mistakes should watch out for?

To help you ensure you succeed and maximize your learnings, I’ve put together a handy checklist for you. But before I reveal how to maximize your A/B test learnings and future results, let’s set the scene a bit…

First of all, just how many A/B tests fail to get a winning result?

A VWO study found only 1 out 7 A/B tests have winning results. That’s just 14%. Not exactly great, right?

Even a leading agency that helps run many A/B tests found quite disappointing numbers – a study by Experiment Engine revealed only 50% of tests drove a winning result. Even the best CRO agencies only claim a 70-80% success rate, so even they experience many failed test results.

Many online businesses are talking about disappointing A/B testing results too. While they sometimes got very impressive results, Appsumo.com revealed just 1 out of 8 of their tests drove significant change.

This real lack of winning results can often cause frustration and slow progress with A/B testing efforts, and limit further interest and budget in doing CRO. Very frustrating! While A/B testing is only just a part of successful CRO (web analytics, usability and visitor feedback are also essential), you can actually gain real value from failed results, as I will now reveal in the learnings checklist.

The A/B Test Learnings Checklist

1: Did you create a good clear hypothesis for your A/B test?

One of the most common reason causing inconclusive A/B test results is due to the idea behind it being poor – the hypothesis of why the element or page was tested. This is because businesses often just guess at what to test, with no clear strong hypothesis for each test idea. And without a clear hypothesis, you will find it hard to learn if the test fails – you won’t really know what you were trying to achieve or why.

So first check how good your A/B test hypothesis was – in particular, what was the proof the page or element was a problem or opportunity? If you think it was poor or didn’t even have one, you really need to create a better test idea hypothesis – looking at key web analytics reports or getting expert test ideas is a great place to start.

This high importance of a strong A/B test hypothesis is echoed by a leading CRO expert, Joris Byron:

Joris Bryon, CRO Expert at Yorro.co
“The best way to learn from failed tests is to have a clear hypothesis. I see it happening all the time. If you have a clear hypothesis, but your variation doesn’t win, then at least you’ve learned that what you thought was a problem, clearly isn’t. So you can move on to other different things to test.

One nuance though: if your variation didn’t win that doesn’t always mean your hypothesis was wrong. If your research shows great support for your hypothesis, look at your variation. Maybe it wasn’t bold enough. Then test again, with the same hypothesis but with a bolder variation.”

2: Did you wait a full 7 days before declaring a result and did you change anything major?

A simple yet common mistake with A/B testing is declaring a losing result too soon. This is particularly problematic if you have a lot of traffic and are keen to find a result quickly. Or worst still, the person doing the test is biased and waits until their least favorite variation starts to lose declares the test a loss.

To avoid this mistake, you need to wait at least a week before declaring a result to allow fluctuations in variation results to level off and to also reduce the impact of differences in traffic by day.

And any time you change anything major on your website while a test is running you also need to wait at least an additional 7 days. This extra time is needed for your testing tool to evaluate the impact of this new change (this is also known as test pollution).

If you find this is the case with your failed test, then I suggest you re-run the test again for a longer period, and try not to change anything major during the period you are running the test.

3: Were the differences between variations bold enough to be easily noticed by visitors?

Next you need to check the variations that were created for the test and see if they were really that different for visitors to notice in the first place. If your variations were subtle, like small changes in images or wording, visitors often won’t notice, or act any different, therefore you often won’t see a winning test result. I’ve seen hundreds of A/B tests created by businesses and you will be surprised at how often this mistake occurs.

If you think this may have occurred with your losing test result, re-rest it but this time make sure you think outside of the box and create at least one bolder variations. Involving other team members can help you brainstorm ideas – marketing experts are helpful here.                                               

4: Did you review click map and visitor recordings for insights about the page tested?

It’s essential to do visual analysis of how visitors interact on every page you want to improve and run an A/B test on. This helps you visually understand what elements are being engaged with the most or least. This visual analysis is particularly important to double check for pages and elements that relate to your failed A/B tests – you can learn a lot from this. Did your visitors even notice the element you were testing?

The first type of visual analysis are visitor clickmaps that show you heatmaps of what your visitors are clicking on, and how far your visitors scroll down your pages. Even more important are visitor session recordings where you can watch visitors exact mouse movements and journey through your website.

hotjar heatmap

So if you hadn’t done this visual analysis for the page relating to the inconclusive test, go ahead and do this now using a tool like Hotjar.com. You may realize that few people are interacting with the element you are testing or that they are getting stuck or confused with something else on the page that you should run an A/B test on instead.

5: Have you performed usability testing on the page being tested, including the new variation?

Usability testing is another essential piece of successful CRO – getting feedback from your target audience is one of the best ways of generating ideas for improvements and A/B test ideas. This should also be performed in advance for your whole website and before any major changes launch.

Therefore, I suggest you run usability testing on the page relating to your losing A/B test result to improve your learnings. In particular, I suggest you use UserTesting.com to ask for feedback on each of the versions and elements you tested. Ask what they liked most or least, and ask what else they think is lacking or could be improved – this really is excellent for creating better follow up test ideas.

I asked Justin Rondeau for his A/B test learning advice – he’s seen a huge amount of A/B test results:

Justin Rondeau, DigitalMarketer.com
First things first is to look at your segments (if you have the traffic) to see if the losing variation had a positive impact on any segment of visitors.

Another thing I’ll do is retest that same element but with a different approach. If I see that this test doesn’t move the needle, then the element in question likely isn’t important to the visitor.

