Get Inspired – Blow Your Mind Website Examples!

Are you in the market for a new website? Wondering what’s going on in the web design world? In our feature article, we’re going to help you get inspired with some blow your mind website examples. We picked these examples because not only are they attractive, interactive websites, but they are user-friendly and intuitive for […]

The post Get Inspired – Blow Your Mind Website Examples! appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Get Inspired - Blow Your Mind Website Examples

Are you in the market for a new website? Wondering what’s going on in the web design world?

In our feature article, we’re going to help you get inspired with some blow your mind website examples.

We picked these examples because not only are they attractive, interactive websites, but they are user-friendly and intuitive for their customers.

america-first-credit-union

America First Credit Union

This not-for-profit, member-owned financial institution in Utah and Nevada won the Best Credit Union Website award from the 2016 Web Marketing Association’s WebAward competition.

Not only did they win because of their innovative design and content, but they were awarded for their site’s ease of use, interactivity, use of technology and understandable content.

Visit Website

pell-mell

Pell Mell Agency

Pell Mell might mean something in a state of confusion, or something that’s recklessly hasty or disorganized, but you won’t find any of that on this award-winning website.

This site lands on our list because of its fantastic photography and its interactivity.

Simple, yet effective, the Pell Mell Agency website works to get their message across and drive business.

Visit Website

minimums

Minimums

This website’s goal is to highlight interesting people, and it does so in style with a bold and colorful design.

They utilize color and a grid-based web design to set off each person. Combined with big font sizes and quality images, the usability is terrific.

It’s easy to see where you’re going and where you came from due to the site’s organized grid and visual hierarchy.

Visit Website

acme

Acme

A best in class winner from CSS Design Awards, Acme, combines beautiful photographs, interactivity and even music for a pleasurable browsing experience.

While sound is often frowned upon, Acme incorporates it into their site with class.

Bold typography and a movie-like feel make this site uber interesting even though their business is storage solutions for a wide variety of industries.

Visit Website

killing-kennedy

Killing Kennedy

Another website using sound to its advantage, this website is a glorious preview of the movie.

With beautiful era-appropriate piano music, moving images and gorgeous photographs all with a 1950s vibe, users to this site really get a feel for the movie.

National Geographic stands out with this website due to its use of parallax scrolling, video and intriguing historical facts.

It’s easy to get lost in this website while experiencing the dual nature of Lee Harvey Oswald and John F. Kennedy’s lives.

Visit Website

savetherainforest

Save the Rainforest

We added this site to our list for its personal touches, and its incredible design.

Save the Rainforest invites website visitors into the rainforest. It introduces people to the creatures worth saving and makes it easy to donate right on the page.

With the vivid photography and interactivity, visitors to this website get to experience the rainforest in a deeply personal, almost live-action way.

View Website

bronx

Bronx Arts

Parents looking to send their children to school will love the vivid, inside look this website provides.

It hides nothing and welcomes users into the inner sanctum of their child-filled hallways.

Using vivid, large, high-quality images, along with bold typography and plenty of white space, it gives off a healthy, inviting vide for this school.

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divenamic

Divenamic

A simple, clean and modern design lands this site on our list.

It uses bright colors to bring the website visitor in while creating a desire to read more.

Often times, simple design and bright colors work nicely together for great design.

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alpahpod

AlphaPod

A dynamic site, AlphaPod is a teaser for the AlphaPod app for kids. It helps them learn their ABCs with cool animated animals. These aren’t your run of the mill animals, though.

They are mechanical animals that are as fun to look at as they are to interact with. Plus, they’re exciting for kids and even interesting for adults.

Visit Website

house-hunter

The House Hunters Journey

This house hunting website definitely stands on its own when it comes to real estate websites.

Its premise is that house hunting starts in your mind, and you aren’t limited by your imagination.

An interactive website, it takes you through many different levels on your house hunting search. It’s a fun site to peruse.

Visit Website

virgin

Virgin America

Travel websites are notoriously slow and hard to navigate. Not this one.

Virgin America is a top notch airline website. Not only is the entire site mobile-friendly, its usability is amazing.

Site visitors can book a flight with ease and see at a glance the prices of flights on different days of the week. If only all travel sites were this easy!

Visit Website

wrangler

Wrangler Wild Way Home

This is a great eCommerce website. Simple and easy to use, the product and content pages are easy to navigate and full of just the right amount of information.

What’s more, when you click on their “Wild Way Home” tab, you’re taken to a page that invites you to explore your city and take the wild way home.

This website gives the website visitor a real reason to wear their clothing by inviting them into their “wild” city. People can see real people wearing real clothes while exploring their city and getting out more.

Visit Website

Final Thoughts

Now that we’ve tantalized you with some blow your mind website examples, you might be wondering how to set your website apart from the competition. Here’s a list to get you started!

  • Responsive design – this means your site adapts to different browser sizes with ease. Your site should look equally good on desktop, laptop, tablet and mobile phone.
  • Content – provide relevant, interesting, shareable, original and compelling content.
  • An easy to use layout with intuitive navigation. Don’t use multiple layers of menus.
  • A fast website – load times should be under three seconds, or you’ll lose customers.
  • Simple, user friendly experience. Don’t make content hard to find.
  • Calls to action on as many pages as possible. You don’t want to risk losing your customers.
  • Strong site architecture including good onsite SEO and a sitemap.

Look for more blow your mind website examples next month!

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Tran Mau Tri Tram

The post Get Inspired – Blow Your Mind Website Examples! appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Step-by-Step Guide for Google Analytics 2016

Google Analytics stands apart in a league of its own as the best tool for understanding your web traffic and conversions. Yet, as the best tool, it can be confusing and overwhelming to figure out. In this article, we first look at how you set up an account in Google Analytics, and then we look […]

The post Step-by-Step Guide for Google Analytics 2016 appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Step-by-Step Guide for Google Analytics 2016

Google Analytics stands apart in a league of its own as the best tool for understanding your web traffic and conversions.

Yet, as the best tool, it can be confusing and overwhelming to figure out.

In this article, we first look at how you set up an account in Google Analytics, and then we look at some more advanced tips for making it work for you.

Here’s your step-by-step guide for Google Analytics:

Get Started

To make use of the wide reporting options, you first need to set up an account. Follow these straightforward steps:

  1. Visit Google Analytics.
  2. If you don’t have a Gmail address, you’ll need to create one.
  3. If you do have a Gmail address, simply sign in to your account.
  4. Once inside Google Analytics, name your account with your company name, website name and provide your website’s URL.
  5. Google will then provide you with tracking code. You’ll want to copy this code and insert it into all of the pages of your website. You can either add it yourself to your html code, or if you’re using WordPress, use a plugin to do it for you.
  6. Give it a few days before you start looking at reports.

Now that you’ve got the set up done, let’s dive into the advanced tips.

Set Up Goals

You want to track your conversions, so you will use conversion goals to measure them.

Setting up goals allows you to dig deep into the performance of your website. You’ll learn if your website visitors are actually doing what you want them to do.

To set up your goals, we recommend using the SMART method.

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Achievable
  • Relevant
  • Time based

You want to be extra sure that your goals are measurable.

So, the first thing you want to do is decide the action that defines a specific conversion on your website. Google Analytics then uses your goals to track the conversion. Once the goal is achieved, the conversion is logged.

Some examples of goals include:

  • Purchase
  • Newsletter sign up
  • Online registration
  • Information request
  • Download

Next, you want to either create or decide on a destination page. For example, if you want your user to sign up for your newsletter (this is the goal), then the destination page would be the thank you page they land on after completing the task.

This tells Google Analytics that your website visitor completed your form.

Once you’ve got your goal and your destination page, you can set up Goal Tracking.

  1. Visit the Admin tab.
  2. In the View column, click Goal.
  3. Click on +New Goal.
  4. Select a template that meets your needs. Choose from Revenue, Acquisition, Inquiry and Engagement. These are shown to you based on your industry.
  5. Click continue to name your goal.
  6. Choose how you will track your goals. In most instances, you’ll use your destination page.
  7. Click continue and paste in the URL of your destination page.

Measure Conversions

Your Goals are set, and Google Analytics will get to work recording your conversions.

It’s now time to measure your website conversions. Deciphering your reports can be confusing. Here’s how to view them.

You’ll notice a Goal Conversion Rate. This shows the percentage of your page visits that resulted in the conversion you defined in your goal.

This is a key part of your reporting as this is perhaps the best indicator to gauge the effectiveness of your page.

For example, if your conversion rate is high, you’re obviously bringing in good website traffic. This means you’re doing something right.

Yet, if your conversion rate is low, you need to change something on your website. It could be the image, headline, text, call to action, colors, etc. A low conversion rate means you aren’t meeting the needs of your customers.

It’s ideal when you see your goal conversion rate continue to increase over time. This means you’ve refined your landing pages for the best conversion rates.

Next, take a look at your Goal Completions. This number shows you exactly how many website visitors converted. This is a tangible number you can use in your marketing reports.

Third, you want to look at the Goal Value. This is very simple – it’s the monetary value of your conversions.

Conversions are great, but the Goal Value number tells you what each of those conversions is worth to you monetarily.

Understand Your Audience

Now, we’re going to touch on how to evaluate your audience in Google Analytics. Why is this important?

It lets you know if you’re reaching the right people in the right way. You’ll learn things about your website visitors such as:

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Location
  • Interests
  • Browsers
  • Mobile Devices

On the left-hand side in Google Analytics, you’ll see the category for your Audience. Open each of these sections, paying special attention to Demographics and Geo.

Get familiar with your Acquisition report as well. This report shows you how your website visitors arrived on your site.

This helps you know if it was email, social media, organic or pay-per-click.

Discovering the data in these reports helps you learn what works best for driving traffic to your website to help you increase your goal conversions.

Your audience reports can also tell you how many page views your website had. For example, if a visitor landed on your site and visited five pages, you can see where he went.

You can also view the number of new and returning visitors.

Think about your website goals. Are you after new or returning visitors? This is where you’ll see if you’re meeting your goals.

Take a look at your visitor flow as well. This helps you see where people came from.

To Conclude

In this guide, we’ve touched on just a few of the many things Google Analytics has to offer.

Once you’ve set up Google Analytics on your website, you have access to an abundance of information.

You want to use that information to make changes and additions to your website so you can continue to improve your conversion rate.

You’ll find it relatively easy to set up Google Analytics and view your first set of simple reports.

We do encourage you to get started with Goals as they can really help you gauge your conversion rate. Use our advanced tips to get started and stick with it.

The more you use Google Analytics, the more comfortable with it you’ll become.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by tracking your conversions in Google Analytics? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Louis Llerna

The post Step-by-Step Guide for Google Analytics 2016 appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

How To Color Your Website And Influence Conversion!

Have you ever wondered if a specially chosen color would affect the buying habits of your website visitors? The answer is, “yes,” color absolutely influences visitors to your website, and it is even responsible for the actions they take. Let’s look at how to color your website and influence conversion, but, first, let’s review why […]

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How To Color Your Website And Influence Conversion!

Have you ever wondered if a specially chosen color would affect the buying habits of your website visitors?

The answer is, “yes,” color absolutely influences visitors to your website, and it is even responsible for the actions they take.

Let’s look at how to color your website and influence conversion, but, first, let’s review why color has such power to persuade your website visitors.

Color is a Powerful Persuader

In a study called Impact of Color in Marketing, researchers found that 90% of the snap judgments people make about your products are based on color alone.

Another study confirms that people make purchases based on how they are affected by the colors you use. They go on to say that the colors must work together with your brand to be effective.

So, you can see that color is indeed a powerful persuader, and the reasons why are numerous.

While many studies exist telling you what color to use for your calls to action and your headlines, and this matters, there are other studies that say predicting consumer reaction to the color is also important.

For example, swimming pool websites are most often blue-toned, and car dealership websites usually incorporate a lot of black. Now, just imagine if the main color on these websites was pink.

Color is a quite definitely a powerful persuader, and it pays to think of the color in context.

You also want to think of your audience when choosing your colors.

It’s time to look at how to color your website and influence conversion.

The Properties of Color

You’ll find that different colors have different meanings for people all across the globe. For example, some colors in the United States don’t affect people the same way as the same colors in another country would affect their residents.

Research your target audience so you aren’t using an offensive color or one that means something other than you’d like it to mean.

We’re going to look at the properties of color as they are widely recognized and the feelings they can bring about.

Blue

We most often think of blue as the quintessential color. It represents trust and authority, and it’s soothing and calming.

Some cultures tie it with strength, while others see it as safe and divine.

It’s worth noting that the most popular social platform in the world, Facebook, is blue. The reason is quite simple: it symbolizes trust, loyalty, transparency and sometimes power.

Website designers often use blue in call-to-action buttons and headline text. Combined with just the right fonts, this color has massive impact.

Green

This is another power color, and it’s also often used in calls-to-action.

It represents nature and the outdoors, creativity, youth and also happiness. Consider how it’s also the color of good luck.

In the negative arena, green symbolizes jealousy, and in some countries, it’s the color of death.

Purple

The color of royalty, wealth and fame, purple isn’t the best color for conversions.

Pink

Universally accepted as the color for girls and women, pink represents sweetness, fun and childhood.

Worth noting, is that while it’s believe to be every woman’s favorite color, that is often not the case.

Red

Much of the world views red as the color of action, passion and excitement. It often symbolizes a sale or something with a sense of immediacy.

It is another power player in conversions.

On the flip side, and in some countries, it can denote anger or danger.

Orange

Orange is the happy friendly color, and it’s full of energy. Orange is the color of confidence and physical activity and works well with blue.

It’s also the color of fall and Halloween.

For some cultures, orange is associated with mourning or loss, and in others it symbolizes courage.

Yellow

Many people love yellow for its happy connotations and warm color. It’s often associated with summer, and many think of it as the color of prosperity as well.

Black

Most cultures usually see black as the color of death.

We do encourage you to use some black in your website design, though, as it grounds your site and provides definition.

White

The color of weddings, purity and modernity is white.

While you can’t use white in your call-action-buttons, you should use white space on your site to make it easier for your website visitors to find what you are guiding them to.

Using Color the Right Way

Now that we’ve looked at the basic psychology behind a handful of colors, we’re going to look at how to use it in the right way.

Your goal is to use color to capture your website visitor’s attention and direct them to the action you want them to take.

For example, if you use a green call-to-action button (which is a good idea), but your website also uses green headings and other colors of green, the conversion point is lost.

So, while some colors may convert better, they have to stand out enough to accomplish the task. Think high contrast to grab visitor’s attention.

Primary and secondary colors are usually a good bet – think green, red, orange and yellow – as they tend to convert the best.

But, the caveat here is not to use the colors elsewhere on your site.

Leveraging Color Theory

Another thing to consider is color theory and how you apply it to your website.

First, you want to concentrate on contrast. This not only makes your site more readable, but it drives your website visitor to your desired action.

Next, you want to think about complementary colors. These are the colors on opposite sides of the color wheel like green and red or blue and orange.

Finally, you want to use colors with a purpose. Use color to set the tone of your website. Warm colors like red, yellow and orange provide energy while green, blue, and purple are more relaxing.

To Conclude

Your website visitors respond to color. Guide their attitudes towards certain colors by learning about the emotions surrounding the color. Know your target audience so it’s easier to choose your colors.

It’s a good idea to take these advanced tips on website conversions into account and use color psychology to improve your online sales and conversions.

Color is one of the biggest factors affecting your website conversions. Do your research, and if you’re unsure, testing is always the best plan.

Use this guide full of expert tips on the use of color to drive your website conversions on your individual landing pages and watch your leads increase.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by using color for conversions? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: RhondaK Native Florida Folk Artist

The post How To Color Your Website And Influence Conversion! appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Google Data Studio – Be a Data Rock Star

Have you heard of Google Data Studio? If not, we’re going to tell you what it is and how you can be a data rock star just by using it. If you have heard of it, you’ll enjoy our advanced tips that break it down into something that is easy for your business to use. […]

The post Google Data Studio – Be a Data Rock Star appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Google Data Studio - Be a Data Rock StarHave you heard of Google Data Studio?

If not, we’re going to tell you what it is and how you can be a data rock star just by using it. If you have heard of it, you’ll enjoy our advanced tips that break it down into something that is easy for your business to use.

What is Google Data Studio?

What if we told you that Google Data Studio could turn all of your very confusing Google Analytics and other data into beautiful, informative reports?

What if we took it a step further and told you that these reports would be easy to read, easy to share and easy to customize?

In Google’s (beta) Data Studio, you can create up to five custom reports that are always updated.

You can even choose how you want to deliver your data – line graphs, charts, bar graphs and more. And, you can even add your own branding.

Just like Google Drive, the reports update in real time and can enhance how you share and view your analytics.

Since the reports are dynamic, they update when the data source is updated. Any new info or changes you add show up on your reports.

You’ll find enhanced reporting as all of your data is easily accessible and instantly updated for everyone with whom you choose to share the reports.

While analytics have long been a challenge for most digital marketers, with Google Data Studio, you can create reports that everyone can understand.