Finally, if I don’t have the time to run the ‘exploration’ style test above – I’d dig into some qualitative data. First I’d look at the clickmap of the page, then if the page is important enough run it through an actual eyetracking lab to see if they comprehend what you are trying to improve.”

6: Did you segment your test results by key visitor groups to find potential winners?

A simple way to look for learnings and possibly even uncover a winning test result is to segment your A/B test results for key visitor groups. For example you may find that your new visitors or paid search segment actually generated a winning result which you should push live. Ideally you want to setup segments for each of your key visitor groups and analyze those – you can usually setup A/B testing tool integrations with Google Analytics to make this much easier.

To go one step further, you can actually analyze each of your test variations in Google Analytics to understand differences in user behavior for each test variation and look for more learnings. A web analyst is very helpful for this. You can setup this integration quite easily in major A/B testing tools like Optimizely.

7: How good was the copy used in the test? Was it action or benefit based?

You may have had a great idea for an A/B test, but how good and engaging was the copy used in the test? Did it really captivate your visitors? This is essential to spend time on as headlines and copy can often have some of the biggest impacts on conversion rates. So if you had changed text in your test result that didn’t win, really ask yourself how good the copy was. For better follow-up test wording, always try testing variations that mention benefits, solving common pain points, and use action related wording.

Most people aren’t great at copywriting, so I suggest you get some help with this from someone in your marketing department or get help from a CRO expert like myself or a copywriting expert like Joanna Wiebe.

I asked Claire Vo for her thoughts – she’s seen 1000’s of tests as the founder of ExperimentEngine.com

Claire Vo, Founder of Experiment Engine
It depends how you’re defining a “failed” test. If it is a conversion rate loss, then you’ve identified that the elements changed in the test are “sensitive areas” that contribute quite a bit to your conversions. This is a great clue into what can help conversions – see what in this sensitive area changed in the test. Did you deemphasize something? Change a value proposition? These also offer great hints at what is important to users, and you can use these hints to create future tests that maximize what the original is doing well.

If a test is flat, that is again, a clue. Maybe the area you were focused does not matter that much for conversions. If you can pair this against other analytics (heat maps, click funnels, etc.) you can further refine where on a page or site you should focus your conversion efforts. Every test is a learning experience, and each round, win or loss, brings you closer to finding what matters to your users in the conversion funnel.”

8: Did you consider previous steps in the journey – what might need optimizing first?

Another key learning is to understand the whole visitor journey and look at the bigger website experience for your A/B test idea that didn’t win, and not just look for learnings in isolation to the page you were testing.

This is important because if you haven’t optimized your top entry pages first, you will have limited success on pages further down like the funnel like your checkout. So go ahead and find the most common previous page relating to your failed A/B test, and see if anything needs clarifying or improving that relates to the page you are trying to test. For example, if you were testing adding benefits in the checkout, did you test the prominence of these on previous pages?

9: Did you review the test result with a wider audience and brainstorm for ideas?

To increase learnings from your A/B tests, when looking at results you should always get regular feedback and thoughts from key people in related teams like marketing and user experience, at least once per quarter. Creative and design orientated people are ideal for helping improve A/B testing ideas.

And this wider internal feedback is even more important to get when A/B tests don’t get a winning result. So I suggest you setup a meeting to review all your previous losing test results and brainstorm for better ideas – I’m sure you will unearth some real insight gems from this wider team. Then to ensure this review happens in the future too, setup a regular quarterly A/B test results review meeting with these key people.

10: Could you move or increase the size of the tested element so its more prominent?

Another common reason for an inconclusive test A/B test result is because the element being tested is not in a very prominent position and often doesn’t get noticed by visitors. This is particularly true for testing elements that are in side bars or are very low down on pages because these often don’t get seen as much.

Therefore, to try and turn an A/B test with no result into a winning test, consider moving the element being tested to a more prominent location on the page (or another page that gets more traffic) and then re-run the test. This works particularly well with key elements like call-to-action buttons, benefits, risk reducers and key navigation links.

This last step of iterating and retesting the same page or element is essential, as it helps you determine whether it will ever have a good impact on your conversion rates. If you still don’t get a good follow up test result that means you should instead move onto test ideas for another page or element that will hopefully be a better conversion influencer.

Wrapping Up

As you have hopefully realized now, losing A/B test results happen much more often than you might have thought. So go ahead and revisit all your losing test results, review these steps and try to create some better test ideas. Which will you try first? And if you need help, check out my A/B testing services.

What is your conversion rate? Why is it important?

How many visitors does it take to make a sale or generate a lead on your website? If you know the answer to this question, you have everything you need to calculate your conversion rate.

The actual definition is the percentage of your website visitors who take a desired action or complete a goal. Here’s how it’s calculated: if 100 visitors come to your website and 2 take the desired action, you have a 2% website conversion rate (2/100=2%).

The post What is your conversion rate? Why is it important? appeared first on Diamond Website Conversion.

How many visitors does it take to make a sale or generate a lead on your website? If you know the answer to this question, you have everything you need to calculate your conversion rate.

The actual definition is the percentage of your website visitors who take a desired action or complete a goal. Here’s how it’s calculated: if 100 visitors come to your website and 2 take the desired action, you have a 2% website conversion rate (2/100=2%).

The goal or desired action includes not only outcomes that result in sales, but also goals like getting visitors to sign up for your newsletter or watching a video.

The key is visitor expectations and the persuasiveness of your site, because for visitors to take a desired action, they must be achieving their goals.

The post What is your conversion rate? Why is it important? appeared first on Diamond Website Conversion.