It’s Not Just for Google Analytics

One of the coolest things about Google Data Studio is that you can pull in data from virtually any source as long as that information is housed in a Google Sheet.

So, yes, that means you can import your Facebook data or insights from any other social media platform that is housed in a Google Sheet.

If the item is Google-owned, such as Google Analytics, it doesn’t have to be on a Google Sheet.

Google Data Studio Outline

Now, let’s break Google Data Studio down a bit. The Data Studio helps you do three things really well.

  1. It allows you to connect different data points in one spreadsheet so all of your analytics are available in one place. So, the first thing you have to do before preparing your analysis is to make sure you have gathered all of your data. While you can pull Google data in naturally, any other data sources must be compiled on your Google Sheets.
  2. Next, you can visualize your data by pulling it all together. Think of it like your very own dot-to-dot. You bring all the pieces into your Google Data Studio, and the program creates a beautiful report.
  3. Finally, you can share your reports so you can collaborate with people all across the globe. It’s just like Google Docs and Google Sheets. Your co-workers or your boss don’t ever have to wait for you to send them a report because it updates in real time.

Google Data Studio is Free

Right now, for all of you data gatherers, Google Data Studio is free. You will find some restrictions, though, if you aren’t paying for Google 360.

You can currently only have five reports per account, or email address, associated with Data Studio. You can of course always add another email.

But, like Google Sheets, there is another solution. You can add additional pages on each of your reports thus increasing the amount of data you can represent.

Data Source Options

We told you that you can bring data from a myriad of other systems into Google Data Studio.

What we haven’t touched on is an advanced feature. You can use data sources in three different levels:

  1. At the report level, you’ll find this is the highest level component in the chain. When you attach data sources to a report, you can use it across all of your pages. You’ll even find that you can have multiple sources attached to a report. You do have to choose one as the default.
  2. At the page level, you’ll find this is a component of your report. When you set a data source to a page, you make it the default to that page even if another data source is set as the default in the report level.
  3. At the chart level, you see a beautiful, usable graphic representation of the data within your page. This is the lowest level in the chain. You’ll enjoy the fact that you can set data sources to specific charts at this level.

How to Make a Usable Report

Now that we’ve looked at Google Data Studio and defined it, let’s look at some advanced tips for you reporting.

First, filter controls give users power. You’ll find your analysis is more effective when you have chosen the right filters.

Consistency is key so your reports make more sense.

Next, when looking at the design element of your Google Data Studio report, pay attention to your headers and page dividers.

Use these elements for organization and to maintain the consistency of your report. Be clear in your headers so content is easily find-able.

Mix it up when designing your report. For example, don’t make everything into a bar graph. Use pie charts, line charts and tables.

Finally, tap in to your inner designer and add some color to your report. Color can help define sections and headers. Don’t overdo it, though, as too much color is off-putting.

Remember that the purpose of your report is visual in nature. You want co-workers, clients and bosses to be able to see at a glance how your digital marketing is working.

With improved data reporting and increased visualization, you’ll find that Google Data Studio has the ability to make a whole new generation of marketers more comfortable with digital marketing reports.

Final Thoughts

So, how do you know if Google Data Studio is right for you?

If you want to present beautiful, easily readable spreadsheets, but you find them cumbersome and confusing to create, it’s the program for you.

Google Data Studio helps your data make sense and look good. In an easily understandable format, you can hold your business accountable and see if your digital marketing efforts are panning out.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by analyzing your marketing metrics? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Sergio Alejandro Ortiz

The post Google Data Studio – Be a Data Rock Star appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Making Marketing Analytics Simple And Easy To Understand

Does the thought of marketing analytics make you cringe? Does it seem overwhelming and time consuming? Many business owners find analytics and reporting a cumbersome task and one they put off until absolutely necessary. If this is you, or you’d like some advanced tips on measuring data, this is the article for you. We look […]

The post Making Marketing Analytics Simple And Easy To Understand appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Making Marketing Analytics Simple And Easy To Understand

Does the thought of marketing analytics make you cringe? Does it seem overwhelming and time consuming?

Many business owners find analytics and reporting a cumbersome task and one they put off until absolutely necessary. If this is you, or you’d like some advanced tips on measuring data, this is the article for you.

We look at making marketing analytics simple and easy to understand so it’s something you want to do, not grudgingly have to do.

First, let’s define marketing analytics.

Marketing Analytics Is…

Marketers (and business owners) use marketing analytics to evaluate the success of their marketing initiatives.

These analytics make up the processes and technologies to measure their performance.

Bottom line – marketing analytics tell you if your marketing programs are working.

You want to gather your data from all of your marketing channels and consolidate it into one common view. From here, you can decide how to drive your future marketing efforts.

To increase your lead generation and ultimately your conversions, you’ve got to know how to interpret your data.

Many business owners think marketing analytics are best left to the experts. We’re here to tell you that you are the expert. No more worries about metrics. You can do it.

To create your report, you want to attend to these items first:

  • Ask yourself what you want to learn.
  • Find the report that answers that question.
  • Put it into your overall marketing analytics.
  • Include a balanced assortment of reports.
  • Assess your strategies.
  • Then, you can use your report to change or revise your marketing strategy.

Here’s how to make marketing analytics simple and easy to understand.

Take Little Bites

When gathering your data, you often have access to multiple metrics. In the beginning start small.

A good place to begin is with page views, conversions and visitor information.

You want to track the most important information first. After you get accustomed to analytics and reporting, you can dive deeper for more metrics.

Marketing experts put much of their emphasis tracking conversions. Why?

This is a much more accurate number for you to gauge your success. Conversions track actual customers doing something on your website, like signing up, downloading information or buying something.

Your conversion rate focuses on dollars and the value of your visitor.

Be the Master

The true analytics expert knows which metrics and data matter and which ones don’t matter so much.

The fact is you don’t need to track everything. It’s too hard to stay on top of it all.

For example, if you want to focus on lead generation, your most important data is page views and your opt-in rate.

Understand Your Data

It also helps to narrow your focus to the most relevant metrics so you know what data to capture.

Here are some areas to look at depending on your business:

Ecommerce businesses can look at conversion rate, total revenue, orders completed, average order value, drop off rate and where that happens and full on cart abandonment.

A business to business company might look at page visits, page views, conversion rate and leads generated.

A business to consumer company might focus on conversion rate, click-through rate and orders completed.

Remain Objective

It’s easy to selectively look at your data and search for things that confirm a hypothesis. You might have something in mind you want to confirm and find data that validates it, but that leads you to ignore all of the contrary information.

Don’t get caught up looking for metrics that confirm what you expect and disregard all other data.

Be objective and look at the data from multiple angles.

For example, many people think a high bounce rate is due to the fact that visitors didn’t like your page. But you have to ask these questions:

  • What is happening?
  • Why is it happening?

Your first instinct is to attribute a high bounce rate to people not liking your page. Yet, there are many other reasons your landing page may have a high bounce rate:

  • Your content is superb and meets the users’ needs, and you only have one call to action that people take and then “bounce” off.
  • The landing page was simply to collect an email address, thus they bounce when they were done.
  • Your page load time is too high.
  • Your page doesn’t meet users’ needs.
  • Users landed on your page from a Google Ad campaign, and your page didn’t match the ad.

The goal is to assess why you have a high bounce rate before arbitrarily deciding you have to redo your entire page.

Know the Value

You’ve probably searched Google for “What’s a good conversion rate?” That isn’t necessarily the same information for everyone.

You want to understand the value of your analytics for your industry. Don’t stack your business up to businesses in other industries because their “good” conversion rate may not be yours.

Your Google search should instead be for, “What’s a good conversion rate in my industry?” Once you’ve narrowed down the field, you really can compare rates.

Comparing to unlike industries sets you up for misplaced expectations.

Final Thoughts

Now that you know how to make marketing analytics simple and easy to understand, we want to leave you with a few more thoughts.

Take advantage of these advanced ways to break down your marketing into analytics you can understand.

If you don’t, you’ll end up with a bunch of marketing information cobbled together that has no relationship with one another.

To make the best decisions for your business, you have to take your entire marketing picture into account.

This means your social media insights, your Google analytics and your emails stats. It means taking a look at all of your marketing efforts in one place so you can decide how to proceed.

Use your marketing analytics to make sound business decisions and drive your future marketing. Use them to refine and test your lead generation to increase your profits.

Tie your marketing efforts to your leads to your bottom line, and you’ll quickly see what’s working and where you can improve.

So, say goodbye to marketing analysis paralysis. Use these advanced tips to make it work for your business.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by analyzing your marketing metrics? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

 With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

 If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Kazuend

 

The post Making Marketing Analytics Simple And Easy To Understand appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Your Definitive Guide To Customer Acquisition

Customer acquisition is the process you go through to gain new customers. It’s how you persuade people to purchase your products or services. Are you doing enough to increase your customer acquisition rates? In this article, we provide your definitive guide to customer acquisition. You’ll learn some advanced strategies for acquiring, and keeping, new customers. […]

The post Your Definitive Guide To Customer Acquisition appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Your Definitive Guide To Customer Acquisition

Customer acquisition is the process you go through to gain new customers. It’s how you persuade people to purchase your products or services.

Are you doing enough to increase your customer acquisition rates? In this article, we provide your definitive guide to customer acquisition.

You’ll learn some advanced strategies for acquiring, and keeping, new customers.

First, let’s look at the cost of customer acquisition.

The Cost

An often neglected part of the customer acquisition process is the cost to do so.

For small businesses and even established ones, this cost can quickly get out of control if it isn’t watched and monitored.

The most successful businesses can rattle off their customer acquisition cost numbers. To help you know your customer acquisition costs (CAC), follow this formula:

  • Take the entire cost of your sales and marketing over a specific time period and divide it by the number of customers you acquired in that same period.

For example, if you spent $1000 on marketing in one year, and you acquired 1000 new customers that year, your CAC is $1.00.

Another helpful number to know is the Lifetime Value of a Customer (LTV). To find this number, you look at the gross margin you expect to make from that customer over the lifetime of your relationship.

In a well-balanced business model, your CAC shouldn’t exceed the LTV of your customer. It should be significantly less.

Now, it’s time for the advanced tips on customer acquisition.

Content Marketing

You’ve probably heard that in this century, content is king. This phrase was coined in 1996 by Bill Gates who saw the future of the Internet as a marketplace for content.

It turns out that content is an allover great tactic for acquiring new customers.

Why? The content you publish on your website allows you to meet new and potential customers head on with the content they need.

By providing your website visitors with the content they want and need, you’ll not only meet their goals, but yours as well. Intrigue your site visitors with practical, useful, educational, important and sometimes humorous content, and you’ll encourage them to sign on as your customer.

Search Engine Optimization

You’ve got the great content to attract new customers, but have you properly optimized it?

Customer acquisition can’t happen if people can’t find your content.

Share your content through email marketing and social media. The more shares and links back to your website, the better. These work together to increase your natural, organic rank in the search engines.

Conversion Rate Optimization

Once your visitors land on your website, you have to do something with them. If they simply land on a page with content, but they don’t see any further actions to take, they’ll just bounce off.

When it comes to customer acquisition, your conversion rate optimization matters. Improve your landing pages to increase your leads and your sales.

Consider A/B testing your copy, calls to action buttons, colors and images to see what works best.

Copy Writing

A piece of your conversion rate depends on your copy – the body copy and your headlines.

Your copy is important. Give great thought to your headlines. Are they catchy? Do they match the content? Are they spot on or misleading?

Then look at your body copy. It should be specific and succinct. Choosing the right words here can make the difference between a sale and a bounce.

If you aren’t sure what works, test your landing pages. This is the best way to find out what copy converts the best.

Social Media Marketing

Social media is another terrific tactic for customer acquisition.

Use your social media platforms to get people back to your website where you can intrigue them with your quality content and then encourage them to take your desired action.

Email Marketing

Have you started building your email list? It’s an essential step to customer acquisition.

For example, a website visitor lands on your optimized landing page, reads your optimized content and then clicks on your call to action – signing up for your email list.

Once on your email list, you can continue to market to them in the privacy of their own inbox.

All of your inbound marketing and SEO worked to encourage them to join your email list. Through your future email marketing, you can direct them to your products and services.

Analytics

Don’t forget your analytics.

The only way to know if your customer acquisition tactics are working is by analyzing your data. Your analytics shows you which of your tactics are most successful and which pages your customers are visiting or leaving.

Use your Google Analytics to see what’s happening on your website. Set up funnels, view your traffic sources and rules and set up your goal tracking.

Then, take a look at who is visiting your website. Find out what they do before and after they sign up on your website or take another action.

A good way to analyze your metrics is to start by making goals and working backwards. Since we’re discussing customer acquisition, that is your goal here.

Then build the funnel. Perhaps it starts with an email sign up, and then you send them an email inviting them to a free trial of your product or service. Ultimately, you hope they’ll convert to full paying, lifetime customers.

Identify your metrics in your funnels. You want to know things like who signed up for your email list or white paper and then who converted into a paying customer.

Final Thoughts

You see that in your definitive guide to customer acquisition, you have many advanced tactics at your disposal.

You’ll find that there are many different ways that lead to the same end goal of customer acquisition.

How do you choose the right strategy? First, you have to know you target audience. Next, you have to know how they’ll make their way through your sales funnel. Do some research on both your audience and your customer acquisition funnel before you create your acquisition strategies.

And, remember, you don’t have to choose just one tactic. Use a few and integrate them for the best success. Your ultimate goal is to increase your website conversion rate through the acquisition of new customers.

Test your strategies, and then test them again. Use what works and refine the rest.

You’ll soon be on your way to growing your company through targeted customer acquisition strategies.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by optimizing your leads and your lead generation process to drive your business online? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Alvaro Serrano

The post Your Definitive Guide To Customer Acquisition appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails

Your customers are the essence of your business. Most business owners instinctively know this. What many don’t know is that you have to cultivate and nurture your customers to grow your base and retain your customers. In this article, we look at seven ways to grow your business with emails. We’ll show you how to […]

The post 7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails

Your customers are the essence of your business. Most business owners instinctively know this.

What many don’t know is that you have to cultivate and nurture your customers to grow your base and retain your customers.

In this article, we look at seven ways to grow your business with emails. We’ll show you how to do it and why.

Let’s look at the transactional email and the power it has to grow your business.

The Transactional Email

Transactional emails are triggered emails. They involve correspondence you send to someone based on the action your user had with your website.

For example, your customer places an online order, and he expects a confirmation in his inbox shortly thereafter. This is a transactional email.

Often times if the customer doesn’t receive your email, he’ll call customer service to find out why not.

How about when someone signs up for your email list. Do you send them a welcome email? Again, this is a transactional email.

If you aren’t leveraging the power of this type of advanced email marketing, you’re missing out on a big chance to grow your customer base.

Bottom line – a transactional email is an advanced way to send trigger-based, ultra-personalized, targeted and highly-specific emails.

You can expect your transactional emails to have high open and click-thru rates and low bounce rates. This is, after all, information that’s valuable to your customer.

How Transactional Emails Grow Your Base

First, your customers are usually happy to see these emails in their inboxes. Because they’ve done something on your website to trigger the info, they are usually expecting it.

Email marketing extends your digital reach well past your website. Your customers have invited you into the inner sanctum of their inbox, so you have a chance to deliver personal, valuable information.

Now let’s look at the seven ways to grow your customer base with emails – transactional emails.

#1: Welcome Email

Someone created an account, made a purchase, downloaded a product or signed up on your site. This is a good tie to send them a welcome email.

Welcome emails usually provide a login and password and a welcome from your company.

Take this time to say thank you and let your customers know how much you appreciate them. Send this email within an hour of the action taken.

You can also include a call to action in the welcome email. How about asking your customers to tweet or share that they joined your company?

#2: Confirmation Email

You send a confirmation email to notify your email user when the action they took on your website is complete.

This email is fairly straightforward as it’s most often a receipt for a purchase, confirmation of a reservation or a link to a download.

Confirmations have all the information your customer needs in them. It’s up to you, though, to make sure you’re getting everything you can out of the email.

You can take the space to add some additional information in your email that provides value for your customer.

Offer them helpful tips and resources. For example, if they purchased a new camera from you, direct them to your website for blogs and whitepapers on how to use it.

If they booked a room at your hotel, send them their confirmation email with a list of restaurants and things to do in the area. Include insider tips only locals know about.

#3: Newsletter Sign Up Confirmation Email

Don’t be the business who neglects to send a newsletter sign up confirmation. Many of your website visitors will be confused if you don’t.

Not only do these emails confirm their subscription, but this is your chance to let them know what to expect and to welcome them to your “family.”

Provide them a list of what you’ll send and when. Give them a brief overview of the types of information you’ll send.

If you offered them something special for joining your list, you want to provide it to them in this email.

#4: Cart Abandonment Email

Cart abandonment is one of the biggest challenges facing e-retailers today, as the average abandonment rate is nearly 70%.

The best way to encourage your customers to come back to your website and complete their purchase is with a transactional email.

Often, people who return to their carts spend more than they had originally planned.

The best time to send this email is within 24 hours of the abandoned cart. You can even include a special offer such as free shipping or 10% off to increase the odds they’ll finish their purchase.

Do put a time limit on the promo – a sense of urgency moves the process along.

#5: Birthday Email

These are easy emails to send and work to further customer loyalty by growing your customer base.

Provide a gift for your customer in this email. Think video, download or special.

#6: Customer Feedback Email

This email solicits feedback from your customer. Ask for comments on your products and services.

It lets your customers know you value their opinion.

#7: Reactivation Email

Send this email to subscribers who used to interact with you, but haven’t in a while. This email is the perfect vehicle to grow your customer base.

These emails keep your company top of mind and remind subscribers why they signed up in the first place.

To Conclude

We’ve looked at seven ways to grow your customer base with emails.

These emails are transactional emails, and they are key to your advanced email marketing strategy.

Why? Transactional emails are expected, and they encourage your users to take another action.

While some transactional emails are sent because of someone’s inaction, many more are sent because of their action.

Another word for transactional emails that grow your customer base is relationship-based emails. These emails have much higher open and click-thru rates. They also have greater revenue potential than regular emails.

It’s in your best interest to harness the power of the transactional email today. Increase your engagement opportunities with relationship-based emails and watch your customer base grow.

We’d like to leave you with one last tip. Ensure that every transactional email you send is optimized for mobile. The email must render as well on a smartphone or tablet as it does on a desktop or laptop computer.

Are you ready to squeeze more profit out of your website by fine-tuning your landing pages to skyrocket growth among your email subscribers and current customers? That’s terrific! We’re here to help you optimize your website so it works fluidly for your website visitors. In fact, we promise you we’ll do just that.

With our guarantee, you can rest assured we will increase your profits through landing page optimization.

If you’re ready to work with the leader in landing pages and conversion rate optimization, contact us today.

We’ll provide you with our FREE site performance analysis so we can work on your landing page conversion rates.

Image: Alexandru Tudorache

The post 7 Ways To Grow Your Customer Base With Emails appeared first on Landing Page Optimization Blog.

Unbounce: How it Compares to Rivals Like Leadpages and Instapage

Creating high-impact landing pages are essential if you want better results from your online marketing efforts. And there are now many tools that help you quickly create high quality landing pages. But which landing page…

Unbounce versus Instapage and Leadpages

Creating high-impact landing pages are essential if you want better results from your online marketing efforts. And there are now many tools that help you quickly create high quality landing pages.

But which landing page tool is best? There are now so many to choose from, each with different benefits.

To help you decide for yourself, I have compared and reviewed the three leading landing page tools – Unbounce, Instapage and Leadpages. I have created a comparison table including ratings for key aspects of the tools, listed the pros and cons of each, and who each tool is best for.

First of all, why use a landing page creation tool?

  • Lets you create high quality website pages quickly and easily without needing help from developers
  • Few design skills are needed as tools come with many stylish modern templates to choose from
  • You benefit from templates featuring best practices to convert more visitors into sales or leads

So now let’s move onto the actual ratings and comparisons for these major landing page creation tools. As you can see each has their own specific advantages and disadvantages:

unbounce logo instapage logo leadpages logo
Cost Plans from $79 a month for their ‘Essential’ level (500K visitors). Plans start from $99 a month for ‘Core’ level (200K visitors). Plans start from $25 a month for ‘Standard’ level (unlimited visitors).
Amount and quality of landing page templates
9/10 Great amount of templates (125+) and very high quality with built in conversion best practices. All are now mobile optimized. 9/10 Over 200 good quality templates which are all mobile optimized. AMP pages available but at enterprise level only. 7/10 The highest amount of templates offered, but many have extra cost to use. Varying quality of templates, but are all mobile optimized.
Ease of use of the page editor
8/10 Ease to use page editor. Advanced features are harder for beginners though. 8/10 Simple to use and intuitive editor menu system. Ideal for beginners. 8/10 Easy to use editor that is very intuitive and ideal for beginners.
Ability to customize pages
9/10 Excellent ability with full drag and drop options. Not limited to a grid system. 9/10 Good drag and drop and CSS page editing options. Also includes ‘Instablocks’ for sharing across many pages. 5/10 Very limited page customization ability as it uses a rigid grid layout for editing.
Amount of landing page features
8/10 Great amount of features. Includes new popups and sticky bars. 8/10 Good amount of features. Lacks popups, but includes good countdown timers and multi-step forms. 9/10 Highest amount of features and includes variety of popup and exit intent options.
Landing page hosting and tool integration options 9/10 Pages hosted on their servers or on WordPress. Great tool integration options including most email marketing tools and Google Analytics. 9/10 Pages hosted on most websites including WordPress, and an option to host on their servers. Good amount of tool integrations. 9/10 Pages hosted on most types of website including WordPress or their servers. Good amount of tool integration options.
Analytics and reporting options
8/10 Simple reporting of traffic and conversions, with good option to get traffic and conversion reports by email. 9/10 Excellent reporting functionality and conversion tracking, now with click heatmaps on premium plans. 8/10 Good reporting and graph options make it easy to understand traffic and conversions.
A/B testing options
8/10 Good A/B testing options in all plans, with easy ability to create multiple variations. 8/10 Good A/B testing options includes in all plans. 6/10 A/B testing only included in the ‘pro’ level and up plans (from $48 per month).
Popup lead generation options
9/10 Offers good easily customizable popups including entry and exit intent features, and available with all plans. 5/10 Basic popup boxes with all plans, but no entry or exit intent popups included (I recommend using OptinMonster for this). 9/10 Strong emphasis on popups with their excellent ‘Lead Boxes’ feature, including exit intent options.
Support options
9/10 Phone, email and live chat support at all plan levels. Great coaching included in enterprise level. 8/10 Live chat and email support at all plan levels. 7/10 Varies by plan. Email support only at lowest plan. Phone support only offered in highest level plan.
Overall rating 9/10 Has the best page editing options and flexibility. Definitely the best option for experts and marketing teams. 8/10 Great all-around tool, but costs more than Unbounce. Reasonable editor with good features, for beginners and experts. 7/10 Lowest cost and great popup options, but page editor gives least flexibility. Better suited for beginners.
Free trial? 30-day free trial plus 20% off first 3 months 30-day free trial – no credit card needed 14-day free trial  – credit card needed though

 

As you can see from the comparison table, all three tools have high ratings, so now let’s explore in more detail. Here are the pros and cons of each tool, and then which type of user each tool is ideal for.

Unbounce Overview

Overall an excellent choice, ideal for marketers who want to get the most flexibility for creating pages. Comes at higher cost than the other landing page tools though.

unbounce editor screenshot

Unbounce Pros:

  • Has the most flexible editor which is not restricted to a grid system like LeadPages uses
  • New popups and sticky bars feature for lead generation is excellent and highly customizable
  • Great high quality templates with many conversion best practices built in
  • Has dynamic keyword replacement for getting better results from PPC campaigns
  • Offers the best support options even at the lowest plan level, including phone support

Unbounce Cons:

  • Most expensive tool and gets more expensive with high traffic levels (over 5,000 visitors per month)
  • Doesn’t offer as many features as the other tools e.g. lacks countdown timer
  • Beginners may prefer other landing page tools that have a simpler grid editing system

Rating on G2Crowd: 4.3/5 (as of Jan 2019)

Try the tool for yourself: Get a free 30 day trial of Unbounce (plus 20% off)

I negotiated a special offer with them so that you can get 20% off your first 3 months.

Instapage Overview

Overall a great landing page tool for beginners and experts, with good options (apart from offering no popups though), and a simple to use editor.

instapage screenshot

Instapage Pros:

  • The highest amount of templates included with fairly good quality
  • Has one of the easiest to use editors for customizing pages, great for beginners
  • Very easy to setup and integrate with WordPress and other common tools
  • Offers great built-in click heatmaps on their premium plans

Instapage Cons:

  • Only basic popup functionality included, unlike the other tools reviewed
  • More expensive than Unbounce which offers similar features
  • The editor could offer more customization options, not as good as Unbounce

Rating on G2Crowd: 4.5/5 (as of Jan 2019)

Try the tool for yourself: Get a free 30 day trial of Instapage

Leadpages Overview

The lowest cost option and great for beginners wanting to create pages quickly, although has the poorest flexibility to customize pages out of all the tools.

leadpages screenshot

Leadpages Pros:

  • Excellent popup functionality with their Lead Boxes feature, great for lead capture
  • Offer the lowest monthly plan for creating landing pages ($25)
  • Good amount of templates that don’t need much customization
  • They offer the biggest template marketplace if you want to buy versus create

Leadpages Cons:

  • Poorest page customization options out of all tools, restricted to a fixed grid layout
  • They don’t offer the ability to start from a blank page, you must start from a template
  • Many of their templates look very average or have become too commonly used

Rating on G2Crowd: 4.0/5 (as of Jan 2019)

Try the tool for yourself: Get a 14-day free trial of Leadpages

So which landing page tool is better?

As you can see, all three tools rate well for creating landing pages. Each have different strengths and weaknesses which will be more important to different types of users. To help you understand which is better for your needs, here are the main tool differences and who each is ideal for:

  • Use Unbounce if you want the most flexibility when creating pages and want the most customization options. Ideal for experienced online marketers with advanced needs for landing pages.
  • Use Instapage if you want a good overall tool for creating landing pages at a reasonable cost. Ideal for online marketers with moderate landing page needs, although A/B testing feature is expensive.
  • Use Leadpages if you are beginner or want simple landing pages, and don’t want many customization options. Ideal for entrepreneurs who want to create landing pages, and people with lower budgets.

So which tool you should chose really depends on what your needs are for creating landing pages. I use Unbounce for creating my landing pages as I prefer greater editing options and flexibility. I suggest you check out Unbounce, Instapage and Leadpages, and see for yourself as they all now offer free trials.

Other landing page tools worth checking out

I reviewed and compared the 3 most popular landing page creation tools. There are some other good options you can consider though, and each have their own strengths:

  • OptimizePress – a landing page WordPress plugin, ideal if you don’t want to pay monthly
  • LanderApp – one of the lowest cost and better landing page tools to appear recently
  • KickOffLabs – growing fast and includes unique email marketing and contest features

Wrapping up

That is my expert 2 cents for the best landing page tools. Now over to you – which is your favorite tool for creating landing pages? Please comment below.

Disclaimer: This comparison review contains links that earn referral fees for me. I would appreciate you using these links when you sign up for a trial with any of these tools.

The Hotjar Guide for Improving Your Website Sales or Leads

Are you using Hotjar yet? It’s a really powerful 8-in-1 website analytics and feedback tool that reveals exactly what your visitors think of your website, including the most common issues they have, and what they…

hotjar website improving guide

Are you using Hotjar yet? It’s a really powerful 8-in-1 website analytics and feedback tool that reveals exactly what your visitors think of your website, including the most common issues they have, and what they like the most about it. They now have over 200,000 online businesses signed up.

But most users of Hotjar don’t really know how to get the most from it.

They set it up, and can be disappointed with what they find, or don’t know its true potential.

Especially because there are 8 different tools in it, each with their own advantages and mistakes to avoid.

The tool offers excellent insights for improving your website conversion rate and sales (or leads), but only if you know the best ways to set it up and use it.

That’s why I have created this in-depth guide to help you maximize the true potential of this tool and transform the amount of sales or leads coming from your website.

hotjar screenshot

This Hotjar guide really helps with the most important part of conversion rate optimization – conversion research, and you can use it to improve any kind of website, from ecommerce websites to startup websites. It’s a pretty long guide, so for easier navigation I have included links for the main contents:

Part 1: Collect website visitor research using Hotjar
Part 2: Look for insights from Hotjar findings
Part 3: Create and launch high-impact improvement ideas

A quick overview of the 8 tools included with Hotjar:

Before we get into details of how to use Hotjar for greatest success, I thought it would be good to give a quick overview of the main features of the tool and their benefits.

1: Visitor clickmaps: Much like CrazyEgg offers, these heatmaps let you see exactly what your visitors are clicking on (and is often quite different than you may expect). These give you great insights for knowing which elements on your pages need improving most or making more or less prominent.

2: Visitor recordings: These let you discover exactly what visitors do on your website, including mouse movements and how far they scroll. The recordings are often very revealing, and help you understand which parts of your website that visitors are most often having problems with, and their typical journey.

3: Feedback polls: This polls feature is similar to the Qualaroo tool, and takes the form of a single question in the bottom right corner of your website. This is one of the most simple yet powerful parts of the tool, and is excellent for gathering very insightful quick feedback on specific pages of your website.

4: Form analytics: Google Analytics can’t easily help you with this part – this feature reveals exactly which fields on your forms that visitors most often abandon on. Very important for using on your sign-up forms and checkout pages, the insights from this are vital for improving completion rates of your forms.

5: Funnel analytics: This feature helps you understand exactly how well your checkout or signup flows are performing, and the drop off rate of your visitors between each page of the flow. This helps you discover which pages in your funnel need improving first.

6: Visitor Surveys: It also includes a survey tool every bit as good as SurveyMonkey.com. Use it to find out in-depth feedback from your visitors, and exactly what they think of your website content and your offerings, and get feedback on how they would improve it.

7: Incoming Feedback: This simple but effective tool allows visitors to leave ratings of your pages and website elements, and allows them to easily take and send screenshots of what they are having issues with or what they are loving.

8: User feedback recruitment: This helps you find participants for doing website usability and user research. I won’t be focusing on this in this guide though, as you need additional tools to run the usability research (like UserFeel.com).

Part one: Collect website visitor research using Hotjar

Time required for this part: You will need a few hours to setup each feature, and then will need to wait several days for responses (depending on how much traffic you have).

New to Hotjar? You will of course first need to create a Hotjar account if you haven’t already done so. They offer a free basic plan, so I suggest you try that first. Then you need to add the tracking code which is very simple – they have install guides for each website platform too.

Signup to Hotjar for free and start using this guide on your website
Ready to get started improving your website? Get your free Hotjar basic plan now

This setup and collecting research part is vital, and there are many things to ensure you do, particularly for the poll and survey features. Don’t rush into using Hotjar out of excitement or you won’t spend enough time setting it up to maximize your website insights.

1: Turn on heatmaps for your key website pages.

The first thing you need to setup are heatmaps. These help you understand exactly what your visitors are clicking on your website. And it’s often different than what you might expect!

It’s really easy to turn on heatmaps, but don’t just turn them on for your homepage and a few other pages, you need to determine your most important pages to turn them on for. This should be your key pages and ones relating to your website goals, like your product or service pages, and your checkout or signup flow. You should also create them for your top entry pages, as these get seen very often and visitors will often judge your whole website based on them.

hotjar heatmpap setup

You will need at least 500 views per heatmap that you create so you get a representative sample to review and gain insights from – the more views the better.

2: Turn on the visitor recordings feature.

Next you need to turn on the visitor recording feature. This lets you start gaining excellent insights by watching your visitors website journey and most common issues that you will need to fix and improve.

To get these recordings started, click ‘Record visitors’ on the recordings section of the tool and it will begin to record your visitors on your whole website – there is no need to pick specific pages. There are a few extra options, but I suggest you leave the default options on, and you can limit the recordings to specific pages if you have a pro level account.

hotjar record visitors setup

Ideally you need at least 50 recordings to review and gain insights from, and at least 20 that involve multiple page flows to get a good understanding of your visitors common whole journey.

I asked a Hotjar expert for some of his words advice on recordings, Joris Byron:

Joris Bryon, CRO Expert at Yorro.co
“My #1 tip for Hotjar: Don’t use visitor recordings unless you know what you’re looking for. If you don’t know what you’re looking for you’ll be watching hours of videos and you won’t get any wiser. For example: in GA you see a huge dropoff on the form in your checkout. Start recording the visits to that page and see what people are doing on that specific page. Only record the sessions with visits to that page. That way you won’t ‘waste’ visitor recordings on sessions that are at that point irrelevant for your analysis. By focusing your visitor recordings on the sessions that matter, you’ll save a lot of time and you’ll learn a lot more than just randomly recording and watching sessions.”

3: Create a feedback poll for each of your key pages.

This poll feature is one of the best ways to gain feedback, but if you don’t ask a good enough question or don’t choose the right page to ask it on, you won’t get very good insights. The key is to ask relevant questions for each of your key pages that provide you actionable insights – not just yes/no or generic questions. For example, if you have a prices or plans page, ask a question for gaining feedback about your pricing, like whether pricing seems reasonable or plan differences are easy to understand.

You will get better insights running polls on pages relating to your website goals, and work very well on features pages, product pages, sales pages, pricing pages and signup pages. Homepages don’t work as well, as visitors often don’t know enough about what you offer to give feedback at that point in their journey.

When you create these polls, the most important options are choosing the page to target, the type of poll (multiple choice or long text answers work well), giving visitors the choice to get a response, choosing 20 seconds for the trigger behavior for the poll (sooner and you risk annoying visitors) and most importantly, choosing a question to ask. You can actually ask more than 1 question and use logic to show a related question next that relates to their answer  – this helps you get more detailed feedback.

Hotjar poll setup

Here are some great poll questions for gaining better insights on your key pages:

– Is there anything stopping you from purchasing today?

– Which elements look most and least appealing?

– Is there anything you don’t understand?

– What do you think of the pricing of our service/product?

– Would a free trial or guarantee compel them to try it?

– What else could be added to make our service more appealing?

You should aim to collect at least 50 responses for each page poll that you are running. Any less and you may not get a representative sample to gain insights from.

4: Create a survey for in-depth general website feedback

This survey feature is excellent for gaining more indepth general visitor insights about your website, and complements feedback gathered by poll insights. So go ahead and setup a survey of less than 10 questions (any more and you will get lower completion rates). While setting it up, use the option to popup the survey on your website, but choose the trigger option to wait at least 60 seconds after visitors arrive or after a few page views, or you risk annoying them.

Hotjar survey setup

To get more responses I also suggest you offer an incentive for visitors to complete your surveys (like a discount or free months access to what you are offering).

The key is don’t just ask questions about your product/service and visitor demographics, the survey questions should be more focused on the actual website experience. Here are some good questions to use to gain excellent insights for improving your website:

– What was the main reason you came to this website today?

– Did you find what you are looking for? If not, why not?

– What features of our website and offering did you find most appealing?

– What do you feel could be improved on our website?

– Have you visited other similar websites? Did you prefer anything on them?

– What do you think of the shipping and delivery options?

– What are the biggest factors that influence your decision to purchase?

How easy was it to use our website? Did you find anything difficult?

You will need at least 50 responses to analyze in phase 2. This should be quite achievable depending on your traffic levels. To gain more responses I suggest you create an additional survey customized just for your existing customers and send that out via email.

5: Setup a funnel analysis for your checkout or signup page

Next turn on the funnels feature for your most important flow of pages like your checkout or signup set of pages. Setting up this funnel helps you discover at which pages that visitors most often drop out from – indicating issues and potential for improvement. E.g you may find that your billing page has a very high drop off rate.

Setting up this funnel is easy and works much like creating a goal in Google Analytics. Just click ‘new funnel’ and enter names for each step and the corresponding page URL structure. You should set this up for your main conversion funnel like a checkout or signup flow, but also for most common visitor funnels that go back earlier in the visitor journey, for example from the homepage to the features page, to the sign-up page.

hotjar funnel setup

Ideally you need in the very least 100 funnel visitor sessions to start gaining insights from.

6: Setup form analysis for your important forms or single page checkout

This last step is optional depending on whether you have long forms on your website – for example a sign-up form or a single page checkout. This form analytics feature of Hotjar lets you discover which fields on your forms that visitors abandon the most, and is something you can’t actually do with Google Analytics. For example, you may find out that people are confused about one of the questions you are asking in the signup form, or don’t like giving the answer to one of your personal information questions.

This is also easy to setup. For every form you want to track, just click ‘new form’ and then enter the page URL that contains the form you want to analyze. Then you confirm which fields in the form that you want to track. You will need at least 100 form views to start getting reliable insights.

hotjar form setup

Note: I haven’t mentioned turning on the last feature of the tool, user feedback recruitment, as you actually need other tools like UserFeel.com to be able to setup, gather, and analyze the actual user feedback. This part of the tool just helps you find people to recruit.

Part two: Look for insights from Hotjar findings

Time required for this part: This is the most important part, and you ideally need to spend at least 4 hours reviewing the results from each part of the tool you setup.

In this essential part you gather insights and website improvement ideas from each area of Hotjar that you just setup. Gathering these insights is the important conversion research part of CRO, and doing this leads to better understanding of your visitors and their needs, and therefore better website improvement ideas.

If you don’t spend adequate time reviewing findings and creating insights then you won’t get very good website improvement ideas. Here are the main insights to look for when analyzing your findings:

1: Review the heatmaps for key pages. First you need to gain good insights from the heatmaps which will help you create ideas to improve your website.  Here are some key things to consider when reviewing heatmaps for each of your key pages:

  • Are visitors clicking or looking at parts of your page that you would expect?
  • Are any elements being ignored that are important to your goals and need promoting better?
  • What links in the navigation are clicked most or least? This gives you a great idea of visitor intent and for optimizing menu contents.
  • Is anything being clicked on more than your main CTA buttons? This may indicate confusion or non engaging CTA wording.
  • Are visitors not scrolling far down your pages and often not seeing key content?

The goal is to create at least 10 heatmap insights you can use to improve your website sales or leads.

hotjar heatmap

2: Review the visitor session recordings. Next you need to start watching recordings of your visitors on your website. But to get the most insights from them you have to know what to look for – and not just watch them all as this can be very time consuming. Here are some best practices to help you:

  • Review recordings from your most important pages first – your homepage, your product or service pages, and your signup/checkout flow. You can setup filters to only see these.
  • Watch at least 10 videos for each key page to get a feel for how users interact with each of them.
  • Look for which parts of the pages visitors seem to get stuck on or don’t seem to notice.
  • Look how often visitors click the back button or go the previous page, as this can indicate confusion.
  • Look for any small errors or usability issues that you may not have noticed before.
  • Review recordings on mobile devices too – these are really important for gaining insights into your mobile visitors and their challenges.
  • When reviewing each video, use the tag feature for recordings using words that help you summarize what happens (checkout issue, confused, purchaser etc).
  • If you have a pro account, use the notes feature to comment on specific points of the session replay. This makes it much easier to keep track of insights

Using these tips be sure to create at least 10 insights as you review your visitor session recordings.

hotjar visitor recording

3: Review your poll visitor responses. After you have got enough responses to each of your polls you need to start looking for insights from the feedback you have received. Here are the most important things to do to maximize your insights:

  • See which type of feedback response is most common if you are using multiple choice answers. The results graph lets you quickly see the most common responses.
  • For open response questions, use the ‘word cloud’ results option look for common words so you can see patterns for what visitors are giving feedback most often about.
  • If you haven’t got much feedback that is useful, consider changing your question to be more specific or change the topic slightly.
  • Based on the feedback you have received, consider creating follow up polls to dig a little deeper into most common responses.

The goal is to create at least 10 website improvement insights based on feedback from your visitor polls.

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4: Review your visitor survey responses. Next you need to analyze the feedback you get from the surveys you created. To help you create better website improvement insights, here are some of the key things to consider when reviewing your responses:

  • Discover the most common answers for each of your questions and look for most common patterns.
  • Understand which parts of your website they think need improving the most.
  • Understand visitor’s purchase motivations – do you give them enough information to purchase?
  • Discover visitor’s major issues using your website, and what they had most trouble finding or doing.
  • Learn which competitors they like using, and reasons why. What is lacking on your website in comparison to them?

Create at least 10 insights from the survey feedback that will help you improve your website.

5: Review your funnel report. After you have enough visitors to your funnel you need to look for insights into how these key pages are performing. Here are some key things to look for to improve your insights:

  • Check which page of the funnel has the highest drop off percentage – come up with insights why this might be.
  • Any page with over 50% drop off rate is high and you should create insights for improving these pages.
  • Look at the visitor recordings and heatmaps for each of the pages with highest drop off to help you come up with insights for improving these pages.
  • Setup a poll for any of the pages that have high drop pages (if you haven’t already done so previously).
  • Look for the total conversion rate at the top of each funnel report. If this is for your checkout or signup flow of pages, anything lower than 30% conversion rate is below average and means you have big room for improvement (this is because the average shopping cart abandonment rate is 68%).

The goal is to create at least 10 insights from the funnel report to help you improve your website.

hotjar funnel report

6: Review your forms reports. If you setup a form to analyze you should next analyze the results from this and create insights to improve your forms. these are some of the most important things to look for while reviewing the report:

  • Check which form field has the highest drop off percentage, and think of reasons causing this.
  • Are any of your form fields confusing that might be leading to higher drop off rates?
  • Do you really need to ask for personal information in your fields? This lowers completion rates.
  • Do you need to make all of your form fields mandatory? Can you make some non-mandatory?
  • Watch recordings of visitors completing your forms to see if you can get additional insights.
  • How good are your error validation messages? This is important to improve to reduce form exits.

From the form report try to come up with as many insights as possible to improve your key forms.

hotjar form report

Note: In addition to these Hotjar tool insights, it’s also essential to look at your Google Analytics reports to find additional insights like the bounce rate and conversion rate for your key pages. You should also run usability tests with your target audience using a tool like UserFeel.com to gain additional feedback and gain insights from that.

Part three: Create and launch high-impact improvement ideas

Time required for this part: You should spend at least 3 hours creating ideas based on insights, ideally brainstorming with other team members.

This is where things get exciting and you start to launch website improvements based on the insights you have gathered using Hotjar. But to ensure greatest chances of increasing your website sales or leads, you need to know how to best turn the insights into ideas, and know what to launch first for biggest impact.

1: Turn your insights into improvement ideas.

Now that you have created some excellent insights from your findings in part two, next you need to turn these into ideas for website improvement and A/B test ideas (if you have enough traffic). To help you prioritize, here are the key things you need to list for each idea:

  • A short descriptive name for your improvement idea.
  • A hypothesis for each idea (the reason why you think it will have a good impact).
  • The insights used to create each idea (for example insights from Hotjar or web analytics).
  • Estimate the likely impact the idea would have on increasing conversions and sales (ranked 1 to 10, with 10 being highest potential).
  • List how much traffic each page gets relating to each idea – the more the better (ranked 1 to 10, with 10 being highest traffic).
  • Estimate how easy the idea would be to launch in terms of design and development (rank 1 to 10, with 10 being easiest).

Here is a sample of the tool I use to list and prioritize website improvement ideas, which you can download for free in my toolbox:

2: Prioritize the improvement ideas based on highest impact.

Rather than guess at what improvement or test idea to launch first on your website (which can lead to varying success), with the information you listed for each idea you can now prioritize and determine the ones that will maximize your chances of increasing your website sales or leads.

To do this prioritization, on your ideas sheet simply sort the likely impact column to show highest rated ones first. Then look for the ideas towards the top that have the highest ease of launch rating – these are going to give you the quickest and biggest impact on improving your website. These easier to change high impact ideas are known as low hanging fruit, and typically will involve changing simple things on key pages like headlines and call-to-action buttons.

3: Start launching highest potential ideas first, and progress through the list.

Once you have determined the improvement ideas that will likely have biggest impact and easiest to implement, start launching the ideas one at time. You will often need to get your website designer and developer to help create the visuals and code. Don’t forget to get help from the marketing team to help you writing better headlines, wording and call-to-actions too.

For each improvement you launch, monitor the impact on your key metrics in your Google Analytics reports, both for the page you are trying to improve (lower exit rate and higher conversion rate) and for your website as a whole (increased website conversion rate and improved shopping cart/signup abandonment rates).

Ideally you should A/B test a few variations for each improvement idea as this helps you experiment and find the best performing variation for your ideas. For low traffic pages this A/B testing may not be possible though – this guide will help you if you low traffic.

After you have launched about 5 improvements to your website, you should start to see some great impact on increased conversion rates, sales or leads. Don’t stop there though, keep working through the list until you have launched all of the ideas you created.

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Wrapping up

Using Hotjar and this guide should really help improve your website sales or leads, and ideally you should repeat this improvement process at least one a year on your website, and definitely when you have just changed major elements on your website.

Now over to you – have you started using Hotjar yet? What is your favorite tool to gain insights?

The Universal Analytics Command Queue

For those of you who remember Google Analytics classic, the next four characters I write after this sentence should ring with nostalgia:

_gaq

_gaq is the name of the global variable that Google Analytics would install when it was executed on a page. The _gaq variable was defined (initially) as an Array. The default snippet had it right at the top:

<script type="text/javascript">
  var _gaq = _gaq || [];
  _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-XXXXX-X']);
  _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);

  (function() {
      var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
      ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
      var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
  })();
</script>

The _gaq array was a command queue for things we wanted Google Analytics to do. The default snippet passed it some stuff right away – specifically, it passed in the instructions to create a tracker and fire a pageview. This pattern was really cool – it allowed for commands to be registered in-line while the browser was busy fetching Google Analytics and was the backbone of GA’s transition to asynchronous loading. No messy callbacks, no need to check if _gaq was defined; once Google Analytics loaded, each command would be executed in the order it appeared in the queue.

Another part of what made this exciting was that non-GA functions could also use the queue, and Google Analytics would call them for us. This allowed for clever folks to push in commands to run before Google Analytics did its tracker creation; for example, if I wanted to fire a callback function when Google Analytics loaded, I could do this:

var _gaq = window._gaq = window._gaq || [];

_gaq.push(function() {
  notifyGALoaded();
});

The first thing GA would do after it finished loading and bootstrapping itself would be to call my function, which would call notifyGALoaded, in turn. I could be comfortable adding this code anywhere, because GA would inherit any existing _gaq values non-destructively. This meant the .push() method always would work.

Then Universal Analytics came along and ruined everything – the new syntax didn’t use the familiar .push() syntax, and instead opted for commands to be pushed in as arguments to the function ga.

Getting Back Our Queue with the Alternative Syntax

Deep in the bowels of the Universal Analytics documentation, there’s an article that describes an alternative syntax for loading Google Analytics. We can use the first part of this snippet to get back our command queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

This snippet instantiates our ga global and configures the internal command queue for us. Now we can go right back to adding commands into our queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Do some stuff
});

Just like with our old _gaq Array, we needn’t be concerned about detechting when Google Analytics loads or accidentially overwriting the existing global.

So…?

You might be thinking “So, what? When would I need that anyways?”. Imagine you’re providing code to a 3rd party, and they want to dictate whether Google Analytics loads or not. You know Google Analytics may load, but you don’t want to force it to load if it doesn’t, and you don’t want to poll every n milliseconds to see if it has loaded. Now you can just instantiate the queue, push in your commands, and carry on worry-free.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;
ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXX-YY', ...)
// etc

You also may want to have code execute only after Google Analytics has loaded. Using this syntax, you can instantiate ga, push in your command, and be guaranteed that it will execute only after Google Analytics has loaded.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Some code I'd like to fire
});

This simple interface provides a really simple way to queue up commands before and after the Google Analytics library loads. How will you use it? Drop me a line or on Twitter.

For those of you who remember Google Analytics classic, the next four characters I write after this sentence should ring with nostalgia:

_gaq

_gaq is the name of the global variable that Google Analytics would install when it was executed on a page. The _gaq variable was defined (initially) as an Array. The default snippet had it right at the top:

<script type="text/javascript">
  var _gaq = _gaq || [];
  _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-XXXXX-X']);
  _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);

  (function() {
      var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
      ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
      var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
  })();
</script>

The _gaq array was a command queue for things we wanted Google Analytics to do. The default snippet passed it some stuff right away - specifically, it passed in the instructions to create a tracker and fire a pageview. This pattern was really cool - it allowed for commands to be registered in-line while the browser was busy fetching Google Analytics and was the backbone of GA's transition to asynchronous loading. No messy callbacks, no need to check if _gaq was defined; once Google Analytics loaded, each command would be executed in the order it appeared in the queue.

Another part of what made this exciting was that non-GA functions could also use the queue, and Google Analytics would call them for us. This allowed for clever folks to push in commands to run before Google Analytics did its tracker creation; for example, if I wanted to fire a callback function when Google Analytics loaded, I could do this:

var _gaq = window._gaq = window._gaq || [];

_gaq.push(function() {
  notifyGALoaded();
});

The first thing GA would do after it finished loading and bootstrapping itself would be to call my function, which would call notifyGALoaded, in turn. I could be comfortable adding this code anywhere, because GA would inherit any existing _gaq values non-destructively. This meant the .push() method always would work.

Then Universal Analytics came along and ruined everything - the new syntax didn't use the familiar .push() syntax, and instead opted for commands to be pushed in as arguments to the function ga.

Getting Back Our Queue with the Alternative Syntax

Deep in the bowels of the Universal Analytics documentation, there's an article that describes an alternative syntax for loading Google Analytics. We can use the first part of this snippet to get back our command queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

This snippet instantiates our ga global and configures the internal command queue for us. Now we can go right back to adding commands into our queue:

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Do some stuff
});

Just like with our old _gaq Array, we needn't be concerned about detechting when Google Analytics loads or accidentially overwriting the existing global.

So...?

You might be thinking "So, what? When would I need that anyways?". Imagine you're providing code to a 3rd party, and they want to dictate whether Google Analytics loads or not. You know Google Analytics may load, but you don't want to force it to load if it doesn't, and you don't want to poll every n milliseconds to see if it has loaded. Now you can just instantiate the queue, push in your commands, and carry on worry-free.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;
ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXX-YY', ...)
// etc

You also may want to have code execute only after Google Analytics has loaded. Using this syntax, you can instantiate ga, push in your command, and be guaranteed that it will execute only after Google Analytics has loaded.

window.ga=window.ga||function(){(ga.q=ga.q||[]).push(arguments)};ga.l=+new Date;

ga(function() {
  // Some code I'd like to fire
});

This simple interface provides a really simple way to queue up commands before and after the Google Analytics library loads. How will you use it? Drop me a line or on Twitter.